2012 Press Releases

8589976374ContentABC Sitcom Speechless Named 2017 Recipient of the Annie Glenn Award/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ABC-Sitcom-Speechless-Named-2017-Recipient-of-the-Annie-Glenn-Award/The ABC Television Network series "Speechless" will be honored with the Annie Glenn Award for 2017 by ASHA.ABC Sitcom "Speechless" Named 2017 Recipient of the Annie Glenn Award by the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationPrestigious Award Recognizes Those Making a Positive Impact on the Lives of People With Communication DisordersRockvilleMD2017-11-09The ABC Television Network series "Speechless" will be honored with the Annie Glenn Award for 2017 by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Named for Annie Glenn, advocate and wife of astronaut John Glenn, the award honors those who have made a positive impact on the lives of people with communication disorders. "Speechless" is produced for ABC by Twentieth Century Fox Television.Mrs. Glenn, who experienced a severe stutter well into her adult years, has worked tirelessly for roughly 40 years as a champion for people with speech, language, and hearing disorders."Speechless" is the trailblazing ABC family comedy that centers on a 16-year-old boy with cerebral palsy, and his dysfunctional, yet lovable, family. The character, JJ DiMeo, is nonverbal and uses an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device to communicate. The actor who portrays him, Micah Fowler, also has cerebral palsy.The show’s creator, Scott Silveri, grew up with a brother with cerebral palsy who was nonverbal. The show is one of very few in the history of television to feature a character with a disability in a lead role. Among them, "Speechless" is especially unique in that it is a comedy. Reflecting on the show’s impact, Mrs. Glenn noted, "It really is remarkable that a show like [Speechless] is on TV these days. Years ago, an individual with a disability would never have been a lead character in such a funny show. Think about how many people now understand that people who use different ways to communicate are the same as you and me. And that TV family is just as silly as your own family. I think that gives a lot of hope to families out there dealing with some struggles and trying to figure out their next steps. Nothing is bigger than the family working together.""We at 'Speechless' are honored and deeply gratified to be this year's recipient of ASHA's Annie Award," said "Speechless" creator/executive producer Scott Silveri. "'Speechless' is a show about communication: between parents and their kids, between brothers and sisters...but on a more literal level, between one non-verbal young man and the world around him as he strives to find what each of us wants—a way to be heard. Immersing ourselves as we have in the world of speech and alternative communication has been a revelation for our writers, cast, and crew—one that has changed every one of us. But we do our work in a world of make-believe. As such we are humbled to be recognized by ASHA, a body of pioneers and tireless advocates who offer real-world solutions. We celebrate ASHA for the work they do, and thank them for this generous recognition. We will continue to strive to tell stories that are worthy of this honor," Silveri continued. "We are thrilled to recognize the show 'Speechless' with our 2017 Annie Award," said Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2017 ASHA President. "As a prime-time comedy on a major television network, 'Speechless' has a tremendous platform to raise awareness and understanding of people who communicate in a manner that is different from the norm. We hope its success will encourage the inclusion of more characters and stories in the media and entertainment industries that showcase the unique experiences and capabilities of people with communication and related disorders."The award will be presented to "Speechless" actors Micah Fowler and Cedric Yarbrough at an evening ceremony on Friday, November 10, 2017, at the ASHA Annual Convention at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The presentation of this prestigious award is an annual and well-received highlight of the professional conference, which regularly draws approximately 15,000 attendees—largely audiologists and speech-language pathologists. First awarded in 1987, past recipients of the "Annie" include Vice President Joe Biden, James Earl Jones, Gabby Giffords and Mark Kelly, Julie Andrews, Jane Seymour, Bob and Lee Woodruff, Bill and Willie Geist, and "The King's Speech" screenwriter David Seidler.  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM11/9/2017 3:03:05 PM11/9/2017 11:42:44 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonABC Sitcom Speechless Named 2017 Recipient of the Annie Glenn Award8589942931A10330False011/9/2017 03:03:05 PM11/9/2017 11:42:44 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ABC-Sitcom-Speechless-Named-2017-Recipient-of-the-Annie-Glenn-Award/8589973244ContentAcademy of Nutrition and Dietetics, ASHA Support New Global Standardization of Diets for Swallowing Disorders/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Academy-of-Nutrition-and-Dietetics,-ASHA-Support-New-Global-Standardization-of-Diets-for-Swallowing-Disorders/The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ASHA support a new global initiative to standardize diets for the treatment of people with swallowing disorders.Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, ASHA Support New Global Standardization of Diets for Swallowing DisordersRockvilleMD2017-01-31The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) together announce their support of a new global initiative to standardize diets for the treatment of people who suffer from swallowing disorders.The International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative (IDDSI) created global standardized terminology and definitions for texture-modified foods and thickened liquids to improve the safety and care for individuals with dysphagia, a swallowing disorder, which affects an estimated 560 million people worldwide."The Academy, our members and multidisciplinary colleagues look forward to collaboratively working to implement this important new framework to help Americans suffering from swallowing disorders," said registered dietitian nutritionist and the Academy's 2016-2017 President Lucille Beseler, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, FAND. "The standardization framework represents a tremendous step forward in collaborating in the care of people with swallowing disorders," said 2017 ASHA President Gail J. Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP. "With ASHA members on the front lines of treating these patients every day, we support tools that help us improve quality of care."Dysphagia can occur at any time throughout a person’s life. The most common causes are related to underlying medical or physical conditions. In severe cases, this dysphagia can lead to life-threatening chest infection, pneumonia, malnutrition, or dehydration. One of the most common ways of managing dysphagia is the provision of texture-modified foods and thickened liquids. These modified foods and drinks are provided to help reduce the risk of choking or having material entering the lungs airway and may be commonly referred to as a dysphagia diet. The Academy's Evidence Based Practice Committee (EBPC) reviewed IDDSI's 2015 article, "The Influence of Food Texture and Liquid Consistency Modification on Swallowing Physiology and Function: A Systematic Review, Dysphagia," and determined the methodology is sound. Based on this and other reviews, Academy leaders in October 2016 voted to support the adoption of IDDSI.ASHA supported IDDSI's multidisciplinary effort to gather information from clinicians around the world that led to the IDDSI framework and methods for standardizing both food and drink, and its Board of Directors passed a resolution in 2016 to support the IDDSI Framework.IDDSI is leading the implementation of this program in 21 countries throughout the world. All registered dietitians are nutritionists—but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy's Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use "registered dietitian nutritionist" (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.The American Speech-Language Hearing Association is the national professional, scientific and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM2/1/2017 8:25:59 AM1/31/2017 11:25:28 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonAcademy of Nutrition and Dietetics, ASHA Support New Global Standardization of Diets for Swallowing Disorders8589942931A10330False02/1/2017 08:25:59 AM1/31/2017 11:25:28 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Academy-of-Nutrition-and-Dietetics,-ASHA-Support-New-Global-Standardization-of-Diets-for-Swallowing-Disorders/8589942598ContentAccrediting Body of Audiology Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Programs Earns Continued Recognition/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Accrediting-Body-of-Audiology-Speech-Language-Pathology-Graduate-Programs-Earns-Continued-Recognition/The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) recently received the maximum 10-year renewal of recognition from the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).Accrediting Body of Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Programs Earns Continued Recognition For High Standards RockvilleMD2014-04-07The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) recently received the maximum 10-year renewal of recognition from the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).CHEA sets standards for accreditors related to academic quality, accountability, and improvements in higher education.The renewal reaffirms that CAA, a semiautonomous body within the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), operates in ways that demonstrate compliance with CHEA's standards and accepted best practices within the accrediting community. It is the only accrediting body for programs in audiology and speech-language pathology that is recognized by both CHEA and the U.S. Secretary of Education.As of March 2014, 243 master's programs in speech-language pathology and 73 clinical doctoral programs in audiology are CAA-accredited. Another 16 new programs—15 in speech-language pathology and one in audiology—hold candidate (or pre-accreditation) status for accreditation."ASHA has been committed to quality graduate education in the professions for more than 50 years, dating back to when the first set of accreditation standards were developed in the early 1960s," ASHA 2014 President Elizabeth S. McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, says. "Through the CAA's work, we are helping academic programs ensure they graduate students who are fully prepared to provide effective professional services as audiologists and speech-language pathologists." "Just like our review of the academic programs, CHEA's recognition process provides CAA with an important opportunity for self-evaluation of our accreditation program and processes," CAA Chair Joan Besing, PhD, CCC-A, notes. "An important part of our self-study comes from peer review and dialogue with our stakeholders in the higher education community. Our accreditation program is strengthened by this rigorous review process and is valuable to us and the programs that we serve." About the Council on Academic AccreditationThe CAA formulates standards for the accreditation of graduate education programs that provide entry-level professional preparation in audiology and/or speech-language pathology; evaluates programs that voluntarily apply for accreditation; grants certificates and recognizes those programs deemed to have fulfilled requirements for accreditation; maintains a registry of holders of such certificates; and prepares and furnishes to appropriate persons and agencies lists of accredited programs. Although it is part of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the CAA operates autonomously when it carries out its accreditation tasks.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/4/2014 12:28:33 PM4/9/2014 10:23:10 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonAccrediting Body of Audiology Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Programs Earns Continued Recognition8589935226A10330False06/4/2014 12:28:33 PM4/9/2014 10:23:10 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Accrediting-Body-of-Audiology-Speech-Language-Pathology-Graduate-Programs-Earns-Continued-Recognition/8589976657ContentAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association Statement On Reports of Federal Word Ban/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/American-Speech-Language-Hearing-Association-Statement-On-Reports-of-Federal-Word-Ban/ ASHA is more committed than ever to fostering and preserving the goal of health care outcomes that are evidence-based, science-based, and equitable.American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Statement On Reports of Federal Word BanRockvilleMD2017-12-21Recent news reports have indicated that agencies within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services may have prohibited the inclusion of "evidence-based," "science-based," and "diversity," as well as other universally-accepted terms in their 2019 budgeting documents. While some federal officials have denied these stories, they are, nonetheless, very concerning.If true, the prohibitive action described by the reports would mark a serious step backward in the pursuit of providing health care that is based in scientific evidence, effective, and equitable. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association is more committed than ever to fostering and preserving the goal of health care outcomes that are evidence-based, science-based, and equitable, a commitment which includes achieving that critical aim by actively working with allied stakeholders who share in our concern.The American Speech-Language-Hearing-Association (ASHA) is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students.For further information contact pr@asha.org.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM12/22/2017 5:49:28 PM12/21/2017 3:30:07 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association Statement On Reports of Federal Word Ban8589942931A10330False012/22/2017 05:49:28 PM12/21/2017 03:30:07 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/American-Speech-Language-Hearing-Association-Statement-On-Reports-of-Federal-Word-Ban/8589975614ContentAOTA and ASHA Win Association Industry’s Highest Honor/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/AOTA-and-ASHA-Win-Association-Industry-s-Highest-Honor/The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) have together earned a 2017 ASAE Power of A Silver Award. AOTA and ASHA Win Association Industry's Highest HonorASAE’s Power of A Award recognizes innovative associations working to positively impact the worldRockvilleMD2017-07-28The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) have together earned a 2017 ASAE Power of A Silver Award.The association community's highest honor recognizes AOTA and ASHA's efforts to advocate with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) and federal agencies to make changes to the Affordable Care Act's summary of benefits and coverage (SBC) document. As a result of this advocacy, the revised SBC and related materials help increase consumers' health literacy of rehabilitative and habilitative services.Typically, AOTA and ASHA advocate directly with the federal government. In this case, the Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and Treasury deferred recommendations to the NAIC—leading AOTA and ASHA to establish relationships within the NAIC. The groups advocated successfully for:The SBC template to maintain separate and distinct rows for rehabilitation services and habilitation services, and that they should not be combined.Health plans to list any limitations to occupational, physical, and speech therapy; and if there is a quantifiable limit, to specify that information.The definition for "medically necessary" in the Uniform Glossary of Medical Terms to specifically mention habilitation."This award recognizes the ongoing collaborative commitment of AOTA and ASHA to improve consumer access to quality occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech, language, and hearing services," said Frederick P. Somers, Chief Executive Officer for AOTA. "This work positively impacts the community and the professions by increasing recognition of habilitation that was not routinely covered pre-ACA, elevating awareness of our professions' services, and enabling consumers to better evaluate, compare, and understand the covered services and cost-sharing of health insurance plans to improve their health policy." "Through AOTA and ASHA's cooperative work on this project, 180 million Americans will have access to clear information about the level and scope of coverage for habilitative and rehabilitative benefits under the different health insurance plans available to them," said Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE, Chief Executive Officer of ASHA. "This information will allow consumers to select their insurance coverage in an informed way—a big boost to transparency in the often-complex process of choosing a health plan. It also will allow those with existing health insurance to better understand their coverage for habilitative care. It is hard to overstate the importance of this project, given the potentially dramatic effects that coverage for habilitative services can have on the health and lives of people who require them." ASAE offered the association's congratulations on a job well-done. "Congratulations to AOTA and ASHA for their efforts to enrich and strengthen lives," said Sharon J. Swan, FASAE, CAE, Chief Executive Officer of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Chair of the Power of A Awards Judging Committee. "Their initiative exemplifies how we work best when we work together and how associations have a positive influence on our everyday lives in every way." ASAE's Power of A (association) Awards, the industry's highest honor, recognize the association community's valuable contributions on the local, national, and global levels. The Power of A Awards reward the outstanding accomplishments of associations and industry professionals who work tirelessly to strengthen lives, the workforce, our systems and structures, the economy, and the world. To learn more about the award, visit www.ThePowerofA.org/awards or follow #PWRA on Twitter.Founded in 1917, AOTA represents the professional interests and concerns of more than 213,000 occupational therapists, assistants, and students nationwide. The Association educates the public and advances the profession of occupational therapy by providing resources, setting standards including accreditations, and serving as an advocate to improve health care. Based in Bethesda, Md., AOTA's major programs and activities are directed toward promoting the professional development of its members and assuring consumer access to quality services so patients can maximize their individual potential. For more information, visit www.aota.org.ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.orgTo speak with a representative from AOTA, contact Manager of Media & Public Relations Katie Riley at 301-652-6611 x2963 or kriley@aota.org. To speak with a representative from ASHA, contact Public Relations Manager Francine Pierson at 301-296-8715 or FPierson@asha.org. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM7/31/2017 3:59:49 PM7/28/2017 2:53:24 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonAOTA and ASHA Win Association Industry’s Highest Honor8589942931A10330False07/31/2017 03:59:49 PM7/28/2017 02:53:24 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/AOTA-and-ASHA-Win-Association-Industry-s-Highest-Honor/8589971457ContentAphasia on the Campaign Trail/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Aphasia-on-the-Campaign-Trail/With aphasia, a communication disorder that results from damage to the language areas of the brain, in the news, it is important to understand the facts about this diagnosis.Aphasia on the Campaign TrailRockvilleMD2016-08-19With aphasia, a communication disorder that results from damage to the language areas of the brain, in the news, it is important to understand the facts about this diagnosis: Aphasia (also referred to as "dysphasia") is a complex disorder that can range in severity and present itself in various ways. Some people with aphasia may have difficulty with spoken language (e.g., coming up with words or substituting intended word with a related word), but have no problem with understanding others. Some may have no obvious problems expressing themselves, but may not understand others appropriately. Approximately one million individuals suffer from aphasia in the United States. Aphasia is caused by a neurologic event, most commonly a stroke. However, any disease or damage to the parts of the brain that control language can cause aphasia. Aphasia may cause difficulties in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, but does not affect intelligence. Aphasia is diagnosed and treated by speech-language pathologists, professionals who undergo significant training and possess the necessary expertise to identify this disorder appropriately, often when referred by a physician who is treating the neurologic event--such as a neurologist. It cannot be diagnosed by a lay person and/or from afar. Diagnosing aphasia requires a thorough assessment of a person's: Auditory Comprehension: understanding spoken words, questions, directions, and complex informationVerbal Expression: naming objects, describing pictures, expressing thoughts and feelings, and having conversationsReading and Writing: understanding or producing letters, words, sentences, and paragraphsFunctional Communication: appropriately using gestures, drawing, pointing, or other supportive means of communicationMore information is available from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM10/5/2016 11:20:34 AM8/19/2016 2:36:36 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherAphasia on the Campaign Trail8589942122A10330False010/5/2016 11:20:34 AM8/19/2016 02:36:36 PMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Aphasia-on-the-Campaign-Trail/8589965591ContentASHA 2015 Convention Session Highlights/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-2015-Convention-Session-Highlights/Highlights of the upcoming 2015 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association are featured.Earlier Autism Identification, New Approaches to Concussion Care, and Voice Modification Services for Transgender Individuals Among Presentations Slated for Upcoming ASHA ConventionAnnie Glenn To Be Honored: Spouse of Legendary Astronaut an Inspiration to Millions With Communication Disorders RockvilleMD2015-11-09"Changing Minds, Changing Lives. Leading the Way," the 2015 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, will be held at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, November 12–14, 2015.The event will feature thousands of sessions on topics related to communication disorders, which are affecting an increasing number of Americans.Against a backdrop of rising incidence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attendees will have the opportunity to hear from experts whose research into early risk markers in infants as young as 6 months may lead to speedier diagnoses in the future—an important focus, given the proven impact of early intervention on developmental outcomes. Another presenter will contend that concussion care is riddled with myths and needs to change—a serious assertion, considering half a million children are being treated in the emergency room for traumatic brain injury (TBI), including concussion, every year. Meanwhile, leading experts will present new guidelines for an emerging practice area—voice modification services for transgender individuals. Also, Annie Glenn, wife of astronaut and former Sen. John Glenn, will be honored. She has spent much of her life overcoming a stutter and advocating tirelessly on behalf of millions of Americans with various types of communication disorders who face some of the same challenges that she did.Session highlights for the ASHA 2015 Convention include the following:At-Risk ASD Infants: How Early Can We Identify Them & How May Caregivers React?