Special Interest Group 19 - Speech Science

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Perspectives, SIG 19, Vol. 2, Part 1, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.1
1.0
These two articles provide affiliates with novel information relevant to speech science research and education. Alison Behrman discusses how “research into speech production and perception of nonnative speakers has contributed to increased understanding of how we measure and interpret intelligibility, as well as the role of intelligibility in clinical decision-making.” She provides a brief overview of indexes of intelligibility and a summary of some of the research on the relationship of intelligibility and accentedness in nonnative speakers. Jennifer Dalton and Louise Keegan describe “the application of speech analysis software to increase students’ ability to discriminate and identify distinct dialectal differences between two dialects of English, Southern-American accented English and Irish-accented English. Students utilized both auditory-perceptual as well as acoustic data to reveal their own perceptual biases.” They report that the students “contextualized their findings by identifying potential cultural influences that were predictive of the accent differences [and that students] reported that this experience increased their awareness of cultural and linguistic differences and served as a precursor to their development of clinical expertise in determining dialectal difference versus disorder in individuals with potential communication disorders.”
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$20.00 $16.00
Nonmember:
$26.00 $20.80
SIG 19 Affiliate:
$5.00
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Perspectives, SIG 19, Vol. 1, Part 1, 2016
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.15
1.5
These three articles provide affiliates with novel information relevant to speech science research and education. Turner et al. present their investigation into the relationship between different levels of background noise and articulatory contact pressure (ACP), the latter representing one aspect of physiological effort during speech production. They report that physiological effort as indexed by ACP did not increase with increasing intensity. They provide both a detailed methodology for researchers interested in replicating the study and clinical implications for professionals interested in employing ACP in therapeutic intervention. Finan and Meinke report on their development of an interdisciplinary (speech-language pathology, audiology, and music) undergraduate-level course covering the physics and biophysics of sound production and reception with emphasis on music and speech, which incorporates issues related to auditory and vocal injury prevention. They provide a detailed description of the course’s learning outcomes, structure, and projects. They conclude with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of implementing this interdisciplinary course for instructors and students. Boyce describes the different vocabulary/terminology traditions that have the potential to cause serious confusion in students’ understanding of key clinical concepts. The author discusses three of the many vocabulary conflicts she has encountered as a teacher of speech science to undergraduate and graduate students: resonance, constriction, and aspiration. She argues that advising students of vocabulary conflicts ahead of time reduces wrong answers on tests, enables instructors to unravel the source of vocabulary misunderstandings, and increases students’ mastery of speech science concepts.
Member:
$25.00 $20.00
Nonmember:
$33.00 $26.40
SIG 19 Affiliate:
$5.00
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