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CE Courses / 0.25 - 0.3 ASHA CEUs

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Dysphagia and Continuum of Care
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) include a variety of topics in dysphagia across the age continuum and across the many settings that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) address dysphagia. Parker Huston, Robert Dempster, and Lauren Garbacz provide readers with an overview of common evidence-based psychological techniques used in the treatment of adolescents with feeding disorders, including motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral techniques. The goal of this paper is to provide a high-level overview of these concepts so that providers outside of psychology may utilize some of these techniques in therapy, when referral to a behavioral specialist or psychologist is not feasible. Next, authors Lauren Madhoun and Robert Dempster discuss the psychosocial aspects of feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit NICU and immediately following NICU discharge. Joanne Patterson extends the discussion to the adult population by describing a biopsychosocial intervention that combines cognitive behavioral with dysphagia therapy, termed Cognitive-Behavioral Enhanced Swallowing Therapy (CB-EST) and its application in managing head and neck cancer patients with dysphagia. Finally, authors Kortney Eng, Maria Jose Flores, Elisabeth Gerrity, Nupur Sinha, Katherine Imbeau, Laddie Erbele, and Cary Yeh share details from their study investigating the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on swallow physiology in healthy adults. We hope these articles will be of significant value to practicing clinicians and to students learning about dysphagia.
Global Initiatives: Considerations for Best Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles discuss different aspects of international practice, including work with immigrant and refugee families. Baigorri, Crowley, and Bukari provide a service delivery model for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and professionals working in low-and middle-income countries. Chakraborty, Schwarz, and Vaughan discuss a major consideration for ASHA to cultivate cultural sensitivity and competence in its largely female (95.30%), monolingual (93.46%) and white (92.10%) workforce. Chu et al., discuss the challenges that SLPs face when providing speech and language therapy in Malaysia and issues that need to be addressed for continued growth of this profession. Maldonado, Ashe, Bubar, and Chapman explore the experiences of monolingual, American, English-speaking SLPs and Clinical Fellows who worked with immigrant and refugee families within a preschool context. Staley et al., consider the literature on international student placements to contextualize and describe a 10-year relationship which enabled speech language pathology students in their final year of study at a Canadian university to complete a 10-week clinical placement with a non-governmental organization in Kenya.
Use of Technology to Assess  Speech Production and Voice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 19) articles provide with information relevant to speech science research and education. Lulich and Pearson present two demonstrations in this technical report to illustrate the utility of 3D/4D ultrasound technology. First, the authors report that “not only can structures be imaged which previously were impossible to identify from 2D ultrasound alone (e.g., piriform sinuses and posterior pharyngeal wall), but questions involving non-sagittal structures and asymmetrical tongue shapes, such as the pervasiveness and extensiveness of lateral contact between the tongue and the palate-teeth, can now be addressed non-invasively.” Second, they also conclude that “the fusion of ultrasound data with MRI images further enhances the utility of 3D/4D ultrasound, since it combines the strengths of ultrasound with the complementary strengths of the other modality, while mitigating the weaknesses of each.” Richardson et al., compare various acoustical measures of sustained vowels obtained using the Multidimensional Voice Program (MDVP) by Computerized Speech Lab, Praat, and TF32. Results show that the MDVP yield significantly higher values of standard deviation of fundamental frequency, jitter, and shimmer, and significantly lower values of noise-to-harmonics ratio compared to the other programs. They discuss the variation of numerical values across programs and the resulting clinical implications. Hagedorn et al. discuss the benefits of a collaboration among engineers, speech scientists, and clinicians which yield “the development of biologically inspired technology that has been proven useful for both small- and large-scale analysis,” a better understanding of speech production, and the development of assessment tools with a clinical benefit and interdisciplinary reach. They also review the use of real-time magnetic resonance imaging across clinical populations and discuss the challenges associated with collaborative work. Lee and Fischer reveal an association between acoustic vowel space and the severity of dysarthria. They review sex differences, factors that may affect formant-related measures, and clinical implications.
