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Conference Faculty Collaboration for Preschool Language and Literacy

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Language Literacy Online Conference - Dec 2015 - AErica Barnes, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Literacy Teaching and Learning at the University of Albany. Her research investigates teacher-child interactions in preschool classrooms that promote vocabulary growth, with an emphasis on the developmental trajectories of children with varying levels of language abilities from low-income homes. Her work focuses on developing supports for teachers and professionals working with children in preschool and early childhood classrooms, with an emphasis on teaching vocabulary through the content areas. She received her doctorate in Development, Learning, and Diversity from Vanderbilt University's Peabody College, and holds a master's degree in Literacy and Learning Disabilities from the University of Michigan. She received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Early Childhood SIG of the American Educational Research Association in 2015.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of University of Albany
  • Received grant funds from IES

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Donna Boudreau, PhD, is a speech-language pathologist in Fort Collins, Colorado. She currently serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Northern Colorado as well as the University of Colorado, Boulder. Boudreau also serves as the department lead SLP in the department of speech-language pathology in Poudre School District. Boudreau's clinical and research interests focus on areas of early literacy and narrative skills in children with language and learning disorders.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Sonia Cabell, PhD, is a research scientist at the Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning at the University of Virginia. She holds a doctorate in Reading Education from the University of Virginia and has worked as a second-grade teacher and a reading specialist in two states. Cabell's research projects investigate aspects of language and literacy among preschool children who are at risk for later reading difficulties. She has authored an early writing curriculum and numerous articles, with work appearing in scholarly journals such as Early Childhood Research Quarterly and Developmental Psychology. Cabell's recent articles in The Reading Teacher focus on the topic of early writing instruction in preschool.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of University of Virginia
  • Received grant funds from Office of Head Start

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Author of article in The Reading Teacher Journal on the topic
  • Author of a Perspectives article on the topic

Elsa Cárdenas-Hagan, EdD, CALT, CCC-SLP, is a bilingual speech-language pathologist and certified academic language therapist. She is the director of Valley Speech Language and Learning Center in Brownsville, Texas, and works with Texas Institute for Measurement Evaluation and Statistics for the University of Houston. Cárdenas-Hagan is the author of Esperanza (HOPE), a Spanish language program designed to assist students who struggle with learning to read. Her research interests include the development of early reading assessments for Spanish-speaking students and the development of reading interventions for bilingual students. She was the co-principal investigator of a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Institute for Education Science that examined the oracy and literacy development in English and Spanish of Spanish-speaking children. She serves as the vice president of the International Dyslexia Association and has authored curricular programs, book chapters, and journal articles related to oracy and literacy development for English language learners.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Jessica Gosnell Caron, PhD, CCC-SLP, recently completed her PhD, with a focus in augmentative and alternative communication at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include maximizing communication outcomes for individuals with complex communication needs through literacy and mainstream technologies (e.g., mobile technology with apps and social media). Prior to pursuing her PhD, she was a clinician at Boston Children's Hospital in the Augmentative Communication Program.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Kimberlee Crass, PhD, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, is a speech-language pathologist and certified auditory-verbal therapist. She is the clinical education director of the Auditory-Based Intervention Program in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Crass has dedicated her clinical career to working with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families. Her clinical and research interests include aural (re)habilitation, language and literacy, and listening and spoken language development.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Nathan Curtis, MA, CCC-SLP, is the coordinator of speech-language pathology clinical services at Waldo County General Hospital (WCGH). He has more than 37 years of experience working with preschool and school-age children using a family-systems approach. Curtis coordinates and provides speech telepractice services using a team approach. He has a strong interest in peer coaching, coaching in real time during teletherapy, and building partnerships with families and teachers. Curtis is a lead instructor and mentor in the ATA-accredited speech telepractice training program at WCGH and presents at national conferences on the topics of coaching teachers, engaging preschoolers regarded as high-risk in telepractice, and integrating speech therapy services into school curricula. He has also co-written articles in professional publications on the use of technology programs and apps. Curtis has provided telepractice curriculum training/consultation to university faculty at major universities and helped develop the curriculum for the first graduate telepractice training course in the country.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of WCGH, which is an Accredited Training Program by the American Telemedicine Association
  • Member of NCS Pearson, Inc. Clinical Assessment Speech and Language Team: Speech and Language Advisory Board

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of ASHA SIG 18

Amy Donaldson, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the department of speech and hearing sciences at Portland State University. Her research focuses broadly on social communication and perception of social competence in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Donaldson examines intervention efficacy, pre- and post-professional development, and the influence of context on performance. Her research includes both group and single-subject methodology and focuses on interdisciplinary practice. She has been a practicing clinician for more than 20 years. Prior to arriving at Portland State University in 2009, Donaldson was a research assistant professor at the University of Washington, where she also completed her doctorate.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Received grant funds from Autism Speaks

