American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

When The Words Are: Rewarding Career

Speech-Language Pathology Highly Ranked Nationally

(Rockville, MD - March 5, 2012)  

Does being a speech-language pathologist interest you? You may want to give it some thought once you look at U.S. News and World Report's recently released Best Jobs of 2012, a leading career ranking.

Speech-language pathology ranked fourteenth among the top 25 jobs, third among social service jobs.

Deciding what to do in life often means looking at indicators like those U.S. News used to rank jobs: whether a field is projected to grow; whether its pay is competitive; and, whether job holders feel fulfilled.

"When speaking with professionals" in the social services category, U.S. News and World Report said, it "noticed a resounding theme. The majority of people who work in these occupations feel their job wasn't a choice, but rather a calling to positively affect other people's lives."

One recent very public example of speech-language professionals' impact is the remarkable recovery of speech by former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.

"If you have witnessed the positive difference speech-language pathologists make, you understand why they find their work so fulfilling," according to Shelly S. Chabon, PhD, CCC-SLP, President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Besides fulfillment, however, the career offers growth and stability. Data for 2011 show only 1% of ASHA member certified speech language pathologists and audiologists reported being unemployed and seeking employment—that at a time of national job scarcity.

The U.S. News & World Report ranking is available at: http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2012/02/27/the-best-25-jobs-of-2012-rankings.

For information about a career in speech-language pathology, visit: http://www.asha.org/careers/.

About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 145,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems including swallowing disorders.

###

Share This Page

Print This Page