Issues in the School Setting
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 16) addresses important issues for the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in working in the school setting, including assessing bilingual students, grammar interventions for school-aged students, the comfort level of SLPs when working with students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and the impact of professional development on literacy knowledge and practice.
Evaluation and Management of Challenging Patient  Populations in Audiology
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles focus on diagnostic tools and considerations for management of several challenging patient populations in audiology. The first article discusses utilizing magnetic resonance imaging to determine the functional and structural neural alterations associated with chronic tinnitus. Researchers are utilizing advanced imaging techniques to study variability in perceptual characteristics and reaction to tinnitus. The second article discusses the continuum of disorders known as “cortical hearing impairment,” supported by a comprehensive summary of clinical presentations. Despite its rarity, an audiologist must understand etiologies of cortical hearing impairment and know how to evaluate and characterize the accompanied hearing difficulty. The third article examines the effects of concussion of the vestibular system and presented an assessment battery for athletes postconcussion and for determining return to play.
Cultural Competence, Adult Bilingual Fluency, and LGBTQ Clients
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 14) articles topics include (a) the effects of an experiential learning opportunity on undergraduates’ cultural competence; (b) a description of an LGBTQ content module that can be integrated into coursework on cultural and linguistic diversity; and (c) fluency strategies for treating bilingual adults who stutter.
Pediatric Auditory Brainstem Implants, Adult Single-Sided Deafness, and Teaching
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 9) articles include topics on evidence, research, and application about pediatric auditory brainstem implants, teaching phonological awareness in young children, and development of The Assessment and Aural Rehabilitation Tool for single-sided deafness in adults.
Topics in Aural Rehabilitation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 7) articles address therapy, patient education/counseling, and novel eHealth programs to serve clients across the lifespan. The topic of multisensory integration is addressed with a review of cognitive neuroscience literature and recommendations are made for therapy protocols for infants and children with hearing loss. There is a review of the development and outcomes of a multimedia education program for adults with hearing loss. The use of eHealth in patient-centered care for adults with hearing loss is considered for current practice and its future directions. Authors discuss considerations for the use of remote microphone technology by the oldest generation of patients. Finally, patient-centered strategies for communication during audiology consultations are presented to build trust and positive therapeutic relationships.
Neurobiology of Language
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on neurobiological factors associated with language learning. The first article describes a model of causation by which environmental factors influence neural and cognitive development. The second article examines learning contexts and their impact on verb learning. The third article discusses early motor deficits and their relationship to speech/language outcomes, and the final article reviews morphological processing in normal and clinical populations.
AAC Considerations for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles review and present current issues related to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) across different patient populations, as well as identifies and discusses team-based interprofessional practice approaches for managing individuals with complex communication needs within both pediatric and adult populations. In the first article, Shannon Taylor, Sarah Jane Wallace, and Sarah Elizabeth Wallace explore factors that influence successful use of high-technology AAC in persons with poststroke aphasia via a literature review and narrative synthesis methodology. Lori Marra and Katie Micco present a clinical focus article that assesses communication partner’s perception regarding the effectiveness of a training model to support AAC use within a parent–adolescent communication pair. Michelle Westley, Dean Sutherland, and H. Timothy Bunnell examine the experience of healthy voice donors during the ModelTalker voice banking process for New Zealand-accent synthesized voices. Sarah Diehl and Michael de Reisthal describe the complex symptoms associated with Huntington’s disease and how they influence implementation of AAC to address the communication needs of this population. Kristen Abbott-Anderson, Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou, and Brooke N. Burk address interprofessional practice via a multidisciplinary patient-centered engagement experience entitled Spring EngAGEment that serves individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease or other associated dementias. Finally, Laura Hinkes Molinaro, and Wendy Stellpflug discuss a team approach for education and support of patients and families with postoperative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome.
Current Issues in Dysphagia Management
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study emphasizes clinical decision-making in swallowing and dysphagia management. The articles focus on using data to make clinical decisions, finding noninvasive ways to screen healthy adults, and patient-reported side effects and tolerability of a specific assessment technique.