— Early intervention services for young children with ASD can significantly improve developmental outcomes. One study showed that more than 50% of caregivers of children with ASD reported having concerns by 18 months, and recent research documented that some symptoms are present at 12 months in at least a substantial proportion of infants. However, many professionals do not feel comfortable making diagnoses this early—potentially impeding optimal outcomes. In this session, three leading experts who are active in early intervention will discuss early risk markers as well as caregiver reactions to professionals' early concerns. Panel members will present their research on early risk markers via sibling studies, a screening measure developed for one-year old children from the broader population, and a screening measure developed for 6- to 24-month-olds in the general population.Predictors of Parent Responsiveness to One-Year Olds at Risk for Autism—Past research has shown that so-called parent responsiveness—a quick and meaningful response to a child, based on the child's focus of attention—is critical to a child's development in areas including cognition, communication, and social skills. Based on its importance, many early autism interventions teach parents to be highly responsive. This study, which looked at 97 parent–infant pairs, is the first to examine how the sensory characteristics of infants at-risk for autism could influence parent responsiveness. Children were flagged as being at risk at 12 months, and were assessed at 13½ months of age. The researchers found that when infants had poor communication and under-reactivity to sensory stimuli, parents talked less (e.g., fewer comments about play) and used more play actions (e.g., helping the child with a toy). The findings could influence future strategies used in early autism intervention.Concussion Reconsidered in Children, Adolescents & Young Adults: New Science, New Roles for SLPs—Have health care providers been treating concussion in children all wrong? With almost half a million children being treated in the emergency room for TBI, including concussion, each year, this is a serious public health issue. Many of the key "truths" that have guided concussion treatment for years—including the ideas of brain rest and secondary impact syndrome—are now considered myths. But many providers, parents, and the public at large aren't aware of this new thinking. The speakers in this session will explore how treatment is changing; why prolonged rest and other treatment approaches were actually making individuals worse; why certain populations, including girls and individuals with histories of previous TBI, learning disabilities, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), are at greater risk for concussion; and more.Supporting the Modification of Voice & Resonance With Speakers Who Are Transgender—With voice a key part of an individual's gender identity, voice modification services for transgender individuals are gaining increased recognition. Although it has been around for more than 35 years, the World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH) first provided standards on voice and communication in 2011. This month, it will publish updated and more far-reaching guidelines in the International Journal of Transgenderism. Two leading experts in the field will present the new guidelines and provide details on evidence-based practice in voice modification for people in the transgender community. Their session will focus specifically on voice and resonance—two aspects of this treatment that require complex understanding of human physiology. Hearing Loss & Healthy Aging – A Public Health Perspective—Increasingly, research is demonstrating the impact of hearing loss on overall physical and mental health. Recent epidemiologic research by Dr. Frank Lin of Johns Hopkins University has shown that hearing loss is independently associated with accelerated cognitive decline and incident dementia. In this session, Lin will present his research and will discuss planned studies to investigate the impact of hearing rehabilitative interventions on reducing cognitive decline and future trends in addressing hearing loss as a public health problem.The Secret Language of Twins: Implications for Language Development—The idea that twins engage in their own special form of communication is backed by anecdotal and scientific evidence. Previous studies have looked at a potential relationship between this "twin talk" and delayed language development. However, no study has compared language development of fraternal and identical twins. This study advances knowledge in this area in numerous ways, finding that more twins engage in twin talk than previously reported, that same-gender twins use twin talk more frequently, and that identical twins use twin talk for a longer period than fraternal twins. It also points to a particular vulnerability in the area of speech sound development. The findings identify the need for parents of twins to be especially attentive to communication milestones and early identification opportunities, especially as multiple births are increasingly common.Note to media: If you are interested in attending the ASHA Convention or arranging an interview, please contact Francine Pierson at fpierson@asha.org.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM11/9/2015 12:39:40 PM11/9/2015 12:39:38 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA 2015 Convention Session Highlights8589935339A10330False011/9/2015 12:39:40 PM11/9/2015 12:39:38 PMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-2015-Convention-Session-Highlights/8589972985ContentASHA 2017 President Gail Richard Begins Term/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-2017-President-Gail-Richard-Begins-Term/ASHA's new president Gail Richard begins 2017 term.ASHA 2017 President Gail Richard Begins TermRockvilleMD2017-01-03Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, took office as the 2017 president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) on January 1. In this role, Richard works to advance the objectives of ASHA and its 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Richard has been on the faculty at Eastern Illinois University (EIU) in communication disorders and sciences for 35 years, including 14 years as department chair. She retired from the teaching faculty in May 2014 to serve as director of a new initiative—the Autism Center on the EIU campus. In her current work with the Autism Center, she conducts evaluations, consultations, and educational workshops.  "I am honored, humbled, and excited to serve ASHA members as their president in 2017," said Richard. "It is a wonderful opportunity to encourage greater awareness of the impact communication disorders have on the lives of those served by ASHA members as well as foster progress in cross-disciplinary collaboration." Richard is a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist with expertise in childhood language disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, auditory/language processing disorders, selective mutism, executive functions, and language learning disorders. She also has authored numerous clinical and scholarly publications, including the Language Processing Test 3 and the Differential Screening Test for Processing. Her professional service includes 17 years on the ASHA Legislative Council, where she held the leadership roles of speaker of the Council, Speech-Language Hearing Assembly coordinator, and floor manager. Richard chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on the Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Identifying and Treating Children With Auditory/Linguistic Processing Disorders and was named an ASHA Fellow in 2000. From 2012 to 2014, she served as vice president for speech-language-pathology practice on the ASHA Board of Directors. In this role, Richard had oversight for several critical committees, including Reframing the Professions of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, updating the Scope of Practice for Speech-Language Pathology and the Speech-Language Pathology Assistant Scope of Practice, and establishing an advisory board for school issues. Prior to joining EIU's faculty, Richard provided diagnostic and therapeutic services in the Iowa public schools. She also served in several leadership roles for the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ISHA), including president, and has received Fellow and Honors distinctions from ISHA. At the university, Richard served as the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) faculty athletics representative for 17 years, including a term on the Division I NCAA Management Council.   About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/3/2017 11:23:08 AM1/3/2017 10:41:15 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA 2017 President Gail Richard Begins Term8589942931A10330False01/3/2017 11:23:08 AM1/3/2017 10:41:15 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-2017-President-Gail-Richard-Begins-Term/8589944475ContentASHA and Pan American Health Organizations Plan of Action/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-and-Pan-American-Health-Organizations-Plan-of-Action/ASHA was recognized as a non-governmental organization (NGO) by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and submitted comments for the record about PAHO's Plan of Action on Disabilities and Rehabilitation.ASHA Expresses Support For Pan American Health Organization's Plan of Action on Disabilities and Rehabilitation Comment Is An Opening Step As An Officially Recognized NGORockvilleMD2014-10-02In its first official act after being recognized as a non-governmental organization (NGO) by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Regional Office for the Americas of the World Health Organization (WHO), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) submitted comments for the record about PAHO's Plan of Action on Disabilities and Rehabilitation.The occasion was the 53rd Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization, 66th Session of the Regional Committee of the World Health Organization for the Americas which is being held this week in Washington, DC.PAHO's plan features a "multi-sectoral approach" that is inclusive of health ministers, academic institutions, non-governmental organizations, and other related entities or services. It allows key players in the international health community to join forces to tackle issues of disability and rehabilitation. As a result, ASHA is able to contribute its technical expertise in the field of communication health and create strategic partnerships with PAHO and local institutions in the countries to improve the speech, language, and hearing outcomes in the Americas.ASHA CEO Arlene Pietranton, PhD, CAE, attended the PAHO Director Council meeting and submitted ASHA's comments. They expressed ASHA's appreciation for having the opportunity to comment and its strong interest in further collaboration."We look forward to continuing to work with PAHO's Disability and Rehabilitation unit and improving the quality of life and health outcomes and, specifically, speech-language-hearing related health outcomes that are among the most basic and essential of human functions for people with disabilities in the Americas Region." PAHO conferred official NGO status on ASHA in June; the designation allows the Association to participate in PAHO meetings and contribute to discussions involving communication health. ASHA's work with PAHO developing sustainable and culturally relevant educational programs for speech-language pathology and audiology in three Latin American countries—El Salvador, Guyana, and Honduras—helped qualify it for NGO status. "We extend our sincere gratitude to PAHO for recognizing the strength of our commitment to improving communication health in other countries, now and in the future," said ASHA President Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP. "We look forward to our continued partnership with PAHO and other global health organizations to help address communication issues at the international level."About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/14/2015 2:01:16 PM10/2/2014 10:32:28 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA and Pan American Health Organizations Plan of Action8589935226A10330False01/14/2015 02:01:16 PM10/2/2014 10:32:28 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-and-Pan-American-Health-Organizations-Plan-of-Action/8589976100ContentASHA and Read Aloud 15 MINUTES Announce New Go-To Resource for Parents of Young Children/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-and-Read-Aloud-15-MINUTES-Announce-New-Go-To-Resource-for-Parents-of-Young-Children/Communicating With Baby: Tips and Milestones From Birth to Age 5, a series of seven handouts that detail communication skills that parents should expect to see in their child by age and tips for how to support children’s development, has been released by ASHA and Read Aloud 15 MINUTES.ASHA and Read Aloud 15 MINUTES Announce New Go-To Resource for Parents of Young ChildrenFree Toolkit Offers Essential Information on Communication Development and Tips to Help Build Babies’ Brains Through Daily ReadingRockvilleMD2017-10-02Communicating With Baby: Tips and Milestones From Birth to Age 5, a series of seven handouts that detail communication skills that parents should expect to see in their child by age and tips for how to support children’s development, has been released today by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and Read Aloud 15 MINUTES.Available in English and Spanish, the handouts cover these age ranges:Birth–3 months [PDF]4–6 months [PDF]7–12 months [PDF]1–2 years [PDF]2–3 years [PDF]3–4 years [PDF]4–5 years [PDF]“From Day 1, babies are learning from the world around them—primarily through listening to their parents talk, read, sing, and otherwise interact with them,” said Bob Robbins, Executive Director, Read Aloud 15 MINUTES. “With this online toolkit, we want to provide parents with advice and easy activities that help them support their babies’ growth during their most rapid period of brain development—their first few years of life. The most powerful things a parent can do to set a child up for success require no money—only time and attention. We want parents to understand how daily reading and verbal exchange start the lifetime path to learning and academic success.”“This toolkit offers parents vital information on what they should expect their children to be able to do by age in the areas of talking, hearing, and understanding,” said Gail J. Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2017 ASHA President. “Some parents may question whether their child’s communication development is on track. The detailed lists of milestones included here can help either set parents’ minds at ease or empower them to seek an evaluation if they see that their child is lagging behind on certain skills. Any communication delay or disorder is most effectively treated when addressed early, and some can be prevented altogether. This information gives parents the tools they need to monitor their child’s communication development with confidence.”Certified audiologists and speech-language pathologists, pediatricians, early childhood educators, librarians, and any other professionals who interact with young children are also welcome to use this free resource—either electronically or in print. Anyone with concerns about a child’s communication abilities should seek an evaluation from a certified audiologist or speech-language pathologist. More information, and a searchable database of these professionals, is available at http://IdentifytheSigns.org. More information about the benefits of reading aloud to children daily can be found at www.readaloud.org.  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.orgAbout Read AloudRead Aloud 15 MINUTES is a non-profit organization that is working to make reading aloud every day for at least 15 minutes the new standard in child care. When every child is read aloud to for 15 minutes every day from birth, more children will be ready to learn when they enter kindergarten; more children will have the literacy skills needed to succeed in school; and more children will be prepared for a productive and meaningful life after school. For more information, visit: www.readaloud.org. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM10/5/2017 3:53:19 PM10/2/2017 9:53:36 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA and Read Aloud 15 MINUTES Announce New Go-To Resource for Parents of Young Children8589942931A10330False010/5/2017 03:53:19 PM10/2/2017 09:53:36 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-and-Read-Aloud-15-MINUTES-Announce-New-Go-To-Resource-for-Parents-of-Young-Children/8589944103ContentASHA Announces 2014 Media Award Winners/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Announces-2014-Media-Award-Winners/ASHA has named NBC's TODAY Show, USA Today, Allied Health Media, and NPR as the winners of its 2014 media awards.ASHA Announces 2014 Media Award WinnersNBC’s TODAY Show, USA Today, Allied Health Media, NPR Honored; Ann W. Kummer, Patti Martin, Yadira Medina-Torres, and Sonja Pruitt-Lord Named 2014 Media ChampionsRockvilleMD2014-08-04In recognition of news coverage that helped promote public awareness of communication disorders, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has named NBC's TODAY Show, USA Today, Allied Health Media, and NPR as the winners of its 2014 media awards.In addition, ASHA is honoring members Ann W. Kummer, PhD, CCC-SLP; Patti Martin, PhD, CCC-A; Yadira Medina-Torres, MS, CCC-SLP; and Sonja Pruitt-Lord, PhD, CCC-SLP as its 2014 Media Champions for their grassroots media outreach.The awards will be presented this November at the ASHA Annual Convention in Orlando, Florida."These awards acknowledge and honor reporting and messaging about the millions who live with communication disorders and the professionals whose work contributes enormously to improving their quality of life," said ASHA 2014 President Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP."What's more, our media champions have given generously of their time and expertise as they have worked effectively with media to give the public important information and insights about the nature, significance, and treatment of communication disorders."NBC's TODAY Show won for its May 2014 coverage on advances in hearing aid technology that featured an interview with ASHA Chief Staff Officer for Audiology Neil DiSarno, PhD, CCC-A. The national morning show segment reached an audience of more than four million. TODAY showcased some of the latest hearing aid technology, emphasizing the importance of seeing an audiologist as a first step toward treating hearing problems and gave viewers other positive and practical advice.USA Today won for its important follow-up coverage of a study in Pediatrics on stuttering in preschoolers. Unfortunately, initial media coverage propagated a message that a "wait and see" approach is appropriate for children in this age group, as the study indicated there is little evidence stuttering harms preschoolers' social and emotional development and stated that best practice is waiting at least 12 months to seek treatment. However, USA Today's follow-up piece expressed the professional opinion of many U.S. speech-language pathologists that such an approach is ill-advised, particularly in children at higher risk for continued stuttering. ASHA members Tommie Robinson, Jr., PhD, CCC-SLP and Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP were quoted and the Identify the Signs campaign was highlighted as a resource for parents.Allied Health Media, which runs AudiologyOnline and SpeechPathology.com, won for its partnership with and consistent promotion and coverage of the Identify the Signs campaign. This included promotion of a video with ASHA 2013 President Patricia A. Prelock, PhD, CCC-SLP; a feature article with ASHA Director of Public Relations Joseph Cerquone about the development, implementation, and impact of the campaign; letters from the editor that included campaign information; and social media promotion. Allied Health Media has also signed on as a partner of the International Communication Project 2014, a collaborative undertaking of which ASHA is a founding member.NPR won for its national piece on voice banking, an emerging opportunity for patients to be able to utilize their own voice long after they lose the ability to speak. The story featured a man preparing to lose his speech because of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. After this coverage originated with NPR station KPLU-FM Seattle, it was picked up by NPR stations nationwide.Media Champion Ann Kummer is being honored for her long-time volunteer service as a media source. Most recently, she served as a local spokesperson for the Identify the Signs campaign to help raise awareness of the early warning signs of communication disorders. Her efforts included television interviews with WXIX (FOX affiliate) and WLWT (NBC affiliate) in Cincinnati, Ohio.Patti Martin was named a Media Champion for her varied contributions to raising public awareness during the year, including her work as a subject matter expert in a story about infant sleep sound machines and potential hearing damage. She was also highly involved in the Identify the Signs campaign through her participation in a podcast on newborn hearing screening and a live Google Hangout event. Both occurred during the most recent Better Hearing and Speech Month. ASHA named Yadira Medina-Torres a 2014 Media Champion for her work to ensure the early detection message reached non-English-speaking communities by serving as the Spanish-language spokesperson for the Identify the Signs radio media tour in late 2013.Media Champion Sonja Pruitt-Lord served as an Identify the Signs spokesperson for local public radio and TV interviews for KPBS (PBS affiliate) in San Diego, California. In doing so, she helped raise awareness among parents of the importance of early detection and intervention of communication disorders.