Conference Faculty Audiology 2016: Collaborative Strategies for Students With Hearing Loss

Audiology - Online Conference Oct 2016Samuel R. Atcherson, PhD, CCC-A, received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Georgia and his doctorate at the University of Memphis. He is currently associate professor and interim director of audiology at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in consortium with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. He is author or co-author of more than 95 publications, including three books, 10 book chapters, and 31 peer-reviewed articles, and he has given more than 160 presentations around the U.S. and Canada. His research and clinical areas of interest include hearing assistive technologies, auditory electrophysiology, auditory processing disorders, audiologic rehabilitation, and health literacy. Atcherson is active in his state organization as former ArkSHA Treasurer and current Vice-President of Audiology and Hearing Services. He is a recipient of the 2011 ArkSHA Research Award, 2014 ArkSHA Audiology Award, and 2015 ArkSHA Adult Ambassador Award, and a 2014–2015 participant of the ASHA Leadership Development Program. He is a bilateral cochlear implant user and a long-time user of hearing aids and hearing assistive and access technologies.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Ivette Cejas, PhD, is the director of the Barton G. Kids Hear Now Cochlear Implant Family Resource Center and an assistant professor at the University of Miami Ear Institute. Cejas received her PhD in clinical psychology from Nova Southeastern University and is a licensed psychologist in the state of Florida. She completed her clinical internship at the Mailman Center for Child Development, where she specialized in pediatric psychology. Cejas is a well-known researcher in the area of pediatric cochlear implantation, publishing more than 20 articles/chapters and presenting at numerous conferences. Since 2004, she has been providing therapeutic services to children and families coping with a hearing loss diagnosis or co-morbid disorders. As part of the cochlear implant team she is involved with pre-implantation evaluations, assessment of cognitive functioning, and supportive therapy for families of children with hearing loss. She is an advocate for all children with hearing loss and organizes a mentoring program at UHealth to help prepare children and families for the journey of listening through cochlear implantation. She is on the AG Bell Board of Directors and is a member of the American Cochlear Implant Alliance.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of Barton G. Kids Hear Now Cochlear Implant Family Resource Center and University of Miami
  • MED-EL Pediatric Advisory Board
  • Consultant and research for Advanced Bionics

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Board of Directors of AG Bell Association

Tina Childress, MA, CCC-A, is an educational audiologist in the mainstream and residential school settings, a technology and social media aficionado, a late-deafened adult, and a bilateral cochlear implant recipient. With her unique perspective and passion for sharing information through social media, she is a sought-out presenter and adjunct lecturer to families and professionals on a variety of topics but especially hearing assistive technology, apps, cochlear implants, advocacy, and effective strategies for coping with hearing loss.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Demo equipment from Phonak, Puro, and ClearSounds
  • Apple stockholder

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of HLAA and ALDA

Kimberlee A. Crass, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and certified auditory-verbal therapist. She is the clinical education director of the Auditory-Based Intervention program in the department of audiology and speech pathology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Crass received her PhD from the University of South Carolina, where she also worked as an SLP and clinical supervisor. Her clinical and research interests include aural (re)habilitation, language and literacy, and listening and spoken language development.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Andrea Hillock Dunn, AuD, PhD, CCC-A, is an educational audiology consultant for the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Exceptional Children Division and an assistant professor in the division of speech and hearing sciences at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. Dunn's clinical and research interests include educational audiology, early hearing detection and intervention, newborn hearing screening, and auditory and audiovisual speech perception. She has authored numerous peer-reviewed articles and presented nationally on topics including the maturation of audiovisual speech perception and newborn hearing screening.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Clinical research grant funds from ASHA

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Jeanane M. Ferre, PhD, CCC-A, received her PhD in audiology from Northwestern University in 1984 and has been on the faculties of Northern Illinois University, Rush University, and Northwestern University. She is currently an adjunct faculty member at Rush University and Northwestern University. She has published several articles in refereed journals and given more than 250 presentations on CAP and CAPD at the local, state, national, and international levels. Her works include Processing Power—A Guide to CAPD Assessment and Treatment, The M3 Model for Treating Auditory Disorders in CAPD: Mostly Management, and Managing Auditory Processing Disorders in the Handbook of Clinical Audiology, 5th ed. Ferre is the co-author of the Differential Screening Test for Processing. She is currently in private practice in the Chicago metropolitan area, exclusively providing evaluation and treatment of central auditory processing disorder for children and adults. Ferre is a Fellow of the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the 1997 recipient of ISHA's Clinical Achievement Award, and a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2001), and she received Honors of the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association in 2007.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Royalties from Pro-Ed