Interprofessional Education and Practice SIG 2
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles evaluate, highlight, and analyze various examples of interprofessional education and collaboration amongst speech-language pathologists and other professionals. Interprofessional educational models, collaborative teaming frameworks, and a case study example are also presented.
High-Resolution Pharyngeal Manometry in Dysphagia SIG 13
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles discuss the use of high-resolution pharyngeal manometry in the assessment and treatment of dysphagia in pediatrics and adults. Additionally, we present an educational piece discussing considerations in clinical decision-making concerning the initiation of safe oral alimentation in patients on high-flow nasal cannula.
Patient Care and Management for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study focuses on several aspects of patient care and management for practitioners who serve children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The articles, originally published in a 2014 issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, discuss the unique needs of children with mild, minimal, and/or unilateral hearing loss; the effects of fatigue on children with hearing loss; and the importance of monitoring speech-language performance and progress as well as hearing aid use in this population.
Clinical and Research Implications for School-Based Services SIG 16
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles address important issues for the speech-language pathologist working in the school setting. Topics include fostering preschoolers’ emergent literacy, supporting children with traumatic brain injury, collaborating with school psychologists, and providing classroom-based services in middle school.
Cultivating Student Success Through Effective Service Delivery
Format(s): Streaming Video
School-based SLPs strive to support their students’ success in school. Two critical components of fostering academic success are: (1) provision of services that address the curriculum and (2) collaboration with teachers to make that happen. This video course will present strategies to address both of these essential activities in the context of elementary, middle, and high school settings, including examples of effective collaboration and ideas for overcoming common barriers.
Research Highlights in Audiology: 2017
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2017 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) a discussion of the economic impact of hearing loss in the U.S., (2) ways to improve museum accessibility for people with hearing loss, (3) how improvements in early detection of hearing loss has impacted children’s literacy outcomes, and (4) the impact of an audiologist’s language on hearing aid uptake.
Complex Considerations for Speech Sound Disorders in the School Setting
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 1) focus on the complexities of identifying and characterizing speech sound disorder in children and adolescents within the school setting. Articles discuss best practices for selecting tests and using developmental norms and criterionreferenced measures to arrive at more accurate diagnoses. Guidelines for determining eligibility for treatment are addressed, including provisions for social and educational impact, and several clinical scenarios are included.
Focusing on Life Participation for Individuals With Aphasia
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes three recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia.” These sessions include practical tips for creating personalized assessments and interventions to improve the everyday experiences of individuals with aphasia. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, giving a comprehensive view of the current landscape of aphasia intervention as well as related subjects, including medical management, neuroplasticity, life participation, assessment, and more. Sessions explored practical treatment strategies to meet the needs of patients across the severity spectrum and in various treatment settings, as well as the unique needs of a range of patient subgroups.
Topics in Aphasia Management
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes three recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia.” These sessions discuss best practices for medical management, addressing cognitive impairments, and supporting patient care for individuals with aphasia. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, giving a comprehensive view of the current landscape of aphasia intervention as well as related subjects, including neuroplasticity, life participation, assessment, and more. Sessions explored practical treatment strategies to meet the needs of patients across the severity spectrum and in various treatment settings, as well as the unique needs of a range of patient subgroups.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles focus on language intervention progress monitoring for elementary students and for adolescents specifically while producing narratives and while learning morphologically complex words. The authors also address the psychometric requirements of oral and written language progress monitoring assessments. Research and theory are tied to practical clinical application with specific examples.
The Subtle Presentation of Autism: Core Features, Gender Differences, Motivation, and Self-Regulation
Format(s): Streaming Video
In this presentation, Donna Henderson will discuss the core features of autism as they present in children and adolescents with subtle manifestations of symptoms. She will also focus on the particular challenge of recognizing autism in girls. Then William Stixrud will discuss the motivational and self-regulatory challenges experienced by students with a mild presentation of autism and will emphasize the importance of supporting the development of autonomy.