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/22/2015 1:00:28 PM8/4/2014 10:58:54 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Announces 2014 Media Award Winners8589935226A10330False05/22/2015 01:00:28 PM8/4/2014 10:58:54 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Announces-2014-Media-Award-Winners/8589946998ContentASHA Announces 2015 Media Award Winners/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Announces-2015-Media-Award-Winners/In recognition of media coverage that helped promote public awareness and understanding of communication disorders and the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has named the following outlets the winners of its 2015 media awards.ASHA Announces 2015 Media Award WinnersMajor Media Outlets Honored; ASHA Members Named 2015 Media Outreach ChampionsRockvilleMD2015-08-20In recognition of media coverage that helped promote public awareness and understanding of communication disorders and the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has named the following outlets the winners of its 2015 media awards:WDCA (MyNetworkTV) in Washington, DCKMEX (Univision affiliate) in Los AngelesWNCI-FM radio in ColumbusKZSF-AM radio in San JoseMinneapolis Star TribunePediatric NewsPhilly.com, Healthy Kids blogU.S. News & World ReportUSA TodayIn addition, these ASHA members have been named Media Outreach Champions: Nancy Alarcon, MS, CCC-SLP; Lauren Barnett, MA, CCC-SLP; Joseph Donaher, PhD, CCC-SLP; and Rich Tyler, PhD, CCC-A.The awards will be presented at the ASHA Annual Convention in Denver this November."We are very pleased to honor this year's winning media outlets, fully recognizing the important role the media plays as a mechanism for raising public awareness about communication disorders and the treatment options available through the work of our member audiologists and speech-language pathologists," said ASHA 2015 President Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP."We also salute our Media Outreach Champions, who have worked diligently with the media, offering their valuable time and expertise to educate the public and share insights about the nature, impact, and treatment of communication disorders."WDCA and KMEX won for their leadership in broadcast coverage of the Identify the Signs campaign's public service announcements (PSAs) to both English- and Spanish-speaking audiences. WDCA aired the PSA 352 times, reaching an estimated 25 million viewers. KMEX shared the PSA 25 times, reaching 6 million.WNCI-FM and KZSF-AM also won for their broadcast coverage of Identify the Signs PSAs to both English- and Spanish-speaking audiences. WNCI-FM aired the PSA 360 times, reaching more than 6 million listeners, and KZSF-AM aired the PSA 100 times, reaching nearly 6.5 million.USA Today won for publishing an editorial by ASHA President Page that raised the issue of the potential impact of technology misuse on children's communication development. This piece garnered national coverage, was shared on Facebook more than 26,000 times, and became the most popular post in ASHA's social media history up to that point. In addition, USA Today was recognized for its feature story on the World Health Organization's Make Listening Safe campaign that seeks to educate the public on the dangers of unsafe listening habits. The article quoted Neil DiSarno, PhD, CCC-A, ASHA's chief staff officer for audiology, and promoted the Listen To Your Buds campaign.Minneapolis Star Tribune was awarded for its coverage of the growing practice of and need for voice modification services for transgender individuals.Pediatric News was awarded for its publication of two editorials by ASHA President Page discussing the issue of noise-induced hearing loss and the recent ASHA polling results released during Better Hearing & Speech Month that asked parents about their children's technology usage.Philly.com's Healthy Kids blog won for serving as a forum for pieces on key communication health issues for children. In June, Healthy Kids featured the recent ASHA poll results and offered advice for managing tech time in favor of traditional communication from ASHA President Page. The blog also featured past stories on topics such as the importance of safe listening practices during the holiday season, when children often receive tech-related gifts.U.S. News & World Report received its award for its high-quality coverage of multiple communication-related health issues, including dysphagia and hearing loss.Nancy Alarcon is the director of the Speech & Hearing Clinic in Seattle and senior lecturer at the University of Washington. She was named a Media Outreach Champion for her contributions in raising public awareness in Seattle around the issue of excessive stadium noise. She was featured in NPR's national health blog Shots and has served as a media resource with local Seattle television and radio outlets.Lauren Barnett is with Barnett Therapy Services in Orlando. She is being honored for serving as a local subject matter expert for ASHA's Identify the Signs campaign, raising awareness of the early warning signs of communication disorders. Her efforts included television interviews with WESH (NBC affiliate in Orlando) and WMEL-AM radio in Orlando. Lauren used her I Heart Speech blog to champion the Identify the Signs campaign.Joseph Donaher is academic and research program director at the Center for Childhood Communication, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Joseph is being honored as a Media Outreach Champion for serving as a media resource for multiple stories about stuttering.Rich Tyler is professor of otolaryngology at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. He is being honored for his recent editorial in the Des Moines Register that warned of the potential risks from misuse of personal audio devices. Rich has also served as a media resource on many different stories over the past year on tinnitus and other hearing issues.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM8/20/2015 6:22:38 PM8/20/2015 7:19:07 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Announces 2015 Media Award Winners8589935339A10330False08/20/2015 06:22:38 PM8/20/2015 07:19:07 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Announces-2015-Media-Award-Winners/8589974118ContentASHA Announces Corporate Partnership With Northern Speech Services/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Announces-Corporate-Partnership-With-Northern-Speech-Services/Northern Speech Services has become an ASHA Corporate Partner.  ASHA Announces Corporate Partnership With Northern Speech ServicesRockvilleMD2017-04-04The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) announced today that Michigan-based Northern Speech Services (NSS), a provider of therapy materials and continuing education opportunities for speech-language pathologists, has become an ASHA Corporate Partner.   "ASHA is pleased to welcome NSS to our corporate partner program," ASHA President Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, said. "Corporate partnership represents an important source of support for ASHA members and the communication professions. As a part of our corporate partner program, NSS will be reaching out to ASHA members though channels including The ASHA Leader and the ASHA website to provide helpful resources and share information about NSS products and services."  "Our company is pleased and proud to have joined the ranks of ASHA corporate partners," according to Thomas Slominski, MA, CCC-SLP, President, CEO, and Founder of NSS, which was established in 1972. "We look forward to working with ASHA to provide its members with educational resources that inform and enhance the critical work they do every day." About Northern Speech Services (NSS)Meeting the diverse needs of speech-language pathologists and students, Northern Speech Services offers clinically relevant, evidence-based online CEUs and live workshops. NSS also provides cutting-edge therapy materials that are comprehensive and innovative. NSS is in the business of getting people where they want to go—whether it be to gain knowledge, practical applications, high-quality materials to assess/treat their clients, or all of the above. With a passion for high standards, NSS looks forward to providing service with excellence and enthusiasm. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org View all ASHA press releases at www.asha.org/about/news.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM4/4/2017 6:42:28 PM4/4/2017 6:42:27 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Announces Corporate Partnership With Northern Speech Services8589942931A10330False04/4/2017 06:42:28 PM4/4/2017 06:42:27 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Announces-Corporate-Partnership-With-Northern-Speech-Services/8589944738ContentASHA Annual Convention Sessions/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Annual-Convention-Sessions/ASHA Annual Convention features multiple sessions of interest with subjects such as the impact of movie theater noise and bullying of children who stutter.New Scientific Findings, Clinical Advances for Speech and Hearing Disorders to Be Presented at ASHA Annual ConventionMovie Theater Noise, Bullying of Children Who Stutter Among SessionsRockvilleMD2014-11-17With an increasing number of Americans experiencing communication disorders, new research and exciting advances for treating these more than 40 million individuals will be reported at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA) 2014 Convention in Orlando, Florida, November 20–22.The premier event for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists, the 2014 ASHA Convention theme is "Science. Learning. Practice. Generations of Discovery." In addition to the more than 2,400 sessions over its 3 days of core programming, the Convention will host its 24th annual Research Symposium, which brings together clinicians and researchers to discuss current research that has significant implications for the study of communication disorders. This year's focus is "Primary Language Impairment in Children With Concomitant Health Conditions or Nonmainstream Language Backgrounds," a timely topic given the increasingly diverse U.S. population as well as the growing complexity of diagnosing and treating children who present with multiple health or developmental disorders. Topics will include language impairment in the ADHD context, childhood language development after early cochlear implantation, and development and mechanisms of language impairment in autism spectrum disorder—parallels with other language disorders.The ASHA Convention will also host TV journalists Bill and Willie Geist, who will receive the 2014 Annie Glenn Award. ASHA awards the "Annie" to a person or people who, like Annie Glenn herself, build awareness about communication disorders. In 2012, longtime CBS News correspondent Bill Geist announced that he was suffering from Parkinson's, a disorder that—among other effects—can impact speech, voice quality, and swallowing. Bill and Willie Geist recently penned the book "Good Talk, Dad," a celebration of communication in which they have (often humorous) talks about life that they didn't have during Willie's childhood. Annie Glenn and her husband, former Sen. John Glenn, will present the award to the Geists. Among the 2014 Convention sessions are:Noise Exposure From Movie Theaters: Is There a Potential for Hearing Loss? (November 20, 11 a.m. ET)—Noise-induced hearing loss starts as a temporary shift in hearing with recovery when away from noise. Over time, recovery is less likely to occur, resulting in permanent loss of hearing. The sound level OSHA (the Occupational Safety and Health Administration) deems as a causative factor over an 8-hour time period is 90 dBA or a 100% dose. Despite the fact that 90% of the people polled for the study thought the noise levels in the theater were too high, the maximum dose recorded by any movie viewed for this research was little over 7%. The author concluded that it is highly unlikely that movie viewing alone could lead to a temporary shift in hearing. According to the author, few studies—two of which were published—have looked at the noise level in movie theaters to see if it was damaging viewers' hearing. The author plans to publish findings to contribute to the conversation on this subject matter. Assessing Bullying in Children Who Stutter (November 20, 3 p.m. ET)—Children who stutter were asked about their experiences with various kinds of bullying and the situations in which they occur. Overall, physical bullying was the least common type to occur. Though the number of reported bullying occurrences was low, the reported impact bullying had on the victims was high, preventing them from participating in certain activities. Bullying is most likely to occur at lunch, on the bus, or at recess—situations that are difficult to monitor. Most children reported that they would like to know how to stop bullying or what to say or do in response to bullying. Few studies have reported on the situations in which bullying occurs, but they have not focused on the impact bullying has on participation levels of children who stutter and the eagerness of children who stutter to know how to respond to and/or stop bullying. The author stated that the findings showcase the need for bullying prevention/intervention to be incorporated in treatment plans for children who stutter, educating children on how to address it, and teaching school personnel when to intervene if they witness bullying. Effects of Late Diagnosis of Autism in the African American Community? (November 20, 3p.m. ET)—Late diagnosis of autism may negatively impact communication outcomes for the African American child, resulting in longer, more intensive and expensive treatment. In addition, African American children with autism may receive inappropriate treatment due to initial misdiagnosis. This conclusion was reached based on findings in a collection of published research by speech-language pathologists. There is not a significant amount of published research on this topic. According to the author, ongoing research on African American children with autism is needed to enable a greater understanding of autism in the Africa American community and help reduce late diagnosis of autism in African American children. The Impact of Technology on Play Behaviors in Early Childhood (November 21, 9:30 a.m. ET)—Play is a critical early cognitive skill that contributes to a child's social and emotional development. As use of tablets and other smart technology skyrockets in young children, the impact of technology on development is still emerging. This research compared social interactions and language skills of children ages 18–36 months from "high technology" and "low technology" use households as they played with both real and digital objects. Few studies have looked at children this young, despite the fact that this age range represents a critical time for social and language development. While some differences were present, the author found all children in the study were socially interactive—even the "infant techies." The author noted that, although more studies are necessary, the findings show that parents can make smart technology a part of—but not the major part of—a young child's life. Note to media: If you are interested in attending the ASHA Convention or arranging an interview with any presenters, please contact Joseph Cerquone at jcerquone@asha.org. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/11/17/2014 7:00:00 AM11/17/2014 7:00:05 AM11/13/2014 8:45:36 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Annual Convention Sessions11/17/2014 07:00:00 AM8589935226A10330False011/17/2014 07:00:05 AM11/13/2014 08:45:36 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Annual-Convention-Sessions/8589976104ContentASHA Applauds House of Representatives on Reauthorization of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Act/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Applauds-House-of-Representatives-on-Reauthorization-of-Early-Hearing-Detection-and-Intervention-Act/ASHA commends the U.S. House of Representatives on today’s vote to reauthorize the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Act.ASHA Applauds House of Representatives on Reauthorization of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention ActLegislation Ensures Continued Funding for Identifying and Treating Newborns With Hearing LossRockvilleMD2017-10-03The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) commends the U.S. House of Representatives on today’s vote to reauthorize the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Act. This legislation will ensure continued federal funding for newborn hearing screening and intervention programs for the next 5 years.The U.S. Senate passed the legislation on September 6, 2017. Once it is signed by the President, it will become law.“The reauthorization of this legislation will continue the critical progress we have made since newborn hearing screening legislation was first passed nearly 20 years ago,” said ASHA 2017 President Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP. “This funding will help ensure that state Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs remain fully operational and successful, and that they properly link screening programs with diagnosis and early intervention.” “We thank the members of the House for allowing this public health success to continue and grow.” Getting EHDI legislation reauthorized had been one of ASHA’s public policy goals, and the organization worked nonstop to help make it happen. Approximately 2 to 3 in every 1,000 children in the United States are born with hearing loss, making it one of the most common birth defects in America. Late identification of hearing loss or lack of early intervention services can negatively impact children’s speech and language development, academic achievement and social–emotional development. The most critical time for stimulating the hearing centers in the brain is during the first few months of life, underscoring the importance of early detection and intervention.EHDI programs are designed to preclude the problems that can come when steps to identify hearing occur too late. Under this program, newborns are screened for hearing loss prior to their hospital discharge. Those who do not pass receive a diagnostic evaluation before 3 months of age and, when necessary, are enrolled in early intervention programs by 6 months of age.Until the 1990s, children born with permanent hearing loss typically would not have been identified and diagnosed until 2½ to 3 years of age. In 2014, data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that over 97% of newborns in the United States were screened for hearing loss. Between 2005 and 2014, over 45,000 deaf and hard-of-hearing infants born in the United States were identified early.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM10/5/2017 7:16:51 AM10/3/2017 3:43:14 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Applauds House of Representatives on Reauthorization of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Act8589942931A10330False010/5/2017 07:16:51 AM10/3/2017 03:43:14 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Applauds-House-of-Representatives-on-Reauthorization-of-Early-Hearing-Detection-and-Intervention-Act/8589945264ContentASHA Applauds Launch of New WHO Campaign/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Applauds-Launch-of-New-WHO-Campaign/ASHA promotes the launch of the new World Health Organization (WHO) Make Listening Safe campaign on International Ear Care Day.American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Applauds Launch of New WHO CampaignAssociation Served as Advisor to WHO on Campaign's Development, Will Promote Campaign Messages and Resources Throughout the YearRockvilleMD2015-03-03Today is International Ear Care Day, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is using the occasion to applaud and promote the launch of Make Listening Safe, a new campaign by the World Health Organization (WHO) for stemming the threat of noise-induced hearing loss.The WHO campaign aims to encourage young people to practice safe listening when they recreate, be that listening to personal audio technology, attending concerts or sporting events, or engaging in other forms of entertainment.More than 43 million people 12–35 years of age worldwide live with disabling hearing loss from various causes, according to WHO. To keep such numbers from increasing, the agency is launching Make Listening Safe today.In a statement for the launch event at WHO headquarters in Geneva, ASHA President Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, said ASHA was honored to have collaborated with WHO on the development of the new campaign and is committed to spreading its safe listening messages."Giving a warning about a debilitating condition that forms as insidiously as noise-induced hearing loss can be challenging," Dr. Page noted, "yet delivery of this warning is demanded by the potential substantial costs involved, individual and societal, in vital areas like academic performance, employment opportunities, and social development and interaction."In part, ASHA plans to share information about WHO's campaign though a long-standing safe listening effort of its own, Listen To Your Buds. WHO considers ASHA's Buds campaign an effective outreach tool and its awareness of the campaign prompted the global health agency to invite ASHA to collaborate on Make Listening Safe.Some of ASHA's efforts are expected to culminate in May, Better Hearing and Speech Month in the United States. Current plans for May include a safe-listening concert for children in Washington, DC, and the release of a new national survey related to the topic of safe listening. