American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Speech-Language Pathology Education Summit Proceedings

February 1–4, 2007, New Orleans, LA

Chair: Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., ASHA Vice President for Quality of Service in Speech-Language Pathology with Nancy Creaghead, Celia Hooper, Jennifer Watson, and Lemmietta McNeilly

Introduction

by Tommie L. Robinson, Jr.

The 2007 Speech-Language Pathology Summit, sponsored by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), was titled "The Subject Is Change: Creating a Vision for the Future Education of Speech-Language Pathologists." More than 120 academicians, clinicians, researchers, and early interventionists representing a variety of settings participated in this summit.

Along with ASHA, the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CAPCSD), the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA), and the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CFCC) were actively engaged in the planning process.

Participants were brought together to answer four critical questions:

  1. What are the historical, current, and emerging contexts, challenges, and opportunities for consideration as we prepare the future speech-language pathologist?
  2. Given our understanding of the evolving profession, what is the ideal speech-language pathologist of the future?
  3. How can we prepare the ideal speech-language pathologist of the future?
  4. What are possible models for educating future speech-language pathologists?

The 2½-day conference assembled academicians and clinicians to explore, develop, and extend paradigms for the preparation of successful speech-language pathologists. Participants were introduced to each topic by a keynote speaker who presented a question for discussion. Then the participants were divided into breakout groups for discussions on each of the questions. Each group was led by a member of the planning team, and each group had a trained recorder. At the end of each discussion, participants were encouraged to identify the major highlights, which were then consolidated by a facilitator and presented to the group.

Following are the proceedings of the Speech-Language Pathology Summit. We hope that they will facilitate ongoing discussions. You will note that the information presented does not stand alone. It is important to look at the speaker's presentation or the specific topic prior to examining the results of the individual questions.

As with any endeavor like this, there is a need to express thanks to a variety of individuals whose concerted efforts made this massive undertaking possible. ASHA Presidents Dolores Battle, Alex Johnson, and Noma Anderson provided insight into the development of this summit and major support for its success. The members of the planning group—Stephanie Davidson and Lemmietta McNeilly (ASHA), Nancy Alacon, Celia Hooper, and James Mahshie (CAPCSD), Lee Ann Golper and Jennifer Watson (CAA), Nancy Creaghead (CFCC), and Paul Gatson (facilitator)—are some of the finest people with whom I have ever worked. Their out-of-the-box thinking and kind energy made it a joy to chair this group. The speakers were also outstanding. Danielle Ripich, Paula Curie, Joe Melcher, Lee Ann Golper, Emily Homer, Judy Rudebusch, John Bernthal, and Gloria Kellum kept us on the edge of our seats with their outstanding communication styles and insightful information. A big "thanks" also goes to the recorders and National Office staff.

It is our hope that this information will help to provide support to our academic community and the organizations with vested interests in preparing the speech-language pathologist of the future, so that the subject is always open and that there is constant vision and discussion centered around how to make clinicians better and ready to meet the challenges of a demanding society.

Question 1

What are the historical, current, and emerging contexts, challenges, and opportunities for consideration as we prepare the future speech-language pathologist?

Question 2

Given our understanding of the evolving profession, what is the ideal speech-language pathologist of the future?

Question 3

How can we prepare the ideal speech-language pathologist of the future?

Question 4

What are possible models for educating future speech-language pathologists?

Evaluation

Summary

Suggestions to Enhance and Improve the Summit

Other Topics that Participants Would Like to Discuss at an SLP Summit

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