Perspectives, SIG 10, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The first article discusses a feasibility study to determine whether brief, recorded teaching modules would increase the use of evidence-based vocabulary instruction by undergraduate clinicians. The second article consists of a study designed to develop a method for assessing speech-language pathology author impact as a function of institution and comparing the results to recent college rankings of speech-language pathology graduate programs. The final article describes the development of an elective course on electroencephalographic research methods designed to encourage Master of Science students to pursue academic and research careers in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, the authors explore augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) that are bilingual and use English as a second language. Authors also reflect on the cultural and diverse children that use AAC. McNamara considers the established research in bilingualism in the typically developing population and those with speech language disorders to propose guidelines for best practice in bilingual AAC. Yu reviews topics that include studies comparing the developmental outcomes between monolingual and bilingual children on the autism spectrum and studies on the role of home language development in English acquisition. The purpose of Mindel and John’s article is to increase the competency of school-based speech language pathologists who are increasingly working with culturally and linguistically diverse student populations using AAC. Johnston, O’Neill, and Schumann’s article provides interventionists with a strategy for comparing the efficiency of initial graphic symbol acquisition in an individual’s first and second language for English language learners who use AAC during functional communication training. McNamara considers the established research in bilingualism in the typically developing population and those with speech language disorders to propose guidelines for best practice in bilingual AAC. Wagner outlines some commonly heard questions and concerns professional and families share with regards to bilingual AAC intervention and shares some resources for selecting, customizing, and designing robust bilingual AAC system, strategies for teaching core words each month and ways to incorporate both paper-based and electronic-based AAC tools. Solomon-Rice and Soto discuss project scholars who receive evidence-based training in AAC assessment, AAC intervention, collaborative teaming, AAC applications supporting the language and literacy of culturally and linguistically diverse children, and professional development in collaborate AAC settings.
Perspectives, SIG 16, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles address important issues for the speech-language pathologist in working in the school setting, including using curriculum-based evaluations, a district-university collaboration allowing for working within the classroom, a team response to intervention approach for phonological disorders, and interprofessional practice in the school setting.
Perspectives, SIG 4, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Articles focused on three topics: (a) a case study of fluency strategies for hypokinetic dysarthria that was exacerbated by subthalamic nucleus brain stimulation, (b) clinical outcomes for adolescents and adults in an intensive stuttering clinic, and (c) a study of student clinicians who stutter. All of the articles discussed positive outcomes for people who stutter, highlighting the diverse experiences that people who stutter may experience to lead to positive outcomes.
Services for Bilingual Children With Highly Unintelligible Speech
Format(s): Streaming Video
This video program provides comprehensive information about identifying, assessing, and treating bilingual children ages 3–11 who have highly unintelligible speech. The presenter discusses case studies and current research to provide concrete solutions to common challenges such as figuring out where to begin when providing services, identifying bilingual children at-risk for other concomitant deficiencies, differentiating language difference vs. disorder, and selecting the most effective treatments.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This articles focus on contemporary issues regarding African American English (AAE) in children and adolescents across the school-age years. Articles discuss inherent challenges of the “language differences” paradigm and provide new lenses through which to view cultural, social, and pragmatic aspects of AAE. Specialized topics such as theory of mind, speech acts, and cultural-linguistic features of AAE are given special attention in this issue.
Special Considerations for Children With Feeding and Swallowing Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Feeding and swallowing problems in children take many forms and are often intertwined with other aspects of a child’s development. This journal self-study explores some of these interactions, including the relationship between feeding and swallowing disorders and language impairment, as well as connections between hearing and feeding/ swallowing. The self-study also includes information on how mealtime duration relates to severity of feeding and swallowing problems in children with cerebral palsy, as well as how a family-centered intervention can address mealtime behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Clinicians will be able to immediately apply the information in these articles to improve management of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, authors explore collaboration between different professionals including speech language pathologists (SLPs), behavior analysts, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and special educators. One author familiarizes SLPs with key behavior analytic terms and principles as they relate to practices in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This paper also lists specific considerations for AAC intervention as guided by the behavior analytic terms and principles discussed. In another article, the author presents a collaborative decision-making framework that can help guide public school intervention teams through data-driven program decisions and assure effective interventions for learners who require AAC. Another paper explores a single case study of a young man with Autism who exhibits personal gains due to ongoing assessment and the collaboration of team members. An additional article addresses the underlying methodology in the treatment of AAC from both the behavioral and speech language pathology research. In this article, interprofessional concepts are introduced and conceptualization of teamwork is provided and illustrated through a case example.