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • ASHA member

Cheryl DeConde Johnson, EdD, provides consulting services regarding educational audiology and deaf education focusing on state service delivery and accountability systems through her practice, The ADEvantage. She also holds adjunct faculty appointments in audiology at the University of Colorado and the University of Northern Colorado and in deaf education at the University of Arizona. From 1997–2006, she was the statewide consultant for audiology and deaf education with the Colorado Department of Education and prior to that held positions as a school-based educational audiologist, an early intervention provider, and a coordinator of the Greeley, Colorado, public school program serving deaf and hard of hearing students. Johnson is co-author of the Educational Audiology Handbook, 2nd ed. (2012, Cengage Delmar Learning) and Educational Advocacy for Student who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (2013, Hands & Voices), as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Johnson has been a persistent advocate for effective communication access in the classroom for learners who are deaf and hard of hearing and others with auditory deficits, as well as the use of hearing assistance technologies.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Educational Audiology Association and chair of its advocacy committee 

Ryan McCreery, PhD, CCC-A, is the director of the Center for Audiology at Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. McCreery's work includes leadership of the Center for Audiology, which includes 18 clinical audiologists at four clinic locations in the Omaha area, as well as three research laboratories. He is also the director of the Audibility, Perception and Cognition Laboratory, where his research focuses on optimizing speech recognition and amplification for children who are hard of hearing.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of Boys Town National Research Hospital
  • Research grants from NIH/NIDCD and Oticon, Inc.
  • Consulting fees from the British Columbia Early Hearing Program

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Mary Ellen Nevins, EdD, is an experienced educator of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. She is a professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and is the director of the program in auditory-based instruction. Her recent work and publications regarding professional learning complement her long-standing work with children using listening technologies to learn to listen, talk, and read.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Jane Seaton, MS, CCC-A/SLP, has worked in a variety of settings, including hospitals, universities, state agencies, and schools. After leaving her job as an educational audiologist with an intermediate agency, she decided to devote her professional energies to serving families and infants with hearing loss. Seaton's belief has always been that this is the area of greatest impact for improving outcomes for students with hearing challenges, and newborn hearing screening has given these children greater opportunities for success than ever before. 

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Contractor for Georgia PINES (Parent Infant Network of Educational Services)
  • Royalties from Cengage Delmar Learning

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Georgia EHDI stakeholder
  • Georgia Pathway to Language and Literacy project partner
  • Member of AAA, AGBell Association, ASHA, EAA, and Hands & Voices

Joseph Smaldino, PhD, CCC-A, received his PhD from the University of Florida.  He is a professor emeritus at the University of Northern Iowa and Illinois State University and serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Tennessee and East Tennessee State University. His research areas are hearing aids, speech perception, and audiologic rehabilitation, but he has focused for the last 25 years on the effects of classroom acoustics on listening and learning.  He served on the American National Standards working groups that developed and subsequently revised a national classroom acoustic standard in 2002, 2009, and 2010 and helped to write several ASHA resources for professionals. He has published extensively in the area and is a long-standing advocate for desirable classroom acoustics and acoustic accessibility.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • ASHA member

Donna Fisher Smiley, PhD, CCC-A, is an educational audiologist and the coordinator for the Educational Audiology/Speech Pathology Resources for Schools (EARS) Program at Arkansas Children's Hospital. Smiley has practiced audiology in the areas of pediatrics and school-based audiology for 25 years. She has provided professional development related to school-based audiology services as well as conducted research in the area. Additionally, she co-authored a textbook, School-Based Audiology. She served as the Vice President for Audiology Practice on the ASHA Board of Directors from 2013–2015. Smiley received a BS degree in communication disorders from Henderson State University, an MS degree in audiology from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and a PhD in hearing science from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Royalties from Plural Publishing

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Past ASHA Board of Directors member
  • Planning committee for this conference

