Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Adamson, L., Romski, M., Deffebach, K., & Sevcik, R. (1992). Symbol vocabulary and the focus of conversations: Augmenting language development for youth with mental retardation. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 35, 1333–1343.

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Angelo, D. H., Jones, S. D., & Kokoska, S. M. (1995). Family perspective on augmentative and alternative communication: Families of young children. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 11, 193–201.

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Autism Spectrum Australia (Aspect) (2013, March). Evaluation of the Language Acquisition Through Motor Planning (LAMP) Program with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Aspect Research Insights, 6, 1–4. Retrieved from https://www.liberator.co.uk/media/wysiwyg/Documents/Autism_Spectrum_LAMP_Research_Report.pdf

Bailey, R. L., Parette, H. P., Jr., Stoner, J. B., Angell, M. E., & Carroll, K. (2006). Family members' perceptions of augmentative and alternative communication device use. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 37, 50–60.

Barker, R. M., Saunders, K. J., & Brady, N. C. (2012). Reading instruction for children who use AAC: Considerations in the pursuit of generalizable results. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 28, 160–170.

Beukelman, D., McGinnis, J., & Morrow, D. (1991). Vocabulary selection in augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 7, 171–185.

Beukelman, D. R., & Mirenda, P. (2013) Augmentative and alternative communication: Supporting children and adults with complex communication needs. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Binger, C., & Light, J. (2006). Demographics of preschoolers who require AAC. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 37, 200–208.

Binger, C., & Light, J. (2007). The effect of aided AAC modeling on the expression of multi-symbol messages by preschoolers who use AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 23, 30–43.

Blockberger, S., & Johnston, J. (2003). Grammatical morphology acquisition by children with complex communication needs. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 19, 207–221.

Blockberger, S., & Sutton, A. (2003). Towards linguistic competence: The language experiences and knowledge of children with extremely limited speech. In J. Light, D. Beukelman, & J. Reichle (Eds.), Communication competence for individuals who use AAC (pp. 63–106). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Boenisch, J., & Soto, G. (2015). The oral core vocabulary of typically developing English speaking school-aged children: Implications for AAC practice. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 31, 77–84.

Brady, N. C. (2000). Improved comprehension of object names following voice output communication aid use: Two case studies. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 16, 197–204.

Brady, N., Bruce, S., Goldman, A., Erickson, K., Mineo, B., Ogletree, B., . . . Wilkinson, K. (2016). Communication services and supports for individuals with severe disabilities: Guidance for assessment and intervention. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 121, 121-138.

Calculator, S. N. (2009). Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and inclusive education for students with the most severe disabilities. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 13, 93–113.

Carr, E., & Durand, M. (1985). Reducing behavior problems through functional communication training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 111–126.

Costello, J. M. (2011, 2016). Message banking, voice banking and legacy messages [Message banking examples from people with ALS]. Boston, MA: Boston Children's Hospital. Retrieved from http://www.childrenshospital.org/~/media/centers-and-services/programs/a_e/augmentative-communication-program/messagebankdefinitionsandvocab201613.ashx?la=en

Dark, L., & Balandin, S. (2007). Prediction and selection of vocabulary for two leisure activities. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 23, 288–299.

Denton, D. D. (1976). The philosophy of total communication. Carlisle, United Kingdom: The British Deaf Association.

Drager, K. D. R., Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2010). Effects of AAC interventions on communication and language for young children with complex communication needs. Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Approach, 3, 303–310.

Drager, K. D. R., Light, J., Speltz, J., Fallon, K., & Jeffries, L. (2003). The performance of typically developing 2½-year-olds on dynamic display AAC technologies with different system layouts and language organizations. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 46, 298–312.

Drager, K. D. R., Postal, V. J., Carroulus, L., Castellano, M., Gagliano, C., & Glynn, J. (2006). The effect of aided language modeling on symbol comprehension and production in 2 preschoolers with autism. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 15, 112–125.

Dukhovny, E., & Kelly, E. B. (2015). Practical resources for provision of services to culturally and linguistically diverse users of AAC. Perspectives on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity, 22, 25–39.