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Effects of Lingual Strengthening on Swallowing
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Research into programmed isometric lingual exercise in order to improve swallow function has yielded promising results. This journal self-study examines evidence related to this relatively new therapeutic approach. The first article in this self-study offers a review of the recent literature on isometric lingual tasks across a variety of populations and includes clinical implications based on the findings. The second and third articles are normative studies about adults without diagnosed dysphagia. One explores how tongue strengthening affects mealtime functioning in older, long-term care residents, while the other examines relationships between performance variability, isometric strength, swallowing pressure, age, and gender.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives focused on language sample analysis (LSA) in children and adolescents across the school-age years. Articles discussed methods for collecting, analyzing, and using language samples to aid practitioners in differential diagnosis, selecting intervention goals, and monitoring progress. Specialized topics such as African American English, social pragmatic disorder, and LSA for written language samples are given special attention and several case studies are included.
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed a variety of service delivery and training models in Zambia, Cambodia, India, and Rwanda respectively. The overarching concept of international interprofessional education and practice is demonstrated through the various approaches to education, clinical training, and service delivery
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 2, Part 4, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed special issues for speech-language pathologists serving English language learners with language and literacy needs, and included information and strategies for promoting language and literacy skills in preschoolers, early elementary, and special populations such as those with autism spectrum disorders.
Perspectives, SIG 2, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed the clinical management of adult neurogenic communication disorders in a diverse aging world. Topics covered included decolonizing speech-language pathology practice in adult neurogenic communication disorders, speech-langue pathology services for Chinese-speaking people with aphasia, mild cognitive impairment in Hispanic and African America adults, neurocognitive control deficits for bilingual adults with aphasia, neuroimaging in the treatment of bilingual neurogenic communication disorders, and interprofessional practice in the neurorehabilitation of Hispanic/Latino populations.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed literacy impairments—-both reading and writing, in school-age children; emphasized the role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) through case study in each issue; and specialized topics such as foster care and bilingualism are also given special attention.
Perspectives, SIG 10, Vol. 2, Part 1, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In this Part of Perspectives, Bellon-Harn and Weinbaum discuss recruiting students from diverse populations. Dalton, Klein, and Botts describe the use of scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) when teaching best practice. The development of strategies for graduate student funding is explored with Anjum and Nagaraj. Edwards and Dukhovny describe technology training for speech-language pathology students, particularly with regard to tables and apps. Finally, Krimm, Schuele, and Brame discuss the use of online learning for ensuring foundational skills in speech-language pathology.
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 2, Part 1, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives focused on international collaboration in terms of sustainability, competencies, ethics, and an understanding of how to apply prevalence (specifically how it applies to cluttering with general information that is applicable across settings and disorders). A specific project that supports these key concepts is also discussed in the article on cross-linguistic phonological development. Clinical training and practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists (AuDs) in SA in the areas of health, primary, and tertiary education pre- and post-apartheid is also discussed.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed the relationship between language impairment and dyslexia, described treatments for struggling readers, and introduced theoretical frameworks useful when working with this population. Research and theory are tied to practical clinical application with specific examples and case studies.
Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability
Format(s): Journal (Online)
In this journal self-study, which includes articles from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum, authors address the problem of declining reading comprehension in the United States. The lead article argues that reading comprehension is complex and multidimensional, varying based on reader ability, text, and task. The remaining articles focus on the implications of this view, including ideas related to assessment, intervention, and the critical role SLPs play in evaluating and addressing reading comprehension difficulties.
