Summary of the Systematic Review

Article Citation

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Dementia: Educating Caregivers on Alzheimer's Disease and Training Communication Strategies

Zientz, J., Rackley, A., et al. (2007).
Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 15(1), liii-lxiv.
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Sponsoring Body

Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences; American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Department of Veterans Affairs

Article Quality Ratings

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Indicators of Review Quality

  • Yes The review states a clearly focused question/aim.
  • Yes Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided.
  • Yes Search strategy described in sufficient detail for replication.
  • Yes Included studies are assessed for study quality.
  • Yes Quality assessments are reproducible.
  • No Characteristics of the included studies are provided.

Article Details

Description

This is a review of experimental and observational studies that investigated the effects of caregiver education and training on the communication functioning of individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This review is part of a series of reports from the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Science specific to the assessment and management of individuals with dementia.

Questions/Aims Addressed

"The goal of this article ... is to summarize the state of evidence regarding caregiver training in communication strategies to improve interactions with individuals who have [Alzheimer's disease]" (p. liv).

Population

Adults with Alzheimer's disease and caregivers

Intervention/Assessment

Caregiver education and training

Number of Studies Included

6

Years Included

1960-2002

Evidence Ratings for This Document

Classes of evidence are defined as follows: 
  • Class I: Evidence from one or more well-designed randomized controlled trial studies.
  • Class II: Evidence from one or more well designed observational studies (e.g. case-control studies, cohort studies).
  • Class III: Evidence from case series, case studies or expert opinion.

Conclusions from This Systematic Review

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Treatment

Preliminary evidence suggests that caregiver training may be beneficial to enhance communication skills. Caregiver training may contribute to improved conversation, maintenance of language ability and quality of life for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (Class I, II, and III Evidence). 

Keywords: Diagnosis, Alzheimer’s Disease, Cognitive-Communication, Quality of Life, Caregiver Partner Training, Education/Counseling

Notes on This Article

Associated Article

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Working with Individuals with Dementia: Montessori-Based Interventions
Read ASHA's Article Summary | Go to Article

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations: Caregiver-Administered Active Cognitive Stimulation for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease
Read ASHA's Article Summary | Go to Article

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Working with Individuals with Dementia: Spaced-Retrieval Training
Read ASHA's Article Summary | Go to Article

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Working with Individuals with Dementia: Simulated Presence Therapy
Read ASHA's Article Summary | Go to Article

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Working with Individuals with Dementia: Computer-Assisted Cognitive Interventions (CACIs)
Read ASHA's Article Summary | Go to Article

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Working with Individuals with Dementia: Group Reminiscence Therapy
Read ASHA's Article Summary | Go to Article

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