American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Position Statement

Use of Endoscopy by Speech-Language Pathologists: Position Statement

Working Group on Endoscopy


About this Document

This position statement is an official policy of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The ASHA Scope of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology (ASHA, 2007) states that the practice of speech-language pathology includes providing services for individuals with speech, voice, resonance, and swallowing disorders. The ASHA Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Speech-Language Pathology (ASHA, 2004b) are statements that define universally applicable characteristics of practice. It is required that individuals who practice independently in this area hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology and abide by the ASHA Code of Ethics (ASHA, 2003), including Principle of Ethics II, Rule B, which states that “individuals shall engage in only those aspects of the profession that are within the scope of their competence, considering their level of education, training, and experience.” This document was developed by the Working Group on Endoscopy. Members of the group were Susan Butler (chair), Robert Hillman, Bernice Klaben, Susan Langmore, Alison Scheer-Cohen, Thomas Watterson, and Janet Brown (ASHA liaison). Brian B. Shulman, vice president for professional practices in speech-language pathology (2006–2008), served as the monitoring officer. This document was approved by the Board of Directors on April 18, 2008.


Table of Contents


Position Statement

It is the official position of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) that endoscopy is an imaging procedure included within the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists and described in previously established ASHA documents (ASHA, 1998, 2004c, 2004d, 2004e, 2005a, 2005b, 2007). Speech-language pathologists with specialized training (ASHA, 2002, 2004a) in flexible/nasal endoscopy, rigid/oral endoscopy, and/or stroboscopy use these tools for the purpose of evaluating and treating disorders of speech, voice, resonance, and swallowing function.

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References

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (1998). The roles of otolaryngologists and speech-language pathologists in the performance and interpretation of strobovideolaryngoscopy [Relevant paper]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2002). Knowledge and skills for speech-language pathologists performing endoscopic assessment of swallowing functions [Knowledge and skills]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2003). Code of ethics. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2004a). Knowledge and skills for speech-language pathologists with respect to vocal tract visualization and imaging [Knowledge and skills]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2004b). Preferred practice patterns for the profession of speech-language pathology. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2004c). Role of the speech-language pathologist in the performance and interpretation of endoscopic evaluation of swallowing: Guidelines [Guidelines]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2004d). Vocal tract visualization and imaging: Position statement [Position statement]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2004e). Vocal tract visualization and imaging: Technical report [Technical report]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2005a). The role of the speech-language pathologist in the performance and interpretation of endoscopic evaluation of swallowing: Position statement [Position statement]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2005b). The role of the speech-language pathologist in the performance and interpretation of endoscopic evaluation of swallowing: Technical report [Technical report]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2007). Scope of practice in speech-language pathology. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

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Other Resources

Aviv, J. E., Kaplan, S. T., Thomson, J. E., Spitzer, J., Diamond, B., & Close, L. G. (2000). The safety of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing (FEESST): An analysis of 500 consecutive evaluations. Dysphagia, 15, 39–44.

Aviv, J. E., Murry, T., Zschommler, A., Cohen, M., & Gartner, C. (2005). Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing: Patient characteristics and analysis of safety in 1,340 consecutive examinations. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology, 114, 173–176.

Cohen, M. A., Setzen, M., Perlman, P. W., Ditkoff, M., Mattucci, K. F., & Guss, J. (2003). The safety of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing in an outpatient otolaryngology setting. Laryngoscope, 113, 21–24.

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Index terms: assessment, endoscopy, swallowing

Reference this material as: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2008). Use of endoscopy by speech-language pathologists: position statement [Position Statement]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

© Copyright 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association disclaims any liability to any party for the accuracy, completeness, or availability of these documents, or for any damages arising out of the use of the documents and any information they contain.

doi:10.1044/policy.PS2008-00297

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