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Perry Flynn, MEd, CCC-SLP, is a consultant for the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in the Area of Speech Language Pathology and is an associate professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. He is an ASHA Advisory Council member. Flynn also serves as the director of the Equestrian Sport Development Team for Special Olympics, North Carolina, and is an Operation Smile volunteer.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Dominick Fortugno, PhD, grew up on Long Island, where he completed undergraduate majors in English and psychology at Stony Brook University. His first encounter with school psychology came while working as a teacher assistant for preschoolers with developmental disabilities in Middle Island. Fortugno obtained his PhD in school psychology at Fordham University, then worked for several years as a psychologist for the Cooke Center for Learning and Development in New York City. In 2007, he was recruited to join Touro College's graduate school psychology program, where he worked first as a faculty member and then as the program director. In 2013, he became chair/director of undergraduate studies for the School of Health Sciences in Bay Shore, where he oversees the school's bachelor's degree and certificate programs as well as admissions tracks toward professional studies. Fortugno teaches classes in statistics, psychometric theory, research methods, cognitive assessment, and psychoeducational report writing. He serves as preschool liaison for the New York Association of School Psychologists and recently co-authored a book chapter on technology-based cognitive behavioral therapy in school settings.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Ron Gillam, PhD, CCC-SLP, holds the Raymond and Eloise Lillywhite Endowed Chair in Speech-Language Pathology at Utah State University, where he serves as the director of the Language, Education and Auditory Processing Brain Imaging Lab in the Emma Eccles Jones Early Childhood Education and Research Center. His research, which has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Education (ED), primarily concerns information processing, language assessment, and language intervention with school-age children with specific language impairments. Gillam has published two books, three tests, and more than 100 articles and book chapters. He has received numerous teaching and research awards, including ASHA Fellow, the Haydn Williams Fellow at Curtin University in Western Australia, the Dads Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship at the University of Texas at Austin, the Editor's Award for the article of highest merit in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (twice), and the 2009 Robins Award for the outstanding researcher at Utah State University.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Receives royalties from Pro-Ed, Inc.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member and volunteer with ASHA

Sandra Laing Gillam, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor in the department of communicative disorders and deaf education at Utah State University and the vice president for speech-language pathology practice for ASHA. She teaches courses in phonological development and disorders, school-age language development and disorders, professional issues, and assessment and intervention for speech and language disorders across the life span. Her research interests include assessment and intervention of language and literacy impairments, multicultural populations, and processes involved in text comprehension. Gillam was the principal investigator on an Institute of Education Sciences grant to develop narrative intervention procedures.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Creator of narrative program discussed in this presentation, and receives royalties for the narrative program

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Carol Scheffner Hammer, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor of communication sciences and disorders at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she teaches courses on language and literacy development/disorders and diverse populations. Prior to receiving her doctorate from The University of Iowa, she worked as a speech-language pathologist, specializing in services to children and families from diverse cultures. Hammer's research focuses on cultural and environmental influences on children's language and literacy development and the development and testing of home- and classroom-based school readiness interventions. Her research has been continually funded since 2000 by external funders, including the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Education Sciences, and Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation. Hammer is past editor of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and an ASHA Fellow.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Received funding from NIH, Administration for Children & Families (ACF), and U.S. Department of Education

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Mary Ellen Nevins, EdD, is an experienced educator of children who are deaf or hard of hearing and serves as the director of the certificate program in auditory-based intervention in the department of audiology and speech pathology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Prior to this appointment, Nevins was the director of Professional Preparation in Cochlear Implants (PPCI), a national continuing education project for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and educators. She has co-authored three texts: School Professionals Working with Children with Cochlear Implants (2006), The Parents Guide to Cochlear Implants (2002), and Children with Cochlear Implants in Educational Settings (1996). Nevins is recognized as a national expert on educational issues associated with deaf or hard of hearing children learning to listen and talk and the needs of the professionals with whom they work.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Receives author royalties from Plural Publishing, Inc.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of AG Bell Association for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Billy T. Ogletree, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor and head of the department of communication sciences and disorders at Western Carolina University. His professional interests include the communication abilities and needs of persons with severe disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder. Ogletree also has significant interests related to interprofessional education and interprofessional collaborative practice. He has enjoyed a 34-year career as a speech-language pathologist and has worked in a variety of settings, including public schools, residential facilities for persons with intellectual impairments, hospitals, and universities. Ogletree has published more than 70 products (articles, chapters, books, and manuals) and has made more than 100 professional presentations at state, regional, national, and international conferences. He chairs the National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons with Severe Disabilities and is an ASHA Fellow.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Douglas B. Petersen, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the division of communication disorders at the University of Wyoming. He is a certified speech-language pathologist with several years of clinical and research experience. His research is driven by a desire to greatly increase the prevalence of academic success for all children, including those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. Specifically, his research involves developing, validating, and testing methods of prevention, assessment, and intervention for decoding, spoken language, and written language. His work is centered around the principles of learning potential and modifiability, which has resulted in dynamic assessment measures, longer-term progress monitoring measures, and multi-tiered systems of learning support. His work focuses on turning the complex arena of language into explicit, efficient, and effective narrative-based assessment and intervention procedures.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Vice president of research for Language Dynamics Group (LDG)
  • Researcher and publisher of the CUBED assessment, Predictive Early Assessment of Reading and Language (PEARL), and Story Champs