Enderby, P., Judge, S., Creer, S., & John, A. (2013, April). Beyond the anecdote: Examining the need for, and provision of, AAC in the United Kingdom [Research Report, Communication Matters]. Retrieved from http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/76406/1/2013_AAC_Evidence_Base_Beyond_the_Anecdote.pdf

Erickson, K. A., Koppenhaver, D. A., & Cunningham, J. W. (2006). Balanced reading intervention and assessment in augmentative communication. In R. J. McCauley, M. E. Fey, & R. Gillam (Eds.), Treatment of language disorders in children (pp. 309–346). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Flippin, M., Reska, S., & Watson, L. R. (2010). Effectiveness of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) on communication and speech for children with autism spectrum disorders: A meta-analysis. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 19, 178–195.

Fuller, D., & Lloyd, L. (1991). Toward a common usage of iconicity terminology. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 7, 215–220.

Ganz, J. B. (2014). Aided augmentative communication for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. New York, NY: Springer.

Glennen, S. L. (1997). Augmentative and alterative communication systems. In S. L. Glennen & D. C. DeCoste (Eds.), Handbook of augmentative and alternative communication (pp. 59–96). San Diego, CA: Singular.

Golinker, L. (2015, July). Funding for SGDs in 2015: Updates and implications for the AAC community. Presentation at United States Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Bath, United Kingdom. Retrieved from https://www.isaac-online.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015-04-08-Final-USSAAC-2015-SGD-Funding-Update-and-Implications.pdf

Goossens', C. (1989). Aided communication intervention before assessment: A case study of a child with cerebral palsy. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 5, 14–26.

Goossens', C., Crain, S. S., & Elder, P. (1992). Engineering the preschool environment for interactive symbolic communication 18 months to 5 years developmentally. Birmingham, AL: Southeast Augmentative Communication Publications.

Harris, L., Doyle, E. S., & Haaf, R. (1996). Language treatment approach for users of AAC: Experimental single-subject investigation. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 12, 230–243.

Harris, M., & Reichle, J. (2004). The impact of aided language stimulation on symbol comprehension and production in children with moderate cognitive disabilities. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 13, 155–167.

Harris, O. (2015). A cultural basis to develop strong advocates for client and family involvement in the speech-generated device evaluation and funding process. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 24, 142–146.

Hart, J. E., & Whalon, K. J. (2008). Promote academic engagement and communication of students with autism spectrum disorder in inclusive settings. Intervention in School and Clinic, 44, 116–120.

Hetzroni, O. E. (2004). AAC and literacy. Disability and Rehabilitation, 26, 1305–1312.

Hill, K., & Corsi, V. (2012). Role of speech-language pathologists in assistive technology assessments. In S. Federici & M. J. Scherer (Eds.), Assistive technology assessment handbook (pp. 301–327). Boca Raton. FL: CRC Press.

Hodgdon, L. Q. (1995). Solving social-behavioral problems through the use of visually supported communication. In K. A. Quill (Ed.), Teaching children with autism: Strategies to enhance communication and socialization (pp. 265–286). New York, NY: Delmar.

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Johnson, J. M., Inglebret, E., Jones, C., & Ray, J. (2006). Perspectives of speech-language pathologists regarding success versus abandonment of AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 22, 85–99.

Johnston, S. S., Reichle, J., Feeley, K. M., & Jones, E. A. (2012). AAC strategies for individuals with moderate to severe disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Kaiser, A. P., Yoder, P. J., & Keetz, A. (1992). Evaluating milieu teaching. In S. F. Warren & J. Reichle (Eds.), Causes and effects in communication and language intervention (pp. 9–47). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Kangas, K., & Lloyd, L. (1988). Early cognitive skills as prerequisites to augmentative and alternative communication use: What are we waiting for? Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 4, 211–221.

Kasari, C., Kaiser, A., Goods, K., Nietfeld, J., Mathy, P., Landa, R., . . . Almirall, D. (2014). Communication interventions for minimally verbal children with autism: A sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53, 635–646.

Kenney, M. K., & Kogan, M. D. (2011). Special needs children with speech and hearing difficulties: Prevalence and unmet needs. Academic Pediatrics, 11, 152–160.

