American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

EBP Compendium: Summary of Systematic Review

Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (Canada)
Community Reintegration Following Acquired Brain Injury

McCabe, P., Lippert, C., et al. (2007).
Brain Inj, 21(2), 231-257.

Indicators of Review Quality:

The review addresses a clearly focused question No
Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided Yes
Search strategy is described in sufficient detail for replication No
Included studies are assessed for study quality Yes
Quality assessments are reproducible Yes

Description: This is a review of published studies evaluating the effectiveness of any treatment or intervention for individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) with outcomes relating to satisfaction and community reintegration. The majority of participants included individuals with traumatic brain injury.

Question(s) Addressed:

Question not specifically stated.

Population: Adults with acquired brain injury

Intervention/Assessment: Varied

Number of Studies Included: 38

Years Included: Not stated

Findings:

Conclusions:

  • Treatment
    • Cognitive-Communication
      • General Findings - While the review was not specific to speech and language treatment, the authors found limited evidence that “interventions using cognitive strategies, have improved the percentage of ABI patients returning to full vocational activity” (p. 255) and that vocational rehabilitation is more effective when implemented earlier following the injury.
  • Service Delivery
    • Dosage
      • General Findings -  The authors reported that individuals receiving intensive cognitive rehabilitation made significantly more improvement in community integration than those receiving standard neurorehabilitation.
      • Patient Perspectives - "Limited evidence that more intensive and structured cognitive rehabilitation therapy provided in both groups and individual settings improves participants’ satisfaction with community integration and cognitive functioning outcomes compared with standard, less structured multidisciplinary rehabilitation" (p. 244).
    •  Setting
      • General Findings - While the review was not specific to speech and language treatment, the authors found “rehabilitation whether hospital-based or community-based, improves the level of independence for persons with a brain injury” (p. 255) and that “there is also evidence that demonstrated the positive effects of community-based rehabilitation programs using a supported relationship mode of intervention" (p. 255).
    • Format
      • Patient Perspectives - "Limited evidence that more intensive and structured cognitive rehabilitation therapy provided in both groups and individual settings improves participants’ satisfaction with community integration and cognitive functioning outcomes compared with standard, less structured multidisciplinary rehabilitation" (p. 244). 



Keywords: Brain Injury, Cognition, Service Delivery Models

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Added to Compendium: December 2011

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