American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

EBP Compendium: Summary of Systematic Review

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Alzheimer's and Non-Alzheimer's Dementia: A Critical Review of Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Strategies

Saddichha, S., & Pandey, V. (2008).
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias, 23(2), 150-161.

Indicators of Review Quality:

The review addresses a clearly focused question No
Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided No
Search strategy is described in sufficient detail for replication Yes
Included studies are assessed for study quality Yes
Quality assessments are reproducible Yes

Description: This is a review of the scientific literature pertaining to nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for dementia. A number of nonpharmacologic treatments were addressed, including the use of cognitive strategies, reality orientation and cognitive stimulation treatments .

Question(s) Addressed:

Question not specifically stated.

Population: Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's dementia

Intervention/Assessment: Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.

Number of Studies Included: Not stated

Years Included: 1980 - 2006

Findings:

Conclusions:

  • Treatment
    • Cognition
      • Compensatory Treatments
        • Cognitive strategies have been used successfully to reduce cognitive load on patients in the early stages of dementia.
        • While evidence is only suggestive, cognitive "therapies are useful adjuncts to pharmacotherapy" (p. 158).
      • Restorative Treatments
        • General Findings
          • Cognitive strategies have been used successfully to reduce cognitive load on patients in the early stages of dementia.
          • While evidence is only suggestive, cognitive "therapies are useful adjuncts to pharmacotherapy" (p. 158).
        • Reminiscence Therapy - Little evidence is available pertaining to reminiscence therapy, and the studies reviewed indicate inconclusive results.
        • Reality Orientation - Reality orientation is an effective intervention for improving orientation to the temporal and spatial environment; however, it has not been demonstrated to improve well-being, communication, functional performance, or memory recall. 
        • Validation Therapy - Limited evidence suggests that validation therapy may be beneficial for individuals with dementia.
        • Simulated Presence - Little conclusive evidence is available for life review therapies with some evidence suggestive for simulated presence therapy. 

Keywords: Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Cognition, Memory

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Added to Compendium: December 2011

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