American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

International Research

What funding and resources are available for international research?

The NIH does provide grant money for international research projects, international research collaborations, and international research training via the John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in Health Sciences. The Fogarty Center has many international research and international training grants available. For example, the Fogarty International Research Collaboration Award, or FIRCA, provides money for funded primary investigators, those who already have an NIH grant, to collaborate with investigators located in developing countries. All topic areas supported by NIH are eligible for FIRCA grants. The Fogarty International Collaborative Trauma and Injury Research Training program, or TRAUMA grant, is a training grant that focuses on acute care, survival, rehabilitation, and long-term health consequences of trauma and injury. The TRAUMA grants are also supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and the Pan American Health Organization. The NIH/Fogarty Clinical Research Training Scholars Program provides NIH support for graduate students who are interested in international clinical research. Included in the participating institutes is the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. To learn about these and other international research and training opportunities provided by the Fogarty Center, visit the Fogarty Center website.

Additional Resources

ASHA's Grants and Funding webpages
You may be eligible for financial assistance, loans, scholarships, awards, or grants in the field of communication sciences and disorders. In order to assist members, ASHA provides information on available funding resources for students and researchers.

ASHA's Interdisciplinary Collaborations webpage
Developed through ASHA's Research and Scientific Affairs Committee, the Interdisciplinary Collaborations Web page is designed to introduce fundamental issues involved in establishing and maintaining research collaborations.


This article first appeared in the February 2008 issue of Access Academics and Research.

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