Best Seller
Treating Childhood and Adolescent Voice Disorders
Format(s): Streaming Video
Childhood and adolescent voice disorders are observed in multiple clinical settings, with many professionals having limited background or education to properly treat them. Pediatric voice disorders can have adverse effects on children and teens in classroom and social situations. This video course provides a plethora of practical information based on research and practice in a major pediatric hospital setting. Vocal hygiene, vocal function exercises, semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, and other specific techniques are discussed.
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Cranial Nerve Examination for the SLP
Format(s): Streaming Video
A thorough cranial nerve examination is an essential part of the speech-language pathologist’s evaluation of every patient. When performed, it is useful in the diagnosis of speech and swallowing disorders, and accurate diagnosis is crucial for development of a targeted, individualized treatment plan. This video course provides an overview of the neuroanatomy and physiology of the cranial nerve examination. Participants will receive detailed instructions for testing and interpreting findings of the cranial nerve examination. The course also describes common abnormalities observed for patients with impairment of cranial nerve function.
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New Directions for Auditory Training
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Technological advances have led to a number of options for auditory training for individuals with hearing loss. This self-study, based on articles from a research forum published in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, looks at contemporary issues in auditory training to assist clinicians in developing therapeutic programs that better target individual needs and aid generalization. The first article summarizes a useful framework in which to view developments in auditory training. Two articles examine ways to effectively individualize training materials so that clients will make the most gains in treatment. Finally, a fourth article considers a number of factors that may help clinicians predict who will benefit most from these interventions.
Best Seller
Interventions to Improve Young Children’s Early Literacy Skills
Format(s): Streaming Video
Young children with communication impairments, especially language disorders, face elevated risks in developing reading problems. SLPs play an important role in helping young children with language disorders develop foundational literacy skills that can enhance their literacy and reading trajectories. This video course provides evidence-based guidance on how to modify treatment to improve the foundational literacy skills of young children with language disorders.
Enhancing AAC for Adults
Format(s): Journal (Online)
People with severe communication disorders often benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). As technology has advanced and people have become more comfortable using a wide variety of programs, patient expectations about how AAC systems look and feel have also increased. In addition, programs and tools that are used daily, such as Facebook and Twitter, provide alternative communication options for people who have difficulty with face-to-face interactions. This journal self-study explores preferences about topics and types of visual supports as well as information about how people who use AAC can expand their communication using social media. Clinicians working with adults who use AAC can apply this information to improve decisions about methods and types of communication supports and maximize patient success.
Best Seller
Reading and Interpreting Videofluoroscopic Studies: A Tutorial
Format(s): Streaming Video
An information-rich videofluoroscopic assessment can help clinicians determine which components of the complex oropharyngeal swallow need to be targeted for intervention. Visualizing all of the elements that contribute to a well-integrated or disordered swallow mechanism requires an ordered and disciplined review. This video course will demonstrate methods to enhance clinicians' ability to perform a videofluoroscopic assessment and discern the discrete elements of the oropharyngeal swallow. Participants will then practice determining the integrity or disorder of the swallow mechanism by viewing and interpreting case study video.
Interprofessional Management of Dementia: Maximizing Functional Outcomes
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes three recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference "Maximizing Functional Outcomes for Patients With Dementia." These sessions focus on working with all the stakeholders involved in treating patients with dementia – the individual, family members and other caregivers, and all the health care professionals involved in the person’s care. Sessions discuss caregiver counseling and support, helping patients with hearing loss, and a specific model for interdisciplinary care. The conference included a total of 13 sessions, with the broad goal of describing a range of evidence-based clinical care techniques to get to the heart of patient-centered dementia care.
