COVID-19 UPDATES: Find news and resources for audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and the public. 
Latest Updates | Telepractice Resources | Email Us 

Central Auditory Processing Disorder

Roles and Responsibilities of Audiologists

Audiologists play a central role in the screening, assessment, diagnosis, and management of persons with CAPD as part of an interdisciplinary team. Professional roles and activities in audiology include clinical/educational services (diagnosis, assessment, planning, and management); prevention and advocacy; and education, administration, and research. See ASHA's Scope of Practice in Audiology (ASHA, 2018) and ASHA's Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Audiology (ASHA, 2006).

Appropriate roles for audiologists involved in the assessment, diagnosis, and management of CAPD include the following:

  • Remaining informed of research in the area of CAPD as related to the audiologist's contribution to patient management
  • Educating other professionals about the needs of individuals with CAPD and the role of audiologists in CAPD management
  • Participating in interdisciplinary team consultation (see ASHA's resource on Interprofessional Education/Interprofessional Practice [IPE/IPP]) for the assessment and management of CAPD
  • Conducting comprehensive audiologic evaluations
  • Obtaining a CAPD-specific case history
  • Selecting an appropriate and individualized CAPD test battery
  • Administering CAPD-specific assessments and interpreting the results
  • Diagnosing CAPD
  • Communicating results and recommendations to the patient/family and other appropriate parties
  • Developing and implementing culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment and intervention plans as part of an interdisciplinary team
  • Proceeding with assessment and fitting for hearing assistive technology systems (HATS), as appropriate
  • Providing education and counsel to the patient and family
  • Referring the patient to other professionals, as needed, to facilitate access to comprehensive services (e.g., speech-language pathology, psychology, neuro-otology, and neuropsychology)

As indicated in the Code of Ethics (ASHA, 2016a), audiologists who work in this capacity should be specifically educated and appropriately trained to do so.

Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play a role in the screening, assessment, and management of persons with CAPD as part of an interdisciplinary team. Professional roles and activities in speech-language pathology include clinical/educational services, prevention and advocacy, education, administration, and research. See ASHA's Scope of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology (ASHA, 2016b) and ASHA's Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Speech-Language Pathology (ASHA, 2004).

Appropriate roles and responsibilities for SLPs involved in the assessment and management of CAPD and language processing disorders include the following:

  • Remaining informed of research in the area of CAPD as related to the SLP's contribution to patient management
  • Educating other professionals about the needs of individuals with CAPD and the role of SLPs in CAPD management
  • Participating in interdisciplinary team consultation (see ASHA's resource on Interprofessional Education/Interprofessional Practice [IPE/IPP]) for the assessment and management of CAPD
  • Collecting information about skills related to auditory processing (e.g., auditory working memory, auditory comprehension) using a variety of screening and assessment instruments
  • Conducting comprehensive cognitive-communication and speech and language assessments.
  • Obtaining a CAPD-specific case history
  • Identifying the cognitive-communicative and/or speech and language factors that may be associated with CAPD
  • Providing a clinical description of the patient's speech perception
  • Helping to identify or differentiate disorders in phonology or language processing that may be comorbid to CAPD
  • Helping to determine the precise nature of the diagnosed disorder(s) and the functional implications associated with the disorder(s)
  • Communicating results and recommendations to the patient/family and other appropriate parties
  • Developing and implementing culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment and intervention plans as part of an interdisciplinary team
  • Providing education and counsel to the patient and family
  • Referring the patient to other professionals, as needed, to facilitate access to comprehensive services (e.g., audiology, psychology, and neuropsychology)

As indicated in the Code of Ethics (ASHA, 2016a), SLPs who work in this capacity should be specifically educated and appropriately trained to do so.

Content Disclaimer: The Practice Portal, ASHA policy documents, and guidelines contain information for use in all settings; however, members must consider all applicable local, state and federal requirements when applying the information in their specific work setting.