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM4/3/2015 10:48:33 AM3/2/2015 2:10:28 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Applauds Launch of New WHO Campaign8589935339A10330False04/3/2015 10:48:33 AM3/2/2015 02:10:28 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Applauds-Launch-of-New-WHO-Campaign/8589977143ContentASHA Applauds U.S. Senator Ben Cardin's Call for Congressional Action on Therapy Caps/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/ASHA-Applauds-U-S--Senator-Ben-Cardin-s-Call-for-Congressional-Action-on-Therapy-Caps/ASHA applauds U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) for urging his fellow legislators to address long existing caps on outpatient therapy under Medicare Part B as Congress prepares to move on from the recent U.S. federal government shutdown to determining the nation's budget.ASHA Applauds U.S. Senator Ben Cardin's Call for Congressional Action on Therapy CapsGroup Urges Immediate Cap Repeal to Protect Millions of Medicare BeneficiariesRockvilleMD2018-01-22The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) applauded today U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) for urging his fellow legislators to address long existing caps on outpatient therapy under Medicare Part B as Congress prepares to move on from the recent U.S. federal government shutdown to determining the nation's budget."Therapy caps mean that those who have the most serious needs for therapy services—those suffering from stroke—those types of injuries—are not able to get the full services or are at least threatened to not get the full services," Cardin said in remarks he delivered today on the Senate floor.Though the caps were established through legislation that Congress passed 20 years ago, over the years since, annual temporary fixes have kept them from being implemented. The caps "should never have been put into law" in the first place, Cardin noted."We thank Senator Cardin for speaking out, and we urge lawmakers to join with him in ending the caps as soon as possible," ASHA President Elise Davis-McFarland, PhD, CCC-SLP, said. "Until they do, the health of millions of Americans is vulnerable to the impact of limited treatment." For 2018, the therapy cap is $2,010 for speech-language pathology and physical therapy services combined—not nearly enough to meet the needs.Under the caps, Medicare beneficiaries who suffer from speech-language disorders due to life-altering events—such as stroke, head injury, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease—risk being denied therapy and/or being forced to pay out of pocket for services to help them regain their ability to communicate effectively.   ASHA has long been a leading advocate for full repeal of the caps, which restrict access to vital outpatient rehabilitative services in settings such as skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation hospitals, and clinics. Just last month, ASHA joined with 25 other leading health and consumer organizations in sending a letter to Congress that urged repealing the caps. Last October, a bicameral and bipartisan policy agreement was reached in Congress to move ahead with a permanent repeal of the caps."I ask all ASHA members to contact their members of Congress today to urge them to repeal the Medicare therapy caps," Davis-McFarland said. "That would be an important way of helping to ensure high-quality, medically necessary treatment for Medicare beneficiaries as well as remove uncertainty for beneficiaries and therapy providers alike."About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/23/2018 11:54:10 AM1/23/2018 11:54:10 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Applauds U.S. Senator Ben Cardin's Call for Congressional Action on Therapy Caps8589943539A10330False01/23/2018 11:54:10 AM1/23/2018 11:54:10 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/ASHA-Applauds-U-S--Senator-Ben-Cardin-s-Call-for-Congressional-Action-on-Therapy-Caps/8589947049ContentASHA Calls for Continued Universal Screening of Toddlers for Autism Spectrum Disorder/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Calls-for-Continued-Universal-Screening-of-Toddlers-for-Autism-Spectrum-Disorder/ASHA is urging the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) to revise its new draft statement indicating insufficient evidence to support universal screening of ASD in the general population of young children. ASHA Calls for Continued Universal Screening of Toddlers for Autism Spectrum DisorderAssociation Joins Autism Advocates, Nation's Pediatricians in Urging the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force to Revise New Draft Statement RockvilleMD2015-08-26In light of a dramatic and well-documented increase in the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among U.S. children, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is urging the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) to revise its new draft statement indicating insufficient evidence to support universal screening of ASD in the general population of young children. Specifically, USPSTF states that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for ASD in children for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised by parents or clinical providers (asymptomatic children).At the same time, the task force's review found adequate evidence that currently available screening tests can detect ASD in children ages 18 to 30 months. It also found that the harms of screening for ASD and subsequent interventions are small. Although the task force's statement is not a directive to end the practice of universal screening, ASHA and other organizations are nonetheless worried that the wording could be misinterpreted to the detriment of children's health."As the number of children in the United States affected by autism has currently risen to one in every 68 children, now is not the time to risk any scaling back of screening among 18- through 24-month-olds-screening that has been recommended practice since 2007," said 2015 ASHA President Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP. "To the contrary, we need to be more vigilant, not less. This is especially true given what we know about the often profound, lifelong impact of ASD on children and their families, the transformative benefits of early intervention, the relative ease of screening in pediatricians' offices, the effectiveness of current screening tests, and the lack of evidence that any harm comes from such screenings." She continued, "Although we agree that more research is needed in this area, the possibility that some may interpret this statement as a call to limit screening-which may result in missed opportunities for early diagnosis of ASD during a critical developmental window for children who can benefit from early intervention-is a significant concern."Advocacy groups Autism Speaks and the Autism Science Foundation have also asked USPSTF to revise its draft statement, as has the American Academy of Pediatrics. ASHA is also recommending changes to the accompanying rationale and FAQs. The task force is accepting public comments through August 31.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/8/26/2015 12:30:00 PM8/26/2015 12:30:01 PM8/26/2015 11:19:47 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Calls for Continued Universal Screening of Toddlers for Autism Spectrum Disorder8/26/2015 12:30:00 PM8589935339A10330False08/26/2015 12:30:01 PM8/26/2015 11:19:47 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Calls-for-Continued-Universal-Screening-of-Toddlers-for-Autism-Spectrum-Disorder/8589974532ContentASHA Campaign Wins Gold from the Stevie Awards Program/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Campaign-Wins-Gold-from-the-Stevie-Awards-Program/ASHA's Value of the CCCs campaign has won the Gold Award for the "Marketing Campaign of the Year for Corporate Reputation/Professional Services" category of the Stevie Awards Program.ASHA Campaign Wins Gold from the Stevie Awards ProgramRockvilleMD2017-05-17The Value of the CCCs campaign of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has won a Gold Award for being the top entry in the "Marketing Campaign of the Year for Corporate Reputation/Professional Services" category of the Stevie Awards Program.ASHA's campaign focuses on raising awareness of the value of ASHA's Certificate of Clinical Competence, plus it highlights those ASHA members who have earned the credential."We are honored to have won Gold for our Value of the CCCs campaign," ASHA President Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, said. "It is very exciting and gratifying to receive recognition for a campaign that prominently features ASHA-certified members." The Stevie Awards program has several different competitions. ASHA's campaign won in its American Business Awards program. More than 3,600 nominations from organizations of all sizes and in virtually every industry were submitted this year for consideration in a wide range of categories. More than 190 professionals worldwide participated in the judging process to select the winners."Each year, the judges find the quality and variety of the nominations to be greater than the year before," Michael Gallagher, President and Founder of the Stevie Awards, said. "The 2017 competition was intense, and every organization that has won should be proud."About The American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationThe American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students.About the Stevie AwardsStevie Awards are conferred in seven programs: the Asia-Pacific Stevie Awards, the German Stevie Awards, The American Business Awards, The International Business Awards, the Stevie Awards for Women in Business, the Stevie Awards for Great Employers, and the Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Service. Stevie Awards competitions receive more than 10,000 entries each year from organizations in more than 60 nations. Honoring organizations of all types and sizes and the people behind them, the Stevies recognize outstanding performances in the workplace worldwide. Learn more about the Stevie Awards at http://www.StevieAwards.com. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/18/2017 5:38:43 PM5/17/2017 9:55:17 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Campaign Wins Gold from the Stevie Awards Program8589942931A10330False05/18/2017 05:38:43 PM5/17/2017 09:55:17 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Campaign-Wins-Gold-from-the-Stevie-Awards-Program/8589976529ContentASHA CEO Named Association Executive of The Year/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-CEO-Named-Association-Executive-of-The-Year/Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE, CEO of the American Speech Language-Hearing Association, has been named "Association Executive of the Year" by Association TRENDS, a leading national source of association news and information.ASHA CEO Named "Association Executive of The Year"RockvilleMD2017-12-12Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE, CEO of the American Speech Language-Hearing Association, has been named "Association Executive of the Year" by Association TRENDS, a leading national source of association news and information.According to Association TRENDS, its award honors national association or professional society chief executives who demonstrate exemplary leadership and embody the very best values of professionalism, creativity, and commitment within the association community."It is humbling to join the ranks of such remarkable previous awardees," Pietranton said about being honored. "Most of all, though, I am deeply grateful to the many generous friends and colleagues in the association community from and with whom I have learned so much."This is the second time Pietranton has won such an award. CEO Update named her Professional Society CEO of the Year in 2015. Also, she is only the third top association executive to be honored by both Association TRENDS and CEO Update.Since Pietranton became CEO in 2004, ASHA has experienced steady membership growth and high member retention rates. Currently, the association represents nearly 192,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language support personnel; and students.Pietranton has also overseen a governance restructure, the introduction of a slew of new member programs and services, and a series of award-winning outreach campaigns. Recognized regularly as one of the DC area's "great places to work," ASHA recently marked its 10th year housed in the Gold LEED–certified building that it constructed during Pietranton's time as CEO. Such a high "green building" certification ranking had never been achieved before by a 501(c)6 association in Maryland.In the broader association community and elsewhere, Pietranton has consistently been a leader, as well. A former Chair of the Board of Directors of the American Society of Association Executives and the current Secretary of the Council of Engineering and Scientific Society Executive Board of Directors, she has been very active in many different ways in a variety of national, state, and local professional and civic organizations.Pietranton will receive the 2018 Association TRENDS "Association Executive of the Year" award at a March 1 luncheon at the Capital Hilton, Washington, DC.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org  1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM12/12/2017 6:22:38 PM12/12/2017 9:13:15 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA CEO Named Association Executive of The Year8589942931A10330False012/12/2017 06:22:38 PM12/12/2017 09:13:15 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-CEO-Named-Association-Executive-of-The-Year/8589977410ContentASHA Commends Congress on Passage of Two Critical Health Initiatives for Medicare Beneficiaries/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/ASHA-Commends-Congress-on-Passage-of-Two-Critical-Health-Initiatives-for-Medicare-Beneficiaries/ASHA congratulates Congress on today's vote to repeal therapy caps under Medicare Part B and make permanent the coverage of speech-generating devices as routinely purchased durable medical equipment.ASHA Commends Congress on Passage of Two Critical Health Initiatives for Medicare BeneficiariesContinuing Resolution Includes Permanent Repeal of Therapy Caps and Permanent Coverage of Speech-Generating Devices Under MedicareRockvilleMD2018-02-09The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) congratulates Congress on today's vote that permanently repeals the annual limit on per-patient therapy expenditures (therapy caps) under Medicare Part B and makes permanent (under Medicare) the coverage of speech-generating devices as routinely purchased durable medical equipment. Both provisions were included in the final version of the Continuing Resolution (CR) to fund the government for the next 2 years. Therapy caps unduly impact the most vulnerable patients, who may have suffered serious medical issues such as a stroke or who may have chronic conditions that require life-altering rehabilitation services. These caps have existed for 20 years, but annual temporary fixes were put into effect to keep them from being implemented in 16 instances. On January 1, an annual hard cap of $2,010 combined for speech and physical therapy services for 2018 went into effect—and reports from ASHA members confirmed that it had already begun to impact patient care. "Millions of Medicare beneficiaries can now—finally—breathe a bit easier when it comes to getting access to critical rehabilitation services they require following a serious health episode," said Elise Davis-McFarland, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2018 ASHA President. "The last thing these patients need in the face of serious illness or injury is to have to choose between financial ruin or forgoing much-needed care that has a strong potential to transform their life. We are grateful that Congress has taken action on the therapy caps."Also included in the CR is a provision to permanently cover the purchase of speech-generating devices (SGDs) under Medicare, based on the Steve Gleason Enduring Voices Act of 2017. SGDs are highly customized electronic augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices—which are used to supplement or replace speech, allowing people with functional communication impairments to verbally communicate their needs. The largest population of those who need SGDs are individuals with neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [ALS], Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis [MS]). These are conditions where cognitive function and the need for communication is intact, but the physiological ability to speak diminishes. SGDs are the only effective communication means for these people. Prior to passage of the original bill in 2015, if an SGD user resided in a nursing home, hospice, or hospital, Medicare payment for their SGD stopped because the item needed to be rented rather than purchased. Many of these facilities did not and could not supply beneficiaries with a uniquely customized substitute."We deeply appreciate that Congress addressed speech-generating devices in the Continuing Resolution," added Davis-McFarland. "These devices are truly lifelines for patients with conditions that would otherwise rob them of their ability to effectively communicate—and they deserve access to them."Among other key provisions in the CR were an additional 4-year extension to fund the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), ensuring that it is funded through 2027, and further funding for the National Health Service Corps to help support graduate education for health care professionals—including audiologists and speech-language pathologists.  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM2/9/2018 9:18:22 AM2/9/2018 9:09:11 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Commends Congress on Passage of Two Critical Health Initiatives for Medicare Beneficiaries8589943539A10330False02/9/2018 09:18:22 AM2/9/2018 09:09:11 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/ASHA-Commends-Congress-on-Passage-of-Two-Critical-Health-Initiatives-for-Medicare-Beneficiaries/8589970677ContentASHA Earns Top Workplace Honor from The Washington Post for Third Year in a Row/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHA-Earns-Top-Workplace-Honor-from-The-Washington-Post-for-Third-Year-in-a-Row/The Washington Post names ASHA as a top workplace for third consecutive year.ASHA Earns Top Workplace Honor from The Washington Post for Third Year in a RowRockvilleMD2016-06-17In a ceremony held last night in Washington, DC, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) was named a top workplace by The Washington Post. This is the third straight year ASHA has earned this recognition.The Top Workplaces program is based on employee’s opinions of their employers. To assess this, The Washington Post partners with the company WorkplaceDynamics—which gathers feedback through its extensive employee survey. WorkplaceDynamics partners with more than 40 prestigious media partners across the United States to award top workplaces by region. It has surveyed more than 33,000 organizations and 11 million employees to date.According to WorkplaceDynamics, organizations that score well in these three areas are ‘healthy’:Direction, which is about employees being emotionally bought into what the organization is striving to achieve.Execution, which is about the company having a high performance culture.Connection, which is about employees feeling they are being appreciated and doing something meaningful."We are honored to be recognized as a top workplace by The Washington Post for the third straight year," said ASHA CEO Arlene Pietranton, PhD, CAE. "At ASHA, we work hard to maintain a supportive and collaborative workplace that our employees are proud to be a part of—both because of how they are treated and the excellent work that they do on a daily basis to support our 186,000 members in the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology."ASHA has a long record of fostering an environment that prioritizes work/life balance, wellness, social responsibility, diversity and inclusion, and professional development.For more information about working at ASHA, visit www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/WorkAtASHA/. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/17/2016 6:43:56 PM6/17/2016 9:32:13 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Earns Top Workplace Honor from The Washington Post for Third Year in a Row8589942122A10330False06/17/2016 06:43:56 PM6/17/2016 09:32:13 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHA-Earns-Top-Workplace-Honor-from-The-Washington-Post-for-Third-Year-in-a-Row/8589944649ContentASHA Engages with World Health Organization/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Engages-with-World-Health-Organization/ASHA will work with the World Health Organization in an advisory capacity on their new safe listening initiative.ASHA Engages With World Health Organization On Hearing Protection EffortASHA's Listen To Your Buds Campaign To Be Cited As Effective ToolWHO Initiative Will Seek To "Make Listening Safe" During Leisure ActivitiesRockvilleMD2014-11-03The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has joined an advisory group to the World Health Organization (WHO) on the development of a WHO initiative that will seek to inform policy makers and educate the public about the risk of hearing loss from noisy leisure activities, with listening to loud music a highlighted concern.Entitled "Make Listening Safe," the effort will debut next year. WHO asked ASHA to serve as an advisor, noting that the Rockville, Maryland organization's Listen To Your Buds campaign http://www.asha.org/buds/ has been an effective public education tool about the risk of hearing loss from regular high volume listening to personal audio technology."We are excited by and very appreciative of the opportunity to work with WHO on 'Make Listening Safe,'" ASHA President Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, said. "With hearing loss a leading disability worldwide, it's indeed fitting for the call for safe listening to go out globally." ASHA's collaboration with WHO marks one more development in the growth of its international stature and involvement.Recently, the Pan American Health Organization officially recognized ASHA as an NGO in part because of the technical assistance ASHA is providing to several Central American countries that are building their capacities for addressing communication disorders.Additionally, ASHA is a founder of the International Communication Project 2014 (www.communication2014.com). Dedicated to raising public awareness of communication disorders, this unprecedented collaborative effort has attracted more than 50 participating organizations around the globe, since it debuted in January. Meanwhile, the Listen To Your Buds campaign continues. Later this month, it will put on six "safe listening" concerts in schools in Orlando, Florida. In recent years, the campaign has reached out directly to schools and school systems across the United States, from Washington, DC, to Los Angeles; from Chicago to New Orleans. Its Florida concerts will coincide with the opening of ASHA's 2014 Convention in Orlando. