Special Interest Group 06 - Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics

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Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.2
2.0
The first article discusses how electrophysiological measures can supplement traditional audiometric evaluation in assessment of age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Perceptual consequences of ARHL in part, can be attributed to a reduced ability to accurately process temporal and frequency cues of speech. The frequency following response and cortical-auditory evoked potential measures may be used to identify deficits in the neural processing of speech and guide management of ARHL. The second article shares current evidence supporting an association between cognitive impairment and hearing loss. Research is ongoing to determine whether management of hearing loss with amplification devices and auditory rehabilitation reduces the risk for cognitive decline. The third article highlights a novel pharmaceutical intervention for ARHL. Specifically, the paper focused on AUT00063, a small molecule that modifies a critical ion channel, Kv3, involved in repolarization of a neural action potential within the central auditory pathway. The final article focuses on the aspects of cognition that are most relevant to behavioral auditory research and provides an overview of cognitive hearing science, auditory neuroscience, and electrophysiological measures ideal for studying how the brain processes speech.
Member:
$30.00
Nonmember:
$39.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.1
1.0
This Perspectives, shared two insightful articles that could influence clinical care decisions. The first article discussed the ambiguity in the diagnosis of an auditory processing disorder and what to consider when selecting a diagnostic test. This article defined the “gold standard” test and elaborated on diagnostic accuracy research. The second article detailed the prevalence and indicators of dementia. Research suggests that hearing loss is a potential modifiable factor for dementia. This article reviewed considerations for hearing assessment, counseling, and communicating with patients with dementia. Audiologists play an important role in differentiating communicative behaviors associated with hearing loss from those of dementia and can assist in optimizing hearing and safety of persons with dementia.
Member:
$20.00
Nonmember:
$26.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.1
1.0
This Perspectives focused on the current cochlear implant candidacy for adults with hearing impairment. We reviewed factors such as bilateral implantation, bimodal stimulation, surgical improvements, MRI compatibility, insurance coverage, and cosmetic considerations. We discussed the benefit of preserving low-frequency hearing loss with the hybrid/electro-acoustic cochlear implant. Moreover, we examined potential contributors for loss of residual acoustic hearing with hybrid/electro-acoustic cochlear implantation in a subset of patients. Etiologies such as mechanical damage to cochlear structures, inflammation and apoptosis of hair cells, and alterations to blood flow were discussed. Audiologists should stay informed on implantable solutions to hearing loss and should recommend cochlear implant evaluation for patients that fit the expanded candidacy criteria.
Member:
$20.00
Nonmember:
$26.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 2, Part 1, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.25
2.5
This Perspectives highlighted research on assessments of cochlear hair cells and middle ear function. We examined measurement techniques used to separate the transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) response from the stimulus, and discussed how the nonlinear differential and the double-source, double-evoked techniques affect TEOAE characteristics. The significance of measuring the short latency component of the TEOAE was discussed. We explored the effects of oxaliplatin, cisplatin, and carboplatin on objective and subjective high-frequency auditory measures in adults. We shared how distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAEs) and ultra-high frequency, pure-tone audiometry can be used to obtain a more comprehensive hearing profile and treatment plan for adults receiving platinum chemotherapies. Finally, we reviewed standard single- and multi-frequency tympanometry measures and wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measurements, including wideband energy reflectance and wideband absorbance tympanometry. Normative and pathological findings WAI findings were shared. More detailed middle-ear assessments can be used as a screening and a diagnostic tool for middle ear disorders and for newborn hearing screening. Audiologists should include otoacoustic emission testing and multifrequency and wideband tympanometry in their clinical “toolkits.”
Member:
$35.00
Nonmember:
$46.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 1, Part 2, 2016
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.15
1.5
This Perspectives focused on cognition and hearing abilities in adults. We shared how working memory capacity and attention should be considered when selecting and programming amplification and providing aural rehabilitation for individuals with hearing loss. Individuals with higher working memory capacity are able to utilize fast-acting compression settings to aid in speech understanding in complex listening environments, while those with lower working memory can experience negative repercussions from such settings. Additionally, clinicians can counsel on cognitive effects on speech understanding and involve top-down strategies in their auditory training. We also examined the effects of aging on psychoacoustic performance, noting an association between cognition and discrimination abilities in older adults. Factors like impaired temporal processing and reduced frequency selectivity impact hearing abilities of adult clients in the clinic, but are rarely assessed in a standard hearing evaluation. Finally, we examine why pure-tone threshold testing is insufficient at predicting hearing handicap in the adults with minimal to mild hearing loss, and how to assess which of these individuals would benefit from rehabilitation and/or amplification. Factors such as previous noise exposure, age, working memory, ability to use conversational context, and speed of auditory processing are important to consider.
Member:
$25.00
Nonmember:
$33.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 1, Part 1, 2016
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
ASHA CEUs:
0.1
1.0
This Perspectives focused on minimal to mild hearing loss in infants and children. We summarized how mild transient hearing loss, when induced during a developmental critical period, can cause lingering impairment in auditory perception. An animal model was used to study how hearing loss affected cellular mechanics and processing in the auditory cortex, and how these changes resulted in perceptual deficits. We shared the current opinion on implications of minimal to mild permanent hearing loss (MMHL) in children, and how to determine the optimal management approach. Use of FM systems for MMHL and fitting recommendations were discussed. Finally, we presented how to determine whether hearing amplification is appropriate for an infant with mild bilateral hearing loss and discussed recommendations for fitting the hearing aids. We discussed additional factors of concomitant handicap, mobility considerations, listening environment, and family readiness and motivation, which should be considered when determining the optimal hearing management approach for an infant with mild bilateral hearing loss.
Member:
$20.00
Nonmember:
$26.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00

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