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Brook Sawyer, PhD, is an assistant professor in the department of education and human services at Lehigh University. She holds a PhD in educational psychology from the University of Virginia. Her research is interdisciplinary and centers on promoting the development of young children, with a predominant focus on language and literacy development. Her research aims to support young children who have disabilities, are culturally and linguistically diverse, and/or live in poverty through better understanding of early childhood educators' and parents' current practices as well as developing interventions to enhance practices. She was formerly a public school teacher and guidance counselor.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Shelley Scarpino, PhD, is an assistant professor in the department of audiology and speech pathology at Bloomsburg University. Her research focuses on the development of speech, language, and early literacy skills in Spanish-English speaking children. She teaches courses related to normal language development, preschool and school-age language disorders, articulation and phonological disorders, and cultural and linguistic diversity.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

C. Melanie Schuele, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the department of hearing and speech sciences at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She was a school speech-language pathologist for several years. Her teaching and research interests focus on school-based issues. Schuele is project director for a U.S. Department of Education PhD leadership grant focused on language-literacy intervention research. She developed and directs Vanderbilt's School SLP Specialty Track in the master's degree program. Schuele conducts research in complex syntax and early literacy acquisition and teaches courses in child language impairment and speech sound disorders. She is a frequent provider of professional development for SLPs and other educators. Schuele co-authored The Intensive Phonological Awareness Program (2014), a small-group Tier 2 intervention that builds foundational phonological awareness skills in preparation for early decoding and spelling instruction. From 2000–2005, she collaborated with the West Virginia Department of Education to promote statewide curriculum changes that focused on classroom phonological awareness instruction and Intensive Phonological Awareness Program (IPAP) intervention with kindergarteners and first graders. Currently, Schuele collaborates with Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools in developing a speech-language-literacy intervention curriculum for preschoolers with primary speech and/or language impairment. She has provided extensive volunteer service to ASHA.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Receives author royalties from Brookes Publishing
  • Receives grant funds from Institute of Education Sciences (IES), ED, NIH, and Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB)
  • Employee of Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Andrew Shanock, PhD, is an associate professor of school psychology at the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York. Currently the president of the New York Association of School Psychologists (NYASP), Shanock is nationally certified and specializes in cognitive and academic assessment. He consults with school districts around the country to promote issues such as collaborative assessment, response to intervention, and instructional support team building. Shanock has had the privilege of presenting at several state speech-language pathology conferences.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Sean J. Sweeney, MS, MEd, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and technology consultant working in private practice at The Ely Center in Newton, Massachusetts. Sweeney spent more than a decade in the public school setting serving in the roles of speech-language pathology and instructional technology specialist. His blog, SpeechTechie, was inspired by the combination of those complementary vocations and a desire to empower those in his field to employ technology in their work. He currently consults to and presents for local and national organizations on technology integration in speech and language interventions. He is a frequent presenter at ASHA and has participated as a speaker at the regional Social Thinking Providers' Conferences. He is a regular columnist for The ASHA Leader.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Consultant, presenter, and blogger for Mindwing Concepts, Inc.
  • Consultant for Smarty Ears Apps

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Creator and blogger at SpeechTechie.com
  • ASHA member and regular ASHA Leader columnist

Anne van Kleeck, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor and Callier Research Scholar in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), where she teaches and conducts research at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders and is a faculty affiliate in the Center for Children and Families. Her research focuses on language and emerging literacy skills in preschoolers and kindergartners who are at risk academically due to general language impairments or more specific weaknesses with academic language only. In recent publications, she has proposed that a preschool academic talk (AT) register provides a critical foundation for later reading comprehension/academic achievement and hence is a pivotal readiness skill to address in our attempts to close academic achievement gaps. Her current work focuses on determining how educated parents socialize AT use in everyday routine event interactions, assessing children's skill with AT as distinct from everyday casual talk, and developing interventions with parents and preschool teachers as a means of fostering AT skills in preschoolers. Van Kleeck's publications include several edited books, more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles, and 25 book chapters. She has given 250 presentations nationally and internationally.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of University of Texas at Dallas
  • Receives research funding from University of Texas at Dallas as Callier Research Scholar
  • Receives royalties from Plural Publishing and Brookes Publishing
  • Consultant for Southern Methodist University

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Language & literacy expert for Dallas Independent School District
  • Faculty affiliate for UTD Center for Children & Families
  • Editorial board member/reviewer for many professional journals
  • Unpaid consultant to Educational Testing Service

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