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/.11/3/2014 7:00:00 AM11/3/2014 12:21:53 PM10/31/2014 10:56:38 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Engages with World Health Organization11/3/2014 07:00:00 AM8589935226A10330False011/3/2014 12:21:53 PM10/31/2014 10:56:38 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Engages-with-World-Health-Organization/8589970578ContentASHA Honored With Four Awards From the Alliance for Workplace Excellence for 2016/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHA-Honored-With-Four-Awards-From-the-Alliance-for-Workplace-Excellence-for-2016/ASHA received four awards from the Alliance for Workplace Excellence for 2016.ASHA Honored With Four Awards From the Alliance for Workplace Excellence for 2016Montgomery County, Maryland Employer a Leader in Diversity, EcoLeadership, Health and Wellness, and Overall Workplace QualityRockvilleMD2016-06-10In a ceremony held today in Bethesda, Maryland, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) was recognized by the Alliance for Workplace Excellence (AWE) in each of its four major employer awards categories for 2016.The annual AWE awards program honors employers for their exemplary commitment to building excellent places to work in Montgomery County and throughout the United States. ASHA has earned AWE's Award of Excellence since 1999, when the award was first created. ASHA has earned each of the other awards every year since the awards' inception."ASHA is once again thrilled and honored to earn these prestigious awards from the Alliance for Workplace Excellence," said Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE, chief executive officer of ASHA. "It is a gratifying recognition of the efforts we continually make to foster an inclusive, diverse, healthy, and socially responsible workplace—one that well represents our membership of audiologists and speech-language pathologists that is guided by the same principles."ASHA earned the following awards:Diversity Champion Award—Diversity Champions are companies committed to creating a diverse and inclusive work environment. Their diversity initiatives extend beyond their workplace to include diversity in their products and services and supplier diversity. Applicants are recognized on the basis of many components, including leadership, workforce demographics, and diversity in products and services.EcoLeadership Award—Award-winning employers demonstrate commitment to environmental sustainability in the following categories: waste minimization, water conservation, pollution prevention, environmentally conscious travel, and energy efficiency. To be considered for the award, businesses must complete a comprehensive and rigorous assessment process led by an independent review panel of academics and business professionals.Health & Wellness Seal of Approval—Employers that earn this award provide innovative programs for employee health and wellness. These programs may include health risk assessments; employee health fairs; support for physical activity and healthy eating programs; on-site fitness facilities; healthy options at food facilities; employee access to nurses, coaches, and other professionals; educational sessions on healthy lifestyles; and incentives for participation in wellness programs.Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval—Applicants undergo a comprehensive evaluation process in order to be considered for this award. The winners demonstrate outstanding commitment to balanced leadership and the overall success of their workforce. They are assessed in the following areas: innovative corporate culture and management practices; family- and employee-friendly policies and programs; strong health and wellness initiatives; employee growth and learning opportunities; commitment to corporate, social, and civic responsibility; diversity and inclusion practices; flexible work environment; and safety and security.For more information about working at ASHA and a list of current job openings, visit http://www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/10/2016 2:58:46 PM6/10/2016 11:59:47 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Honored With Four Awards From the Alliance for Workplace Excellence for 20168589942122A10330False06/10/2016 02:58:46 PM6/10/2016 11:59:47 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHA-Honored-With-Four-Awards-From-the-Alliance-for-Workplace-Excellence-for-2016/8589945772ContentASHA Honored With New Workplace Award/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Honored-With-New-Workplace-Award/ASHA received the Best Practices Supporting Workers of All Abilities award from the Alliance for Workplace Excellence.ASHA One of Only Two Organizations Honored With New Workplace AwardFor 16th Straight Year, Association Also Earns Workplace Excellence Seal of ApprovalRockvilleMD2015-05-01The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has received the new Best Practices Supporting Workers of All Abilities award from the Alliance for Workplace Excellence (AWE), a nonprofit organization that encourages employers to support the quality of life for employees, their families, and the community.AWE is honoring only two employers this year with its new award, which recognizes workplace cultures that support a diverse and inclusive workforce, especially workers of all abilities. The other honored employer is the Montgomery County, Maryland, government."It is a distinct honor to be one of the two first recipients of the Best Practices award," said ASHA CEO Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE. "We thank AWE for the recognition and salute it for using the award to promote diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace."ASHA has also earned the Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval Award from AWE for the 16th straight year since the inception of the honor, which recognizes companies' exemplary commitment to workplace quality. Additionally, ASHA won honors in these specific AWE awards categories, something it has achieved since each was created:Health & Wellness Seal of Approval, which goes to employers who offer their employees innovative programs in health and wellnessDiversity Champion Award, which honors employers dedicated to providing their employees with a diverse and inclusive workforceEcoLeadership Award, which honors commitment to environmental sustainability through waste minimization, water conservation, pollution prevention, environmentally conscious travel, and energy efficiency"We are grateful for and inspired by the recognition ASHA has received with all of the AWE awards it has received," ASHA CEO Pietranton added. "We go forward with renewed commitment to achieving even better results in the future in each area of the awards program."ASHA will be presented with its awards at a May 21 AWE awards program luncheon at the Bethesda North Hotel and Conference Center.More information about ASHA's work environment can be found at www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/WorkAtASHA/. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/4/2015 1:55:22 PM5/1/2015 12:07:05 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Honored With New Workplace Award8589935339A10330False05/4/2015 01:55:22 PM5/1/2015 12:07:05 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Honored-With-New-Workplace-Award/8589963752ContentASHA Named One of Washingtonians 50 Great Places to Work/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Named-One-of-Washingtonians-50-Great-Places-to-Work/Washingtonian magazine again names ASHA one of 50 great places to work.ASHA Named One of Washingtonian's 50 Great Places to WorkDesignation Is Fifth One for ASHA in 9 Years of Washingtonian's Program and Fourth Major Workplace Award for Association This Year RockvilleMD2015-10-22The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has earned a spot on Washingtonian magazine's 50 Great Places to Work list for 2015, it was announced today. This marks the fifth time the Association has been recognized by Washingtonian in the 9 years it has published the list.The 50 winning workplaces were selected on the basis of such measures as competitive pay and benefits, challenging and interesting work, excellent work/life balance, opportunities to learn and grow, commitment to charity and community, and recognition and respect given to employees.Winners were chosen after reviewing nearly 200 companies and close to 10,000 employee surveys. The final determinations relied heavily on the scores given by a company's employees."We are thrilled to be recognized by Washingtonian magazine," said Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE, Chief Executive Officer, ASHA. "In a region that is home to large corporations, government agencies, contractors, information technology firms, associations, and more, to be distinguished as a top workplace is a true honor."She added, "ASHA is committed to fostering an atmosphere where all employees can do their best work, which involves promoting work/life balance, diversity, wellness, social responsibility, and professional development. All of this allows us to most effectively serve our members. A recognition such as this one by Washingtonian is a tremendous added bonus."The Washingtonian list is the fourth major recognition ASHA has received this year for its commitment to employees. The others are the Alliance for Workplace Excellence's awards, Washington Business Journal's Healthiest Employer awards, and The Washington Post's Top Workplace awards.More details about Washingtonian magazine's Great Places to Work list for 2015 will be available in the November issue of Washingtonian magazine. For more information about working at ASHA, visit http://www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/WorkAtASHA/.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM10/22/2015 6:50:35 PM10/22/2015 6:36:25 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Named One of Washingtonians 50 Great Places to Work8589935339A10330False010/22/2015 06:50:35 PM10/22/2015 06:36:25 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Named-One-of-Washingtonians-50-Great-Places-to-Work/8589971229ContentASHA Names 2016 Media Award Winners/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHA-Names-2016-Media-Award-Winners/ASHA names 2016 Media Award winners including media outlets and member outreach champions.ASHA Names 2016 Media Award WinnersAssociation Recognizes News Outlets for Outstanding Coverage and Member Experts for Outreach WorkRockvilleMD2016-08-02In recognition of exceptional news reporting that contributed to improved public awareness about communication disorders, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has selected seven media outlets as winners of its 2016 Media Awards.ASHA also has named six member experts as its Media Outreach Champions, honoring their efforts to advance public education of speech, language, and hearing disorders.The 2016 Media Award winners are as follows:Broadcast MediaColorado Public Radio: For its story, How to Get Kids to Turn the Volume Down and Save Their Ears, the station asked kids about their device listening habits, spotlighted ASHA's Listen To Your Buds education campaign, and provided expert advice to parents on how to protect kids' hearing.NBC News Feeder Service: An interview with ASHA 2016 President Jaynee Handelsman during Better Hearing & Speech Month was syndicated to local NBC stations around the country through the feeder service—showcasing new ASHA poll findings on families' use of technology and promoting a "digital diet" to reduce solitary tech time in favor of communication.This Morning With Gordon Deal: The nationally syndicated radio program welcomed Handelsman for a lengthy segment about technology habits and the potential impact on speech and language development as well as hearing in children and teenagers.Digital MediaHealthyChildren.org: The consumer website for the American Academy of Pediatrics published numerous stories related to children's communication health, including Parents of Young Children: Put Down Your Smartphones and How to Raise Concerns About a Child's Speech and Language Development: Do's and Don'ts.Print MediaOrange County Register/Center for Health Reporting:Big Money in Nursing Home Therapy, but Is All the Treatment Necessary? delved into the issue of practitioners who work in nursing homes—including speech-language pathologists—being pressured to provide inappropriate treatment for maximum Medicare payouts.Daily Orange: The student newspaper (Daily Orange) for Syracuse University published an investigative piece titled Double Talk: Syracuse University Institute Continues to Use Discredited Technique With Dangerous Effects. The article examined the Institute's use and promotion of a practice called facilitated communication, which purports to enable people who are nonverbal to communicate via keyboard typing—with assistance from a trained facilitator. Communication experts including a prominent speech-language pathologist were featured in the piece.Roll Call: The Capitol Hill publication printed the ASHA op-ed, Don't Cut Corners on Veterans' Hearing Care, which advocates for ensuring that veterans with hearing loss and tinnitus (two of the top service–related disabilities) continue to receive care from audiologists as opposed to "hearing aid specialists." These specialists often possess only a high school education or equivalent, and some technical training—not adequate to assess the often complex health needs of veterans.ASHA's Member Media Outreach Champions for 2016 are:Lisa Cannon, AuD, CCC-A: The educational audiologist with the Denver Public School System played an instrumental role in the success of ASHA's Listen To Your Buds outreach during the 2015 ASHA Convention in her city. Cannon served as a spokesperson during multiple television and radio interviews—including the local NPR station and ABC and NBC TV affiliates—offering expertise about noise-induced hearing loss and prevention strategies.Starr Cookman, MA, CCC-SLP: Frustrated with the lack of coverage by many insurance companies for treating voice disorders—which affect 3% to 7% of the population and can cost billions in lost productivity—Cookman championed ways to publicize this issue. She was instrumental in helping ASHA develop a podcast on the topic, which served to both raise public awareness and help put pressure on insurance companies to cover services.Kate McConville, MS, CCC-SLP: Capitalizing on a newsworthy issue, this speech-language pathologist at the University of Wisconsin Health Voice and Swallow Clinics made a number of effective media appearances on the speaking styles of the presidential hopefuls and their levels of vocal strain, including this piece on Wisconsin public radio.Nan Bernstein Ratner, PhD, CCC-SLP: A professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park, Bernstein Ratner has served as an expert source for media on many communication topics, including stuttering songbirds. In particular, her work has helped raise public awareness about research breakthroughs in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Most recently, her key involvement in research on noise in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)—which she presented at the 2016 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)—has yielded significant media attention.Laura Smith, MA, CCC-SLP: After this Colorado-based speech-language pathologist and mother of a daughter with apraxia of speech read about famed MMA fighter Ronda Rousey's (never diagnosed) childhood struggles with communication, Smith approached Rousey at a local book signing and made her aware of apraxia (as detailed in her blog post). That led to national and even international media attention, including Good Morning America and USA Today—raising significant awareness about the disorder. Smith has continued her education efforts.Janice Trent, AuD, CCC-A: The first member to be recognized twice for an ASHA media award, Audiologist Janice Trent has consistently embraced any opportunity to raise awareness about hearing loss and promote her profession. A longtime spokesperson for Listen To Your Buds, Trent also has been an essential part of ASHA's Value of the CCCs campaign, as the subject of both print and digital ads. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM8/17/2016 4:27:40 PM8/2/2016 6:35:29 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherASHA Names 2016 Media Award Winners8589942122A10330False08/17/2016 04:27:40 PM8/2/2016 06:35:29 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHA-Names-2016-Media-Award-Winners/8589975648ContentASHA Names 2017 Media Award Winners/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Names-2017-Media-Award-Winners/ ASHA announces its 2017 Media Awards recipients.ASHA Names 2017 Media Award WinnersAssociation Recognizes News Outlets for Outstanding Coverage and Member Experts for Outreach WorkRockvilleMD2017-08-08The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has announced today its 2017 Media Awards. The organization granted fourteen honors to media outlets and ASHA member "Media Outreach Champions," and named one special award winner.The 2017 Media Award winners are as follows:Print MediaThe Washington Post: For its July 9, 2017, op-ed, "Eating Out May Be Bad for Your Ears," by ASHA President Gail Richard, which raised the problem of noise in restaurants and offered readers steps that they can take to protect their hearing. The article drew subsequently appeared in other major media outlets including the Chicago Tribune and The Philadelphia Inquirer.Consumer Reports: For Julia Calderone's February 2, 2017, comprehensive report on hearing loss, "Hearing Loss: No More Suffering in Silence?," which detailed the various options available to abate the problem of hearing loss. Calderone gave a detailed history of the development of hearing aid technology and provided a comprehensive look at how health care professionals administer treatment for hearing loss. In the report, Calderone also explored over-the-counter personal sound amplification devices (also known as PSAPs), while cautioning that experts suggest professional management of moderate to severe hearing loss. The New York Times: For its April 25, 2017, story by Catherine Saint Louis that featured eight individuals—seven speech-language-pathologists (SLPs) and one student—who spoke about the growing field of voice modification for transgender individuals. The article, "Learning To Talk Like a Woman (or Man)," also included a Facebook Live chat with SLPs that received 229,000+ views.Web MD Magazine: For its January/February 2017 issue, which included advice from audiologists Pamela Mason, MEd, CCC-A and Tina Penman, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA in a summary on hearing health. The segment featured lifestyle tips for coping with hearing loss—an issue that affects one in five Americans.Digital MediaAutism Speaks Official Blog: ASHA President Gail J. Richard and Autism Speaks Vice President for Clinical Programs Donna Murray penned a primer on May 15, 2017, for the services offered by speech-language-pathologists (SLPs). The article explained how SLPs assist in the early identification of autism and help people with autism achieve effective social communication.U.S. News & World Report: Advice from speech-language pathologists (SLPs) accompanied testimonies from people who stutter and their family members in the February 2, 2017, article, "How to Help Someone Who Stutters." In the article, Author Lisa Esposito detailed how adults and children with stutters work with SLPs to improve their speech.Slate: With advice from ASHA's Director of Speech-Language Pathology Professional Practices Diane Paul, the August 22, 2016, article, "Yes, You Eated Gogurt for Bekfast!," by Melinda Wenner Moyer addressed parents' worries that repeating "baby talk" will harm their child's speech development. Linguist Arika Okrent joined Paul, however, in stressing the importance of being a positive speech model and pointing out the red flags that might lead a parent to seek care.Broadcast MediaABC TV/Philadelphia: For its November 14, 2016, story with reporter Katherine Scott covering an ASHA children's concert promoting safe listening that took place at a South Philadelphia elementary school. Performer Jazzy Ash of Jazzy Ash and the Leaping Lizards spoke to her audience of children about the dangers of noise-induced hearing loss. Science Friday: Following a motor vehicle accident, Pediatric Audiologist Allyson Sisler-Dinwiddie lost all her hearing over the course of 6 months. Although her cochlear implant (CI) restored her hearing, it could muddy sound when overstimulated. In a September 9, 2016, broadcast, Reporter Emily Driscoll followed the work of Rene Gifford in developing an experimental technique of improving the quality of CIs by turning off individual stimulating electrodes.NBC News: Technology company VocaliD tackles the problem of depersonalized voices for those who use computerized devices to speak. Using a database of recordings from human volunteers, along with the sounds that individuals with severe speech disorders are able to make, VocaliD can develop a custom voice for each patient. For a segment broadcasted on January 21, 2017, John Torres, M.D. with NBC News interviewed Leo True-Frost, a middle schooler with cerebral palsy, as he debuted his own voice from VocaliD.WYUU Tampa: Pamela Torres, MS, CCC-SLP, CAS—a speech-language pathologist with two bilingual children—spoke with Interviewer Christy Balderrama on June 4, 2017. Drawing from her experience as a therapist, Torres explored the development of bilingual children and dispelled common myths about growing up bilingual.ASHA's Member Media Outreach Champions for 2017Amee Shah, PhD, CCC-SLP: Shah has promoted public awareness of the communication sciences and disorders (CSD) discipline in numerous media interviews over the years. She most recently spoke with Slate, national known broadcaster John Tesh, and wine publication VinePair about voice, language, and accent modification.Joy Peterson, AuD, CCC-A: Peterson gave an extensive interview with The Philadelphia Inquirer (conducted by Kids Health Assistant Editor Anna Nguyen) and spoke with Lauren Mayk at NBC in Philadelphia last November about the risk of noise-induced hearing loss from music and popular technology. These interviews were given in conjunction with a series of "safe listening" concerts that ASHA produced in Philadelphia schools. Along with simple guidelines—turning down the volume and taking listening breaks—Peterson revealed some of the risks stemming from the growing problem of noise-induced hearing loss. According to Peterson, children with hearing loss—a preventable but irreversible condition—achieve, on average, one to four grades lower than their peers with normal hearing, barring appropriate management.Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP: Coleman has done comprehensive work over the years in educating the public about stuttering in children. In a December 27, 2016, article for healthychildren.org, he explained the differences between typical disfluencies in toddlers and signs of stuttering. One example comes from a chart shared by Coleman in which the act of repeating phrases is considered a normal disfluency and the act of repeating syllables is considered a sign of stuttering. Coleman stressed the importance of getting an evaluation from a speech-language pathologist upon noticing signs of stuttering because a stutter is unlikely to go away completely after 7 years of age.Special AwardKaiser Permanente Center for Total Health: As part of its imagining of a world centered upon better health, Kaiser Permanente featured two ads from ASHA's Identify the Signs campaign at its Center for Total Health in Washington, DC. One exhibit at the Center depicts a re-created street scene with a bus stop where the ads were prominently displayed throughout Better Hearing and Speech Month this year. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM9/24/2017 7:45:12 AM8/8/2017 2:31:21 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Names 2017 Media Award Winners8589942931A10330False09/24/2017 07:45:12 AM8/8/2017 02:31:21 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Names-2017-Media-Award-Winners/8589943798ContentASHA Recognized as a Top Workplace/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Recognized-as-a-Top-Workplace/The Washington Post has recognized ASHA as one of their Top Workplaces in the DC Metro area.The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Recognized by The Washington Post as a "Top Workplace"RockvilleMD2014-06-23The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is pleased to announce that it has been recognized as one of The Washington Post Top Workplaces in the Greater Washington area. The Top Workplaces program evaluates and recognizes the best employers in 30 regions across the country based on employee opinions expressed in the Workplace Dynamics employee survey. The survey includes 22 questions to measure employee engagement, organizational health, and overall satisfaction. "We are honored to be recognized as a Top Workplace in the DC area," said ASHA's Chief Executive Officer Arlene Pietranton. "At ASHA, we truly believe that a great workplace is essential to attracting and retaining a talented and engaged workforce, which in turn allows us to better serve the dedicated speech-language pathologists and audiologists who make up our membership."ASHA's recognition as a top workplace reflects employee satisfaction in the survey's three key organizational categories: overall direction of the company, execution of the company's work, and employees' connection to the overall mission. On June 22, ASHA was featured in a special edition of The Washington Post and profiled on TopWorkplaces.com.For more information on ASHA's workplace environment, visit the Careers section of ASHA's website.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/23/2014 2:40:47 PM6/23/2014 9:35:43 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Recognized as a Top Workplace8589935226A10330False06/23/2014 02:40:47 PM6/23/2014 09:35:43 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Recognized-as-a-Top-Workplace/8589946652ContentASHA Recognized as Top Area Workplace by The Washington Post/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Recognized-as-Top-Area-Workplace-by-The-Washington-Post/ASHA named Top Place to work by Washington Post for second consecutive year.ASHA Recognized as Top Area Workplace by The Washington PostRockvilleMD2015-06-22For the 2nd straight year, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has earned a "Top Workplace" honor for the Greater Washington Area from The Washington Post. The Top Workplaces program designates good employers based solely on employee opinions, which are gathered through a comprehensive survey developed by the company WorkplaceDynamics. WorkplaceDynamics partners with 30 of the most prestigious publications around the country to deliver its regional top employer lists.The survey focuses on employee satisfaction in three key areas, which collectively make up an employer's "organizational health": Direction, which is about employees' being emotionally bought into what the organization is striving to achieveExecution, which is about the company's having a high performance cultureConnection, which is about employees' feeling that they are being appreciated and doing something meaningful"We are honored to once again be recognized as a top workplace by The Washington Post," said ASHA CEO Arlene Pietranton, PhD, CCC-SLP. "At ASHA, we work hard to foster a supportive and collaborative workplace that our employees are proud to be a part of—both because of how they are treated and the excellent work that they do on a daily basis to support our 182,000 members in the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology."ASHA and the other DC-area top workplace honorees were recognized at a June 18 reception and in a special supplement in the June 21 issue of The Washington Post. For more information about working at ASHA, visit www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/WorkAtASHA/. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/22/2015 12:57:50 PM6/22/2015 12:47:32 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Recognized as Top Area Workplace by The Washington Post8589935339A10330False06/22/2015 12:57:50 PM6/22/2015 12:47:32 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHA-Recognized-as-Top-Area-Workplace-by-The-Washington-Post/8589974873ContentASHA Recognized as Top Employer in Two Workplace Awards Programs/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Recognized-as-Top-Employer-in-Two-Workplace-Awards-Programs/ ASHA Recognized as Top Employer in Two Workplace Awards Programs Rockville, Md.-Based Association Honored by The Washington Post and the Alliance for Workplace Excellence Rockville MD 2017-06-16 At separate ceremonies in June, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) was honored bASHA Recognized as Top Employer in Two Workplace Awards ProgramsRockville, Md.-Based Association Honored by The Washington Post and the Alliance for Workplace Excellence RockvilleMD2017-06-16At separate ceremonies in June, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) was honored by The Washington Post and the Alliance for Workplace Excellence (AWE) as a top place of work.Last night, The Washington Post recognized 60 Washington, DC-area based organizations and companies in the mid-size employer category as part of its 2017 “Top Workplaces” program. Employers are selected entirely on the basis of employee feedback that is gathered through a survey administered by WorkplaceDynamics, LLC. Survey questions aim to assess organizational health, which encompasses three areas: (1) direction, which is about employees emotionally buying into what the organization is striving to achieve; (2) execution, meaning that the company has a high-performance culture; and (3) connection, indicating that employees feel they are being appreciated and doing something meaningful. According to the Top Workplaces program, these elements are more important to employee satisfaction than pay, benefits, and other commonly cited factors.In addition to the awards ceremony, ASHA and the other honorees will be recognized in a special Washington Post supplement.AWE also recognized ASHA at its annual awards luncheon on June 9. ASHA received honors in all four areas of the AWE program—Workplace Excellence, Health and Wellness, EcoLeadership, and Diversity—as it has every year since each individual award has been in existence.AWE award recipients undergo a rigorous assessment process led by an independent review panel. The awards recognize employers for their exemplary commitment to building excellent places to work in Montgomery County and throughout the United States.“ASHA is very proud to once again receive these tremendous accolades from The Washington Post and the Alliance for Workplace Excellence,” said Arlene Pietranton, PhD, CAE, chief executive officer of ASHA. “Our organization strives to cultivate an environment where employees can grow and succeed, all the while feeling supported, respected, and fulfilled. Not only does this help us attract and retain the finest talent, but it also helps us do the best possible work on behalf of our 191,500 members and affiliates in the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology.”For more information about employment at ASHA, visit http://www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/WorkAtASHA/. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM2/26/2018 1:18:54 PM6/16/2017 9:55:41 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Recognized as Top Employer in Two Workplace Awards Programs8589942931A10330False02/26/2018 01:18:54 PM6/16/2017 09:55:41 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Recognized-as-Top-Employer-in-Two-Workplace-Awards-Programs/8589943381ContentASHA Recognized for 15 Years of Workplace Excellence/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Recognized-for-15-Years-of-Workplace-Excellence/ASHA has been awarded the Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval by the Alliance for Workplace Excellence (AWE). ASHA Recognized for 15 Years of Workplace ExcellenceAssociation Honored in All Four Award Categories for 2014 by the Alliance for Workplace Excellence RockvilleMD2014-05-29For the 15th straight year, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has been awarded the Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval by the Alliance for Workplace Excellence (AWE). ASHA was additionally recognized with awards in the categories of diversity, eco-leadership, and health and wellness at the AWE awards ceremony in May 2014.ASHA is among a select group of just five companies or organizations that have received the Workplace Excellence award since its inception in 1999. ASHA has received each of the other three awards every year since they were introduced.AWE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping companies become great places to work."We are honored to once again be recognized as a leader in workplace excellence through the AWE awards program," said Arlene Pietranton, PhD, CAE, chief executive officer of ASHA. "As an organization, we are committed to a workplace for our employees that supports work-life balance, health and well-being, continuous learning, and diversity—all while serving as an environmentally responsible member of the community."Winners of the AWE Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval demonstrate outstanding commitment to balanced leadership and the overall success of their workforce. They are assessed in the areas of innovative corporate culture and management practices; family and employee friendly policies and programs; strong health and wellness initiatives; employee growth and learning opportunities; commitment to corporate, social, and civic responsibility; diversity and inclusion practices; flexible work environment; and safety and security.Diversity Champion Award winners are employers committed to creating a diverse and inclusive workforce. These champions recognize the value of diversity in every aspect of the workplace.EcoLeadership Award winners demonstrate commitment to environmental sustainability in the categories of waste minimization, water conservation, pollution prevention, environmentally-conscious travel, and energy efficiency. Health & Wellness Seal of Approval winners provide innovative programs for employee health and wellness that may include health risk assessments, on-site fitness facilities, educational sessions on healthy lifestyle, and other wellness programs.More information about ASHA’s work environment can be found at www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/WorkAtASHA/. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/29/2014 3:59:04 PM5/29/2014 10:05:51 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Recognized for 15 Years of Workplace Excellence8589935226A10330False05/29/2014 03:59:04 PM5/29/2014 10:05:51 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Recognized-for-15-Years-of-Workplace-Excellence/8589975500ContentASHA to Congress: Medicare Beneficiaries Need Therapy Caps to End, Improved Access to Speech-Generating Devices/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-to-Congress--Medicare-Beneficiaries-Need-Therapy-Caps-to-End,-Improved-Access-to-Speech-Generating-Devices/Permanent solutions to caps on therapy provided to Medicare beneficiaries and protecting and strengthening access to speech-generating devices (SGDs) were the focus of a statement submitted by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to a U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee today.ASHA to Congress: Medicare Beneficiaries Need Therapy Caps to End, Improved Access to Speech-Generating DevicesRockvilleMD2017-07-20Permanent solutions to caps on therapy provided to Medicare beneficiaries and protecting and strengthening access to speech-generating devices (SGDs) were the focus of a statement submitted by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to a U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee today. “Continuing discussions on the possibility of extending the current therapy cap exceptions process would be a missed opportunity to permanently resolve this perennial issue that drains time and resources on a policy provision that is opposed by the overwhelming majority of members of Congress,” said ASHA 2017 President Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP. Richard’s views were also incorporated into joint testimony offered today to the Subcommittee on behalf of ASHA, the American Physical Therapy Association, and the American Occupational Therapy Association.Over the past 2 decades, Congress has acted 16 times to avoid implementing the cap in order to prevent the devastating impact on the rehabilitation needs of Medicare beneficiaries that would result. Each instance diverted resources from the need to permanently replace the cap and steps that would improve the integrity of the Medicare program while ensuring that its beneficiaries retain access to care that they require. In addition, Richard urged Congress to removed Medicare’s capped-rental requirement on durable medical equipment—specifically, SGDs—and adopt a policy that provides ongoing and permanent access to Medicare coverage of the devices for individuals who medically qualify for the devices. In this regard, she noted an important deadline. “The Steve Gleason Act of 2015 (H.R. 2465) is expected to expire on October 1, 2018. It is imperative to make this law permanent so that individuals in need of these customized devices will continue to have access to them.” In closing, Richard stressed that ASHA looks forward to working with Congress to find permanent solutions to both the therapy caps and access to SGDs. Her complete testimony is available here [PDF]. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM7/20/2017 11:59:31 AM7/20/2017 11:58:08 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherASHA to Congress: Medicare Beneficiaries Need Therapy Caps to End, Improved Access to Speech-Generating Devices8589942931A10330False07/20/2017 11:59:31 AM7/20/2017 11:58:08 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-to-Congress--Medicare-Beneficiaries-Need-Therapy-Caps-to-End,-Improved-Access-to-Speech-Generating-Devices/8589944388ContentASHA to Stress Early Detection of Communication Disorders at AAP Meeting/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-to-Stress-Early-Detection-of-Communication-Disorders-at-AAP-Meeting/ASHA urges pediatricians to share crucial information with parents about early intervention and treatment of communication disorders.ASHA to Stress Early Detection of Communication Disorders at AAP MeetingMessage Comes on Heels of Pediatrics Study Indicating a 63% Increase in Speech Problems and 16% Rise in Hearing Problems in U.S. Children Since 2001–2002"Wait and See" Approach to Warning Signs of Communication Disorders Not Acceptable RockvilleMD2014-10-07As the nation's pediatricians gather in San Diego this week for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) annual meeting, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) will be there to share an important message of early detection of speech, language, and hearing disorders. The message will be especially timely given a recent study in AAP’s flagship journal Pediatrics, which reported a 63% increase in disability from speech disorders and a nearly 16% increase in disability from hearing disorders among U.S. children over the past decade.The Pediatrics study, Changing Trends of Childhood Disability, 2001–2011, appeared online August 18, 2014. On a broad level, it showed that the percentage of children with disabilities rose 16% between 2001 and 2011. While childhood disability due to physical conditions declined, a significant increase (21%) in disabilities due to neurodevelopmental or mental health problems was reported. The authors cited a host of potential reasons for the increase, including biologic, familial, social, and cultural factors. Improved awareness, as well as the need for specific diagnoses to receive services such as early intervention, was additionally cited. Rising cases of autism, though not identifiable from the data, may also explain some of the increase in neurodevelopmental or mental health problems, they said."Pediatricians are generally the first to discover a potential problem related to speech or hearing in a young child or to hear about concerns directly from parents," said Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2014 ASHA president. "As we learn more and more about the compelling benefits of the earliest possible intervention for these disorders, we want to remind pediatricians that it is never too soon for speech-language pathologists and audiologists to assess a child. Indirectly but clearly, the Pediatrics study underscores the need for a continued and growing partnership between pediatricians and communication professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for children who have these disorders."The message of early detection is consistent with ASHA’s ongoing Identify the Signs public education campaign (http://www.IdentifytheSigns.org), which launched in September 2013. Through public service announcements and a variety of other approaches, the campaign aims to inform parents about these disorders. By visiting the website, parents can learn the early signs, find help, and share this critical information with their friends and families."A 'wait and see' approach, which is all too common, is simply not acceptable when it comes to communication disorders in young children," said McCrea. "Parents and professionals must know that the earlier these disorders are identified, the more successful, the less expensive, and the shorter the course of treatment. We are now able to recognize disorders in younger and younger children and, through early assessment and treatment, we can often not only reverse communication disorders but also prevent them from occurring. This is transformative for a child—developmentally, academically, and socially. ASHA's more than 173,000 members are here to work with pediatricians, parents, and patients."For more information and to locate a speech-language pathologist or audiologist, visit http://www.IdentifytheSigns.org.