Counseling and Support for Students With Hearing Loss
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes two recorded sessions from the online conference “Audiology 2016: Collaborative Strategies for Students With Hearing Loss.” These sessions focus on the transition from secondary school settings to post-secondary and vocational settings, counseling for self-advocacy, and social and emotional outcomes in children and teens with hearing loss. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, with the broad goal of providing practitioners practical, outcome-driven strategies, new information, and resources to help bridge the gap between children and teens with hearing loss, their families, and the educational and medical providers who support them. The two sessions in this course are:
Best Seller
Management of Communication and Swallowing Impairments Related to Artificial Airways
Format(s): Streaming Video
Endotracheal tubes, tracheostomy tubes, and ventilator dependency can have adverse effects on communication and swallowing. SLPs who take the lead role in remediating these impairments need to have the knowledge and skills to provide appropriate, safe, and evidence-based interventions. This streaming video course is designed for the SLP who has an interest in post-extubation dysphagia and in communication and swallowing challenges associated with tracheostomy tubes and ventilator dependency. The course will review the literature and present a “how-to” guide for managing these medically complex patients. Medical SLPs will walk away with strategies to best manage their patients who are experiencing complications due to artificial airways.
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The Best Fit: Selecting a Targeted Aphasia Intervention
Format(s): Streaming Video
With all the developments and changes in aphasia therapy, clinicians can have difficulty keeping abreast of the latest and greatest tools and techniques to ensure they are selecting the best evidence-based treatment option to fit a particular client’s needs and language abilities. This video course uses the ASHA Practice Portal and other resources to explore case studies and apply aphasia interventions to achieve functional goals for adults of all ages. The course identifies candidacy requirements for numerous aphasia interventions, reviews the procedures for using them, and discusses how to fit them into required goal statements and outcome measures.
Adult Swallowing Safety: Impact of Changes to Feeding and Swallowing Processes
Format(s): Journal (Online)
SLPs employ many strategies when working with adults to address feeding and swallowing disorders. From evaluation through treatment, SLPs must consider the impact of alterations to foods, liquids, positioning, and more on swallowing efficiency and safety. This journal self-study investigates what impact the addition of barium to a bolus during a videofluoroscopic swallowing study has on swallowing behaviors; exactly what happens to the swallowing process when the chin-down posture is employed as a compensatory strategy; and how assisted feeding may affect swallowing. Clinicians will come away with a much better explanation of the physiological and functional changes that occur when they make bolus, head position, or feeding situation changes. The articles make specific recommendations about the appropriateness of the chin-down posture for specific types of patients, depending on the difficulties they are having during the swallow. Practical suggestions also are made for how to address some of the problems that are introduced by feeding assistance.
Best Seller
Evaluating and Enhancing Children’s Phonological Skills: A Systematic Approach
Format(s): Streaming Video
This session will examine how SLPs can better manage children with highly unintelligible speech who are making very slow progress. This presentation will provide a framework for evaluating and enhancing optimal phonological patterns.
Best Seller
Autism Spectrum Disorders: Interventions for Communication and Learning
Format(s): Streaming Video
This course provides SLPs with a framework to aid them in planning appropriate, contextually valid, and evidence-based interventions for the growing population of children with autism spectrum disorders. Using two case examples, the course presents an array of strategies for selecting learning priorities and targets that truly make a functional difference in a child’s life. We also discuss connections to school standards and how to modify strategies for children of various ages. The course also includes a brief discussion of new and old diagnostic systems and their possible impact on practice.
Improve Older Adults’ Communication Through Memory Mining
Format(s): eWorkshop
There is a pressing need for creative, therapeutic approaches that appeal to a culturally and linguistically diverse population of older adults. One such approach is memory mining, a developmentally and culturally appropriate intervention strategy that can increase the communicative engagement of older adults with cognitive-communicative challenges. This presentation provides a foundation for understanding age-related demographic, cognitive, and linguistic changes and how memory mining, also known as facilitated reminiscence, can lead to better communication outcomes for this population.
Best Seller
Language Assessment of Bilingual Children: Evidence and Implications
Format(s): Streaming Video
This program focuses on core principles and procedures that guide valid language assessments with developing bilingual children aged 3-12. Developing bilinguals are operationally defined within the U.S. as children who have consistent experiences with languages other than, or in addition to, English.
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Management of Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing
Format(s): Streaming Video
This program will focus on problem solving to facilitate safe, efficient, and developmentally appropriate feeding and swallowing in children from infancy to 10 years of age. Using the principles discussed in the program, along with case studies and examples, you will learn how to take a holistic approach to each child in systematically planning an appropriate intervention.

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