Kelly Nichols Starr, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, is a speech-language pathologist and a certified auditory-verbal therapist/listening and spoken language specialist at the University of Michigan's (U of M) Cochlear Implant Program. She received her bachelor's degree from Michigan State University and completed her master's in speech-language pathology at Wayne State University. Starr has presented nationally on various topics related to the development of listening and spoken language and auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. She participates in U of M's Sound Support Outreach Grant, supported by the State of Michigan and the University of Michigan Department of Otolarynglogy, providing outreach and lectures to educational professionals and students in the state of Michigan.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of University of Michigan Cochlear Implant Program

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • ASHA member

Linda Thibodeau, PhD, CCC-A, has been a professor at the University of Texas at Dallas in the audiology doctoral program since 1996. Thibodeau's research at the Advanced Hearing Research Center of the Callier Center for Communication Disorders involves evaluation of the speech perception of listeners with hearing loss and auditory processing problems as well as evaluation of amplification systems and hearing assistance technology to help those individuals. She teaches in the areas of amplification and pediatric and adult auditory rehabilitation and serves as a consultant to several school districts and hearing aid manufacturers. As part of her teaching, she provides opportunities for students to connect with couples and families who experience the challenges of hearing loss through weeklong workshops (SIARC) or weekend retreats (Camp CHAT). She has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, Deafness Research Foundation, National Organization of Hearing Research, Texas Medical Research Council, and the Office of Special Education for her research. Thibodeau has served as co-chair of the ANSI committee for Electroacoustic Evaluation of Hearing Assistive Devices/Systems and is past president of the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Honorarium from Phonak for speaking at workshops

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Anita Vereb, PhD, CCC-A, has a BS in deaf education, an MS in audiology, and a PhD in Educational Studies: Literacy, Language and Culture. Vereb is employed as an audiologist at the University of Michigan Health System. In addition to her clinical duties, she provides educational audiology consultant services to local school districts.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Sherri Vernelson, MEd, works for the NC Department of Public Instruction Exceptional Children Division and supervises the statewide Consultants for Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Vision Impairment. She is a teacher of the deaf, listening and spoken language specialist, certified auditory verbal educator. She has worked in public and private school settings since 1993.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Board member of the North Carolina AG Bell Association

Elizabeth Walker, PhD, CCC-A/SLP, is an assistant professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Iowa. She has been an investigator on several NIH-funded research grants, including the University of Iowa Cochlear Implant project, Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss study, and Complex Listening in School Age Children who are Hard of Hearing. Walker is the director of the Pediatric Audiology Lab at the University of Iowa. Her research focuses on pediatric aural habilitation, specifically examining malleable factors that relate to individual differences in speech perception and language outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of University of Iowa
  • Research grants from NIH/NIDCD

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Krista Yuskow, AuD, has her Doctor of Audiology from A.T. Still University and has more than 20 years of experience in the clinical and educational settings. Over the course of her career she has worked in several environments in California, New Zealand, and Canada, delivering audiological services to patients of all ages. Since 1999, Yuskow has been working at Edmonton Public Schools as an educational audiologist. Her career experience focuses on auditory access for children 2½ to 20 years of age with a more recent focus on the relationship between hearing loss and self-determination. She has held lecturer and instructor positions at the University of Alberta and Grant MacEwan University, and she continues to lecture extensively about educational audiology issues. Yuskow is an active member of the Educational Audiology Association and is the audiology consultant to a Kids with Cancer program (BrainWorks) that supports childhood cancer survivors in their home, school, and work environments. 

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employee of Edmonton Public Schools

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member and committee member of the Educational Audiology Association

Teresa Zwolan, PhD, CCC-A, is a professor and director of the Cochlear Implant Program at the University of Michigan. She received her PhD in audiology from Northwestern University and has worked at the University of Michigan since 1990. She is an adjunct faculty member in Wayne State University's AuD program, where she teaches a course on cochlear implants. She is actively involved in patient care, research, and administrative needs of the program. To date, more than 2,500 patients have received a cochlear implant at the University of Michigan. Zwolan has authored several papers on cochlear implants that focus on clinical management of children and adults and has authored several book chapters dealing with various topics related to cochlear implants.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Cochlear Americas advisory board member and receives consulting fees
  • Honorarium from Institute for Cochlear Implant Training

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • American Cochlear Implant Alliance volunteer

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