Kent-Walsh, J., & Binger, C. (2009). Addressing the communication demands of the classroom for beginning communicators and early language users. In G. Soto & C. Zangari (Eds.), Practically speaking: Language, literacy and academic development for students with AAC needs (pp. 143–172). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Light, J. C., Beukelman, D. R., & Reichle, J. (2003). Communicative competence for individuals who use AAC: From research to effective practice. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Light, J. C., Collier, B., & Parnes, P. (1985). Communicative interaction between young nonspeaking physically disabled children and their primary caregivers. Part I: Discourse patterns. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 1, 74–83.

Light, J. C., & McNaughton, D. (2012). The changing face of augmentative and alternative communication: Past, present, and future challenges. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 28, 197–204.

Light, J. C., &, McNaughton, D. (2014). Communicative competence for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: A new definition for a new era of communication? Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 30, 1–18.

Light, J. C., McNaughton, D., Krezman, C., Williams, M., Gulens, M., Galskoy, A., & Umpleby, M. (2007). The AAC Mentor Project: Web-based instruction in sociorelational skills and collaborative problem solving for adults who use augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 23, 56–75.

Light, J. C., Stoltz, B., & McNaughton, D. (1996). Community-based employment: Experiences of adults who use AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 12, 215–228.

Lüke, C. (2014). Impact of speech-generating devices on the language development of a child with childhood apraxia of speech: A case study. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 11, 80–88.

Lund, S. K., & Light, J. C. (2007). Long-term outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication: Part III-contributing factors. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 23, 323–335.

McGee, G. G., Morrier, M. J., & Daly, T. (1999). An incidental teaching approach to early intervention for toddlers with autism. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 24, 133–146.

Mechling, L. C. (2007). Assistive technology as a self-management tool for prompting students with intellectual disabilities to initiate and complete daily tasks: A literature review. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 42, 252–269.

Millar, D. C., Light, J. C., & McNaughton, D. B. (2004). The effect of direct instruction and writer's workshop on the early writing skills of children who use augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 20, 164–178.

Millar, D. C., Light, J. C., & Schlosser, R. W. (2006). The impact of augmentative and alternative communication intervention on the speech production of individuals with developmental disabilities: A research review. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49, 248–264.

Mirenda, P. (1997). Supporting individuals with challenging behavior through functional communication training and AAC: Research review. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 13, 207–225.

National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons With Severe Disabilities. (1992). Guidelines for meeting the communication needs of persons with severe disabilities [Guidelines]. Available from www.asha.org/policy or www.asha.org/njc

New York State Medicaid Speech Generating Device and Related Accessories Guidelines. (2012). Retrieved from https://www.emedny.org/providermanuals/DME/PDFS/SGD_Coverage_Guidelines_final.10-08-12.pdf

Nunes, D. R. (2008). AAC Interventions for autism: A research summary. International Journal of Special Education, 23, 17–26.

Pape, T. L. B., Kim, J., & Weiner, B. (2002). The shaping of individual meanings assigned to assistive technology: A review of personal factors. Disability and Rehabilitation, 24, 5–20.

Parette, H. P., Brotherson, M. J., & Huer, M. B. (2000). Giving families a voice in augmentative and alternative communication decision-making. Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Development Disabilities, 35, 177–190.

Parette, H. P., VanBiervliet, A., & Hourcade, J. J. (2000). Family-centered decision making in assistive technology. Journal of Special Education Technology, 15, 45–55.

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Ratcliff, A., Koul, R., & Lloyd, L. L. (2008). Preparation in augmentative and alternative communication: An update for speech-language pathology training. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 17, 48–59.

Reichle, J., York, J., & Sigafoos, J. (1991). Implementing augmentative and alternative communication: Strategies for learners with severe disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

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Romski, M., & Sevcik, R. A. (2005). Augmentative communication and early intervention: Myths and Realities. Infants and Young Children, 18, 174–185.

Romski, M., Sevcik, R. A., Adamson, L. B., Cheslock, M., Smith, A., Barker, M., & Bakeman, R. (2010). Randomized comparison of augmented and nonaugmented language interventions for toddlers with developmental delays and their parents. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 53, 350–364.

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