American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Position Statement

Role of Audiologists in Vestibular and Balance Rehabilitation: Position Statement

ASHA Ad Hoc Committee on Vestibular Rehabilitation


About this Document

This position statement is an official policy of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). It was developed by the Ad Hoc Committee on Vestibular Rehabilitation and adopted by the ASHA Legislative Council (LC-A/HS 1-99) in January 1999. Members of the committee include Nancy P. Garrus; Eric B. Hecker; Kenneth G. Henry; Susan Herdman, PhD, PT, consultant; Neil T. Shepard, chair; Charles W. Stockwell; and Maureen E. Thompson, ex officio. Richard Nodar, vice president for professional practices in audiology, served as monitoring vice president.


Position Statement

It is the position of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) that the following two areas of practice are within the scope of practice of audiologists who possess the general and specific knowledge and skills for these specific areas outlined in the ASHA Guidelines on the Role of Audiologists in Vestibular and Balance Rehabilitation:

  1. Canalith repositioning procedures (CRP), which consist of various methods of specific movements of the head and body designed to reposition otoconia and/or other material from abnormal location in one of the semicircular canals back into the vestibule region.

  2. Consultation to and/or serving as a member of a multidisciplinary team managing patients with balance disorders and/or dizziness.

ASHA maintains that professionals must be specifically trained as outlined in the ASHA Guidelines on the Role of Audiologists in Vestibular and Balance Rehabilitation Programs.

Performance of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) by lesser-trained individuals could lead to suboptimal results, prolongation of therapy, and possible exacerbation of other concomitant medical conditions.

This position statement recognizes further that the area of VBRT is changing rapidly and there is no intention to preclude future VBRT techniques from being included in the scope of practice for audiology.

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Index terms: balance, rehabilitation

Reference this material as: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (1999). Role of audiologists in vestibular and balance rehabilitation: position statement [Position Statement]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

© Copyright 1999 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association disclaims any liability to any party for the accuracy, completeness, or availability of these documents, or for any damages arising out of the use of the documents and any information they contain.

doi:10.1044/policy.PS1999-00037

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