Summary of the Systematic Review

Article Citation

Telepractice in the Assessment and Treatment of Individuals With Aphasia: A Systematic Review

Hall, N., Boisvert, M., et al. (2013).
International Journal of Telerehabilitation, 5(1), 27-38.
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Sponsoring Body

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Article Quality Ratings

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Indicators of Review Quality

  • No The review states a clearly focused question/aim.
  • Yes Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided.
  • Yes Search strategy described in sufficient detail for replication.
  • No Included studies are assessed for study quality.
  • No Quality assessments are reproducible.
  • Yes Characteristics of the included studies are provided.

Article Details

Description

This is a systematic review of the literature examining the feasibility of providing assessment, treatment, or consultative services via telepractice compared to in-person services for individuals with aphasia.

Questions/Aims Addressed

Question/aim not specifically stated

Population

Individuals with aphasia

Intervention/Assessment

Aphasia assessment, treatment or consultation delivered remotely compared to in-person service delivery

Number of Studies Included

10

Years Included

Up to 2012


Conclusions from This Systematic Review

What are Conclusions?

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Assessment

Four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia assessments delivered in-person and via telepractice and four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia treatments delivered in-person and via telepractice. An additional two studies examined the effectiveness of teleconferencing to conduct consultations or administer outcome questionnaires. All studies found no differences between service delivery models suggesting that telepractice is a viable service delivery option for individuals with aphasia. However, given the paucity of studies included, further research is needed.

Keywords: Format (e.g. Group/Telepractice), Aphasia

Treatment

Four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia assessments delivered in-person and via telepractice and four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia treatments delivered in-person and via telepractice. An additional two studies examined the effectiveness of teleconferencing to conduct consultations or administer outcome questionnaires. All studies found no differences between service delivery models suggesting that telepractice is a viable service delivery option for individuals with aphasia. However, given the paucity of studies included, further research is needed.

Keywords: Format (e.g. Group/Telepractice), Aphasia

Service Delivery

Four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia assessments delivered in-person and via telepractice and four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia treatments delivered in-person and via telepractice. An additional two studies examined the effectiveness of teleconferencing to conduct consultations or administer outcome questionnaires. All studies found no differences between service delivery models suggesting that telepractice is a viable service delivery option for individuals with aphasia. However, given the paucity of studies included, further research is needed.

Keywords: Format (e.g. Group/Telepractice), Aphasia

Go to Map

Assessment

Four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia assessments delivered in-person and via telepractice and four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia treatments delivered in-person and via telepractice. An additional two studies examined the effectiveness of teleconferencing to conduct consultations or administer outcome questionnaires. All studies found no differences between service delivery models suggesting that telepractice is a viable service delivery option for individuals with aphasia. However, given the paucity of studies included, further research is needed.

Keywords: Format (e.g. Group/Telepractice), Aphasia

Treatment

Four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia assessments delivered in-person and via telepractice and four studies compared the effectiveness of aphasia treatments delivered in-person and via telepractice. An additional two studies examined the effectiveness of teleconferencing to conduct consultations or administer outcome questionnaires. All studies found no differences between service delivery models suggesting that telepractice is a viable service delivery option for individuals with aphasia. However, given the paucity of studies included, further research is needed.

Keywords: Format (e.g. Group/Telepractice), Aphasia

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