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/10/7/2014 9:05:00 AM10/7/2014 9:05:02 AM9/15/2014 11:05:57 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA to Stress Early Detection of Communication Disorders at AAP Meeting10/7/2014 09:05:00 AM8589935226A10330False010/7/2014 09:05:02 AM9/15/2014 11:05:57 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-to-Stress-Early-Detection-of-Communication-Disorders-at-AAP-Meeting/8589976576ContentASHA Urges Congress to Take Immediate Action to Repeal Therapy Caps That Would Threaten Health of Medicare Patients Beginning January 1/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Urges-Congress-to-Take-Immediate-Action-to-Repeal-Therapy-Caps-That-Would-Threaten-Health-of-Medicare-Patients-Beginning-January-1/In a letter sent to U.S. House and Senate leaders today, ASHA and 25 other leading health and consumer organizations implored Congress to take action before the end of 2017 to prevent outpatient therapy caps that would limit treatment options for millions of Medicare beneficiaries from going in to effect.ASHA Urges Congress to Take Immediate Action to Repeal Therapy Caps That Would Threaten Health of Medicare Patients Beginning January 1Association Joins Other Leading Organizations in Calling for Permanent Solution to Arbitrary Caps That Limit Access to Necessary Rehabilitation Services for Stroke and Other ConditionsRockvilleMD2017-12-15In a letter sent to U.S. House and Senate leaders today, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and 25 other leading health and consumer organizations implored Congress to take action before the end of 2017 to prevent outpatient therapy caps that would limit treatment options for millions of Medicare beneficiaries from going in to effect.The groups, which make up the Therapy Cap Coalition, represent the concerns of Medicare beneficiaries as well as health care professionals and providers. ASHA strongly supports a full repeal of the Medicare Part B outpatient therapy caps, which restrict access to vital outpatient rehabilitative services in settings such as skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation hospitals, and clinics. For 2018, the therapy cap is $2,010 for speech-language pathology and physical therapy services combined.Under the cap, Medicare beneficiaries who suffer from speech-language disorders due to life-altering events—such as a stroke, head injury, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease—risk being denied therapy and/or being forced to pay out of pocket for services to help them regain their ability to communicate effectively. Repealing the Medicare therapy cap would ensure high-quality, medically necessary treatment and remove the uncertainty of care for both therapy providers and recipients."The health and quality of life of millions of Americans is at stake if Congress does not take immediate action to stop the therapy cap from becoming reality starting January 1," said ASHA 2017 President Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP. "For 20 years, Congress has taken temporary measures to prevent this dangerous policy from being enacted, but we are now at a critical juncture—with patients at serious risk."Bipartisan efforts in the House Ways and Means Committee, House Energy and Commerce Committee, and Senate Finance Committee have achieved a policy that would permanently end arbitrary limits on beneficiary access to necessary physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services. After 20 years, permanent repeal would ensure that beneficiary access to necessary therapy services would continue. These committees have worked with beneficiaries, health professionals, providers, and consumer advocacy groups to realize this substantial achievement.At a minimum, the Coalition asks that the House and Senate include language in the upcoming Continuing Resolution to ensure that a short-term gap of coverage does not occur until a permanent solution can be enacted.To read the full letter, click here.  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM12/18/2017 8:22:54 AM12/18/2017 8:22:51 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Urges Congress to Take Immediate Action to Repeal Therapy Caps That Would Threaten Health of Medicare Patients Beginning January 18589942931A10330False012/18/2017 08:22:54 AM12/18/2017 08:22:51 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/ASHA-Urges-Congress-to-Take-Immediate-Action-to-Repeal-Therapy-Caps-That-Would-Threaten-Health-of-Medicare-Patients-Beginning-January-1/8589943874ContentASHA Urges Public to Protect Hearing During July 4 Fireworks/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Urges-Public-to-Protect-Hearing-During-July-4-Fireworks/As the Fourth of July holiday draws near and the planning of celebrations begin, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) reminds the public of the importance of protecting one's hearing from loud noises, especially fireworks.American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Urges Public to Protect Hearing During July 4th FireworksCelebrate Safely and Plan Ahead So That Fireworks and Other Loud Noises Do Not Cause Permanent DamageRockvilleMD2014-06-30As the Fourth of July holiday draws near and the planning of celebrations begin, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) reminds the public of the importance of protecting one's hearing from loud noises, especially fireworks.Although hearing loss is often believed to be an issue that progresses over time, it can also be caused by an instantaneous loud noise. Hearing loss due to exposure to intense sounds has become more prevalent in today's society. Approximately 15% of Americans ages 20–69 have hearing loss that may have been caused by exposure to noise. Taking simple steps to protect the hearing of all family members can prevent potentially lifelong consequences."July 4th is a wonderful opportunity for revelry, but we must ensure that our hearing health does not fall prey to our desire to celebrate," said ASHA President Elizabeth McCrea. "By taking a few easy, preventive measures, all people can commemorate the holiday and safeguard their hearing health."ASHA offers these hearing protection tips this Fourth of July:Keep a safe distance. Noise from exploding fireworks can reach as high as 155 decibels, and if you are located close to the blasts, there is greater risk for immediate, sudden, and permanent hearing loss. Maintain a healthy distance (at least 500 feet) from fireworks, fire crackers, speaker systems, and other sources of loud noise.Wear earplugs. Ear plugs are an inexpensive and easy way to protect your hearing during loud events. Make sure your ear plugs fit snugly. For children under 7 or 8 years old, use ear muffs.Know your limits. Sounds at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss. The louder the sound, the shorter the time period before hearing loss can occur. Various phone applications can measure sound, but a good rule of thumb is to avoid noises that are "too loud" and "too close" or that last "too long." If you notice ringing or buzzing in your ears, move farther away from the noise source.Seek professional help. If you feel that your hearing may have been affected, seek the help of a certified audiologist. Find a professional in your area at www.asha.org/profind/.For more information on noise-induced hearing loss, visit www.asha.org/public/hearing/Hearing-Loss/.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM9/14/2015 11:37:52 AM6/30/2014 1:45:37 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherASHA Urges Public to Protect Hearing During July 4 Fireworks8589935226A10330False09/14/2015 11:37:52 AM6/30/2014 01:45:37 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Urges-Public-to-Protect-Hearing-During-July-4-Fireworks/8589943483ContentASHA Wins Bronze Anvil Award of Commendation/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Wins-Bronze-Anvil-Award-of-Commendation/ASHA has received a 2014 Bronze Anvil Award of Commendation from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) for superior performance in the design and execution of an individual public relations tactic within a broader public relations campaign.ASHA Wins Bronze Anvil Award of Commendation From Public Relations Society of AmericaAssociation Recognized for Identify the Signs Campaign PSAsRockvilleMD2014-06-04The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has received a 2014 Bronze Anvil Award of Commendation from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) for superior performance in the design and execution of an individual public relations tactic within a broader public relations campaign.ASHA earned the 2014 award in the Public Service Announcements (PSA) category for the video PSAs of its Identify the Signs public education campaign (http://IdentifytheSigns.org).Developed in collaboration with Home Front Communications, Washington, DC, the PSAs are a leading tactic in ASHA's effort to educate the public about the warning signs of communication disorders. The spots have proven popular with broadcast stations nationwide, ranking among the top 20% of PSAs in number of airings in 2013.The Bronze Anvil Awards were created by PRSA in 1969 to recognize outstanding public relations tactics—the individual items or components that contribute to the success of an overall program or campaign. Of the 734 applicants to the awards program this year, only 90 received commendation awards."We are honored to receive this prestigious award from PRSA," said ASHA 2014 President Elizabeth S. McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP. "It is an indication that we are making strides in the important task of getting the word out about persons with communication disorders and the professionals who serve them."According to Joe Cohen, APR, PRSA 2014 chair, "It is with great honor that we award ASHA with PRSA's Bronze Anvil Award of Commendation in recognition of tactical expertise in public relations. This award recognizes PR professionals that have raised the bar for tactical expertise in the profession and have delivered significant value to the organizations they represent."About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/4/2014 10:47:23 AM6/4/2014 10:32:47 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHA Wins Bronze Anvil Award of Commendation8589935226A10330False06/4/2014 10:47:23 AM6/4/2014 10:32:47 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/ASHA-Wins-Bronze-Anvil-Award-of-Commendation/8589945614ContentASHAs Arlene Pietranton Named Professional Society CEO of the Year/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHAs-Arlene-Pietranton-Named-Professional-Society-CEO-of-the-Year/CEO Update names ASHA's Arlene Pietranton Professional Society CEO of the Year.ASHA's Arlene Pietranton Named Professional Society CEO of the Year by CEO UpdateAssociation Leadership Award Winners Selected by Cross-Section of Association CommunityRockvilleMD2015-04-03ASHA represents 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. As CEO, Pietranton leads a staff of more than 280 individuals.ASHA CEO since January 2004, Pietranton has overseen a time of tremendous success and growth for the organization. Major association accomplishments have included adopting a new vision statement, Making effective communication, a human right, accessible and achievable for all; completing a new, energy-efficient and environmentally friendly Gold-LEED certified home for its national office in December 2007; restructuring ASHA's governance model, which had been in place since 1969; growing its members and affiliates from just over 114,000 in 1994 to 182,000 today; introducing a slew of new programs and services for members; significantly increasing its international presence; and launching a series of award-winning public education campaigns, among many others.Pietranton is also a leader in the broader association community. Currently, she serves as immediate past chair of the ASAE Board of Directors. In addition, she serves as a member of various committees of state and national professional and civic organizations.Prior to being ASHA CEO, Pietranton served as ASHA's chief staff officer for speech-language pathology and as ASHA's director of health services. Before joining ASHA, Pietranton worked at the George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, DC, where she held several clinical and administrative positions, including director of speech-language pathology and audiology services, director of rehabilitation services, and administrative director of the Neurological Institute.Her award will be presented at a CEO Update ceremony at the JW Marriott in Washington, DC, in September 2015. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM4/14/2015 10:47:25 AM4/3/2015 6:42:52 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHAs Arlene Pietranton Named Professional Society CEO of the Year8589935339A10330False04/14/2015 10:47:25 AM4/3/2015 06:42:52 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHAs-Arlene-Pietranton-Named-Professional-Society-CEO-of-the-Year/8589967990ContentASHFoundation Awards/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHFoundation-Awards/The American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (ASHFoundation) recently awarded $526,000 through research grants, scholarships, and clinical achievement awards to 77 individuals. ASHFoundation Awards $526,000 to 77 IndividualsRockvilleMD2015-12-21The American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (ASHFoundation) recently awarded $526,000 through research grants, scholarships, and clinical achievement awards to 77 individuals. The awards support research in communication sciences and disorders, leading to advances in treatment; nurture the next generation of students in the discipline; and lead to innovation in science and practice.The exceptionally innovative and talented recipients were recognized and awarded at the annual ASHFoundation Founders Breakfast at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's 2015 Annual Conference. More than 300 donors, corporate sponsors, and past awardees were in attendance to honor the award winners."Our gifted researchers and practitioners work every day to help people communicate better," ASHFoundation President Alex F. Johnson said during the annual Founders Breakfast. "Over 50 million Americans have a speech, language, hearing, or swallowing disorder, and the individuals whom we celebrate bring bold, forward-thinking solutions for these patients and for the clinicians who serve them. It's a special privilege for the ASHFoundation to honor such passionate and promising innovators."To learn about all of the individuals who were honored as part of the ASHFoundation's funding and recognition programs, visit www.ashfoundation.org.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing FoundationThe ASHFoundation's mission is to advance knowledge about the causes and treatment of hearing, speech, and language problems. The ASHFoundation raises funds from individuals, corporations, and organizations to support research, graduate education, and special projects that foster discovery and innovation in the discipline of communication sciences.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM12/21/2015 11:35:25 AM12/21/2015 11:35:23 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHFoundation Awards8589935339A10330False012/21/2015 11:35:25 AM12/21/2015 11:35:23 AMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/ASHFoundation-Awards/8589972867ContentASHFoundation Awards $740,000 to 68 Individuals/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHFoundation-Awards-$740,000-to-68-Individuals/ASHA Foundation awards given to 68 individualsASHFoundation Awards $740,000 to 68 IndividualsRockvilleMD2016-12-21The American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (ASHFoundation) recently awarded $740,000 in research grants, scholarships, and clinical achievement awards to 68 individuals. The awards support research in communication sciences and disorders, leading to advances in treatment; nurture the next generation of students in the discipline; and lead to innovation in science and practice. The exceptionally innovative and talented recipients were recognized and awarded at the annual ASHFoundation Founders Breakfast at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) 2016 Convention. Nearly 400 donors, corporate sponsors, and past awardees attended to honor these worthy recipients. ASHFoundation President Thomas F. Campbell noted, "The ASHFoundation's special 70th anniversary year marks the fact that more than 2,000 students and professionals have received almost $9 million in ASHFoundation funding to explore bold ideas and discover new breakthroughs to improve the lives of people striving to communicate. We celebrate the work of gifted researchers, practitioners, and aspiring students. These individuals are passionate and promising innovators who work every day to help people communicate better."  To learn about all the individuals who were honored as part of the ASHFoundation’s funding and recognition programs, visit the ASHFoundation at www.ashfoundation.org.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (ASHFoundation)The ASHFoundation supports innovators and sparks innovation in the communication sciences by advancing knowledge about the causes and treatment of hearing, speech, language, and swallowing disorders. The ASHFoundation raises funds from individuals, corporations, and organizations to support research, graduate education, and special projects that foster discovery and innovation in the discipline of communication sciences.   About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM12/29/2016 2:12:15 AM12/22/2016 6:30:03 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonASHFoundation Awards $740,000 to 68 Individuals8589942122A10330False012/29/2016 02:12:15 AM12/22/2016 06:30:03 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/ASHFoundation-Awards-$740,000-to-68-Individuals/8589945697ContentAutism Awareness Month Dental Care Tips/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Autism-Awareness-Month-Dental-Care-Tips/Tips for dental care for children with autism.Autism Awareness Month: Dental Care Tips for Children With Autism Spectrum DisorderRockvilleMD2015-04-21Among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder, almost half describe their child’s dental health as fair or poor, according to a study in the journal Pediatric Dentistry. This is not surprising, as a visit to the dentist can present many challenges for a child with autism. The sensory overload from the strange smells, loud noises, and sharp tools; the unfamiliarity of the masked adult looming; and the unpredictability of the whole process—not knowing what will happen and when it will end—are just some of the factors that make this a particularly difficult scenario for a child with autism.This Autism Awareness Month, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) tapped Terese Conrad, MA, CCC-SLP, a speech-language pathologist who specializes in working with clients with autism spectrum disorder and a former dental hygienist, to provide tips for parents and caregivers for successively navigating a trip to the dentist. Conrad, who works at Wichita State University, offers the following.At HomeBy the time some children with autism first see the dentist, they have already developed serious dental problems that may even require hospitalization. Try to start good dental hygiene habits early.Tooth-Brushing TipsVocabulary: Many children need repeated exposures to learn the vocabulary. This vocabulary is a building block for following the directions necessary to become more independent with home care and visiting the dentist. Teach children the names of the items (e.g., toothbrush, toothpaste, cup, water, sink, towel) along with the body parts (e.g., teeth, tongue, mouth). Reinforce this vocabulary throughout the day. Read developmentally appropriate books outside of the bathroom routine; post photographs outlining the steps in the bathroom; and explore cartoons and short video clips that review the process.Diet: Individuals with autism may have limited diets and strong likes or dislikes when it comes to food/drink. Do your best to provide a diet that reduces the risk of cavities.Limit sugary drinks, sticky/gummy foods (e.g., raisins, fruit snacks), and acidic foods that can break down the enamel. Napping or going to bed with a bottle or sippy cup containing juice or milk can lead to liquid pooling in the mouth, bathing the teeth. Try diluting juice with water, slowly increasing the water over time.If you are dealing with a child with a diet that might lead to dental health issues, attempt to brush his/her teeth before bedtime to remove the plaque and bacteria.Talk with your dentist regarding fluoride and options for delivery (e.g., toothpaste, rinses, drops).Routine: Children consistently do better with a clear set of expectations. Consider the following.Begin the bedtime routine before everyone is exhausted. A half hour before bed, take a bath, dress for bed, brush teeth, and read a book. Create a visual schedule to follow.Clearly outline tooth brushing. Some families use visual timers to indicate when they are done brushing. Some use music similar to the hand-washing songs or battery-operated toothbrushes that signal the end of the process (e.g., the vibration ends after 2 minutes). For older or more independent individuals, a diagram of the mouth outlining the tongue side, tops, and cheek sides of the teeth is helpful, with a plan for moving from one section of the mouth to the next.Extras: These tips apply to any child to develop a positive approach to dental care.Avoid unclear endings. Try not to use expressions like, “We’re almost done,” or “1 more minute.” These don’t provide predicable information.Consider starting with the toothbrush only. A soft bristle toothbrush is recommended. Be aware of the potential to elicit a gag—more likely for individuals who breathe through their mouths.Expect that you may have to explore several options before finding a toothpaste flavor that the child tolerates.Consider introducing toothpaste at the end as a reinforcer, especially if the child consistently tries to eat the toothpaste (i.e., sucking the toothbrush and refusing to participate in the brushing process). Many kids will go through a phase where they chew on the toothbrush. Introducing it without paste may help you determine if the child needs to learn to hold the mouth open for the brush. Can he or she follow the directive to hold the mouth open?Store toothpaste out of reach when you have a child who might consume more than the pea size amount recommended.Try a different location for tooth brushing (such as the kitchen sink), having the child assist with getting the toothbrush from the bathroom and returning it, if possible.Some families find that letting the child have the toothbrush while seated in the bathtub is the best way to develop a positive connection. Watch out for soapy water on the brush.Taking turns brushing each other’s teeth promotes acceptance (i.e., the child takes mom’s brush and puts it in mom’s mouth and mom brushes the child’s teeth). Stick to a clear start and finish.Create structure for safety and skill development. Wandering around with a toothbrush can be dangerous.Dental VisitsMany parents who have experienced difficulty with doctor appointments put off a dental visit for as long as possible. Here are a few tips for establishing a positive experience:Choose a dentist: Check with other professionals or parents in your area for dentists they recommend for children with autism and why. Parents may be given recommendations of dentists who perform work under anesthesia only. This may be an appropriate referral, but is not a great starting place if the goal is to develop a routine for “happy visits.”Ask questions: Call the office with a list of questions to learn more about how they support/provide services to children with autism. Plan ahead: Behavioral psychologists frequently assist families with activities/events that are problematic for children and families. The behavior modification strategy is called Planned Activity Training. The goal is to plan ahead and establish a step-by-step plan, including reinforcement, to create a positive routine/successful completion. Outline the steps of the dental visit (e.g., check-in, waiting room, meeting the staff, transitioning to the operatory).Plan for success: Some children might need to start with walking into the office, greeting the front desk staff, and leaving—receiving reinforcement, such as a sticker, immediately.Visual supports: Pictures outlining the process provide an outline/schedule, letting a child know what to expect and when it is over.Sensory supports: Some families use headphones to reduce the noise or sunglasses, as the child sits in the chair, to reduce the light.Strive to start with “happy visits.” Some dentists will even do the first visual exam without taking them back to the dental chair, right in the waiting room. Videotaping: A dentist may allow you to walk through the office, taping the office and staff to share with your child. This would provide a non-threatening way to see the office without contact with the smells and transitions.Some families find it helpful to let their children watch them get their teeth checked, going through the steps of a simple exam.Regardless of the strategy, remember that the goal is to establish a positive outcome. Make the process as predictable as possible.To learn more about a Wichita State University program that helps children with autism navigate dental visits, go to http://blog.asha.org/2015/04/21/helping-children-with-autism-successfully-navigate-a-trip-to-the-dentist. Additional resources may be found on ASHA’s website at www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/Autism/. Autism Speaks provides a dental toolkit that offers helpful information at https://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/dental-tool-kit. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM4/27/2015 11:55:03 AM4/21/2015 11:55:14 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherAutism Awareness Month Dental Care Tips8589935339A10330False04/27/2015 11:55:03 AM4/21/2015 11:55:14 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Autism-Awareness-Month-Dental-Care-Tips/8589969593ContentCAA Receives Renewal from Department of Education/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/CAA-Receives-Renewal-from-Department-of-Education/The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) recently received the maximum 5-year renewal of recognition from the U.S. Department of Education (ED).Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Receives Renewal from Department of EducationRockvilleMD2016-04-06The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) recently received the maximum 5-year renewal of recognition from the U.S. Department of Education (ED).The ED recognition enables CAA-accredited programs to establish eligibility to participate in certain federal programs authorized under the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA), Section III, and the U.S. Public Health Service Act.The renewal reaffirms that the CAA, a semiautonomous body within the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), operates in compliance with the Higher Education Act and accepted best practices within the accrediting community.The CAA is the only accrediting body for programs in audiology and speech-language pathology that is recognized by both the ED and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).As of February 2016, 248 master's programs in speech-language pathology and 73 clinical doctoral programs in audiology were CAA-accredited. Another 20 new programs—two in audiology and 18 in speech-language pathology—held candidate (or pre-accreditation) status."ASHA's accreditation program has been recognized by ED since 1967," ASHA 2016 President Jaynee Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A, says. "In fact, its long history dates as far back as the early 1960s when the first accreditation standards were developed."Handelsman adds: "Through the CAA's work, we continue to help ensure that academic programs graduate students who are fully prepared to provide effective professional services as audiologists and speech-language pathologists."According to CAA Chair Mikael D. Z. Kimelman, PhD, CCC-SLP, the "ED's recognition process provides the CAA with an opportunity for self-evaluation of our accreditation program and processes.""An important part of our self-study comes from peer review and dialogue with stakeholders in the higher education community," Kimelman explains. "Our accreditation program is strengthened by the ED's rigorous review process, which makes it valuable to us and the programs we serve." About the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language PathologyThe CAA formulates standards for the accreditation of graduate education programs that provide entry-level professional preparation in audiology and/or speech-language pathology; evaluates programs that voluntarily apply for accreditation; grants certificates and recognizes those programs deemed to have fulfilled requirements for accreditation; maintains a registry of holders of such certificates; and prepares and furnishes to appropriate persons and agencies lists of accredited programs. Although it is part of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the CAA operates autonomously when it carries out its accreditation tasks.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM4/6/2016 2:17:13 PM4/6/2016 2:16:52 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonCAA Receives Renewal from Department of Education8589942122A10330False04/6/2016 02:17:13 PM4/6/2016 02:16:52 PMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/CAA-Receives-Renewal-from-Department-of-Education/8589970794ContentCelebrate Safely This Fourth of July/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Celebrate-Safely-This-Fourth-of-July/ASHA recommends a few simple steps to help prevent any potential hearing damage that can result from the July 4th holiday festivities.Celebrate Safely This Fourth of July: Three Tips for Protecting Your HearingRockvilleMD2016-06-29As Americans gear up for the long Independence Day weekend, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association recommends a few simple steps to help prevent any potential hearing damage that can result from all the revelry—which can stay around long after the holiday is over. With the traditional festivities involving fireworks, firecrackers, and concerts, the Fourth of July is one of the noisiest American holidays.Noise from fireworks register 150 decibels, more than a jackhammer (130 decibels), jet plane takeoff (120 decibels), and chainsaw (100 decibels).Sounds louder than 85 decibels can cause permanent hearing loss, so celebrate safely with these simple tips:Keep a safe distance. Stay at least 500 feet from fireworks, firecrackers, speakers, and other sources of loud noise.Wear earplugs. These are an inexpensive and easy way to protect your hearing. Use earmuffs for young children.Know your limits. Avoid noises that are "too loud" and "too close" or that last "too long."If you ever have any concerns about your hearing, including pain or ringing in the ear, seek an evaluation from a certified audiologist. A list of professionals by local area is available at www.asha.org/profind.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org.View all ASHA press releases at www.asha.org/about/news.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/29/2016 11:37:23 AM6/29/2016 11:36:52 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonCelebrate Safely This Fourth of July8589942122A10330False06/29/2016 11:37:23 AM6/29/2016 11:36:52 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Celebrate-Safely-This-Fourth-of-July/8589977209ContentCES 2018 Attendees Say Industry Needs to Be More Outspoken About Technology Overuse/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/CES-2018-Attendees-Say-Industry-Needs-to-Be-More-Outspoken-About-Technology-Overuse/ASHA released the results of a survey it conducted of nearly 200 attendees at the 2018 International CES earlier this month that show 88% think it is important that more prominent industry figures speak out about tech overuse.CES 2018 Attendees Say Industry Needs to Be More Outspoken About Technology OveruseThose Who Work in Tech Industry Vigilant About Their Own and Their Children's Use of Devices, According to ASHA SurveyRockvilleMD2018-01-30As Apple shareholders, former Facebook executives, and other prominent voices in the technology industry sound alarms about overuse of popular technology, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) today released the results of a survey it conducted of nearly 200 attendees at the 2018 International CES earlier this month. The ASHA survey results show 88% think it is important that more prominent industry figures speak out about tech overuse.The survey respondents work in the tech industry and appear to be strict about their own and their children's tech use. Almost 67% said children should not be allowed to have their own personal tech devices until age 10 or older—this amid a societal environment where new tablets, smartwatches, and other devices are being heavily promoted for even the youngest children. Almost a third (30%) said children shouldn't even use devices until age 10 or older. "One of the most fascinating aspects of these results is that the very people who work to design and market these products seem to be very concerned about the effects of this technology—and perhaps more dedicated to managing their own and their families' usage than the rest of us," said Elise Davis-McFarland, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2018 ASHA President. "Among our concerns as communication experts is the potential impact on speech/language development in young children," Dr. Davis-McFarland continued. "It's not the technology itself, but how it is being used and what it is taking away from when it's being used. If used interactively with parents, and it is not detracting from time children spend talking, reading, and interacting with loved ones, it isn't necessarily problematic. But when it's supplanting these critical opportunities for verbal interaction, which is how young children learn to communicate, that is worrisome. We also need to be mindful of hearing loss in children who are listening to devices at too-loud volumes, particularly with earbuds or headphones."Of those CES respondents who are parents themselves (roughly half), 72% said they have prohibited technology at the dinner table, social events, or similar gatherings, and 68% have set limits for how much time their children can use their devices. There's also strong interest in doing more, including employing apps or other tools to help manage their kids' tech use (70% said they are interested) and establishing tech-free areas of their house, such as the family room or bedroom (61% said they are interested). When it comes to their own tech use, 86% of the CES attendees surveyed by ASHA said they would attend a venue, restaurant, or social gathering where personal device usage is prohibited. One quarter said they employ features, apps, or devices to help manage the time they spend on devices. Among parents, 55% said the biggest barrier to managing their children's tech use is their own busy schedule, which makes it difficult to monitor usage and/or assist in keeping kids occupied. That may be why so few (8%) say they "always" use tech interactively with their kids. Nevertheless, a large majority of all respondents see that the most realistic solution to preventing kids' overuse is parental/household parameters (68%).View the full survey results [PDF]. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM2/1/2018 3:53:57 PM1/30/2018 11:35:34 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonCES 2018 Attendees Say Industry Needs to Be More Outspoken About Technology Overuse8589943539A10330False02/1/2018 03:53:57 PM1/30/2018 11:35:34 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/CES-2018-Attendees-Say-Industry-Needs-to-Be-More-Outspoken-About-Technology-Overuse/8589976930ContentElise Davis-McFarland Becomes 2018 President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/Elise-Davis-McFarland-Becomes-2018-President-of-the-American-Speech-Language-Hearing-Association/Elise Davis-McFarland, PhD, CCC-SLP, took office this month as the 2018 President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).Elise Davis-McFarland Becomes 2018 President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationRockvilleMD2018-01-08Elise Davis-McFarland, PhD, CCC-SLP, took office this month as the 2018 President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).A resident of Charleston, South Carolina, Dr. Davis-McFarland has spent her career in a variety of higher education roles, from teaching and program development to leadership of speech-language pathology programs, research, and executive-level college administration. "I am honored to become ASHA's President," Dr. Davis-McFarland said. "I look forward to advancing and supporting ASHA’s work across the board in areas like its public policy agenda as well as efforts to develop an interstate licensure compact; develop and implement credentialing programs for audiology and speech-language pathology assistants; further inter-professional education and practice in the human communication professions; and, collaborate with international colleagues to further the development and delivery of audiology and speech-language pathology programs and services worldwide."During her 1-year term as ASHA's President, Dr. Davis-McFarland will represent nearly 200,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students.Dr. Davis-McFarland comes to the ASHA Presidency from an extensive and diverse professional background. She began her career as a school speech-language pathologist in North Carolina. After first completing an audiology internship at the Veterans Administration and Duke Hospitals in Durham, North Carolina, then graduate study at the University of Virginia and University of Pittsburgh, she joined the University of Houston faculty. She held subsequent positions as Vice President of Governmental Affairs for the Charleston Chamber of Commerce (Charleston, South Carolina) and Director of Institutional Research at The Citadel. In addition, Dr. Davis-McFarland served as a commissioner for South Carolina’s Medicaid program. At the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), she developed and headed the interdisciplinary graduate Communication Sciences and Disorders program. That assignment led to a teaching award and her research at the MUSC hospital. Subsequently, Dr. Davis-McFarland became Vice President for Student Affairs at Trident College, where she provided executive-level leadership. She went on to receive a Rotary Faculty Fellowship to teach speech-language pathology at the Medical University of Southern Africa.Dr. Davis-McFarland's years as an ASHA volunteer leader span many different roles. They encompass service on committees focused on Practice Guidelines for Speech-Language Pathologists, Ethics, Multicultural Issues, and Honors. Additionally, Dr. Davis-McFarland has been a member of ASHA's Ad Hoc Committee for Technical Support to the Ministry of Health of Guyana and assisted in the development of a communication sciences and disorders curriculum and program for the University of Guyana. Along with being a reviewer for Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, her research and publication areas include speech and language development in infants and children with HIV-AIDS, multicultural issues in language assessment, literacy development, and pediatric dysphagia.   About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.orgView all ASHA press releases at www.asha.org/about/news.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/11/2018 6:57:26 AM1/8/2018 12:56:34 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonElise Davis-McFarland Becomes 2018 President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association8589943539A10330False01/11/2018 06:57:26 AM1/8/2018 12:56:34 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/Elise-Davis-McFarland-Becomes-2018-President-of-the-American-Speech-Language-Hearing-Association/8589941967ContentElizabeth McCrea Begins Term as 2014 ASHA President/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Elizabeth-McCrea-Begins-Term-as-2014-ASHA-President/Elizabeth S. McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, took office as the 2014 president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association on January 1.Elizabeth McCrea Begins Term as 2014 ASHA PresidentRockvilleMD2014-01-02Elizabeth S. McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, took office as the 2014 president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association on January 1.Dr. McCrea is a clinical professor emerita of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University. She retired from the university in 2011, where she was both a didactic and clinical educator. Dr. McCrea was also director of the department's R. L. Milisen Speech and Hearing Center for almost a decade. Prior to joining the faculty, she was a pediatric speech-language pathologist working in both school-based and hospital settings. Currently, she continues her work in clinical education in support of the externship program of NOVA Southeastern University."As 2014 president, I will strive to help our members think of ASHA as their professional home and a thriving community from which they will benefit by actively engaging," says Dr. McCrea. "With the Board of Directors, I also want to continue to focus on best understanding the dynamic changes that are taking place in service-delivery settings, which ultimately influence how we educate students, how our members practice, and how now—more than ever—we must collaborate with colleagues, both in and out of the discipline, to achieve best outcomes for our patients and clients. This will help ASHA serve our members in ways that will be most helpful to them as they navigate the current environments in both health care and education."An active researcher, Dr. McCrea was the principal investigator for a $326,000 4-year Personnel Preparation Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, which centered on developing leadership personnel in clinical education. She is co-author of the book, The Supervisory Process in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.Dr. McCrea has held multiple volunteer roles within ASHA. She served on both the Legislative and Advisory Councils. She has been a member of Special Interest Group 11, Administration and Supervision since its inception, serving as its coordinator for two terms. Dr. McCrea previously was vice president for academic affairs on ASHA's Board of Directors (2007–2009) and is currently a member of the Financial Planning Board. She is also an ASHA Fellow.Dr. McCrea succeeds 2013 ASHA President Patricia A. Prelock, PhD, CCC-SLP, who will continue to serve on the Board of Directors as a member and immediate past president. Dr. McCrea holds the master's degree from the University of Virginia and the PhD from Indiana University.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 166,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/4/2014 6:21:22 AM1/2/2014 11:44:37 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonElizabeth McCrea Begins Term as 2014 ASHA President8589935226A10330False01/4/2014 06:21:22 AM1/2/2014 11:44:37 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Elizabeth-McCrea-Begins-Term-as-2014-ASHA-President/8589970100ContentExperts Concerned Tech Habits May Threaten Speech Language and Hearing/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Experts-Concerned-Tech-Habits-May-Threaten-Speech-Language-and-Hearing/New polling finds informing parents and teens of risks associated with tech overuse prompts willingness to engage in safer usage.Health Experts Concerned Tech Habits May Threaten Speech, Language & Hearing as Communication 'Time Bomb' LoomsNew Polling Finds Informing Parents and Teens of Risks Associated With Tech Overuse Prompts Willingness to Engage in Safer UsageRockvilleMD2016-05-03Recent studies have underscored the overuse of technology in U.S. households. Speech and hearing experts from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) who were recently polled warn that current tech habits, if left unchecked, could produce a "time bomb" that manifests in the form of diminished communication abilities and skills. This "time bomb" encompasses speech and language development, which is dependent on adequate time for verbal exchange such as listening, talking, reading, and interacting with parents—interactions that technology cannot duplicate—and hearing loss, which impedes communication, academic and social success.New polling from ASHA finds that informing parents and teens of the potential risks that overuse of personal technology devices poses to speech and language development as well as to hearing health prompts an overwhelming willingness to change usage habits.The polling, conducted in recognition of Better Hearing & Speech Month, found that once informed of communication health risks—the potential for impaired speech and language development and the ability to hear, for example—more than 79% of parents said that they are willing to set stronger usage parameters at home and 90% are more likely to change their own personal tech device habits to be a better tech role model for their families. Millennial parents, in particular, are willing to change their habits. The polling found 46% of millennial parents say they are much more likely to implement stronger guidelines around technology use in their household—only 22% of older parents say the same."The strong interest in adopting safer behaviors is a refreshing and hopeful sign," ASHA 2016 President Jaynee Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A, says. "It suggests that despite our society's dependence on technology, parents and teens are willing to change their habits in meaningful ways once they learn that overuse comes with risks. It's encouraging that millennial parents, who have grown up in the digital age, according to our polling show the most willingness to change."Eighty-four percent of teens said that they are more likely to keep the volume down on devices; 74% are inclined to use their devices less when they are around their parents and family; and 69% are so inclined when they are around their friends.The polling was conducted by Greenberg, Quinlan, Rosner Research, which surveyed 500 parents of children ages 0–19 from March 17 to 21 and 500 teens ages 13–19 from March 21 to March 24.The polling shows that both parents and teens, on average, each use tech not only more than 5 hours daily but also when communication abilities and skills are typically developed, including conversations between parents and children as well as family dinners and leisure activities.Majorities of parents at least sometimes check their phones at the dinner table (50%) and use a device during leisure time with their children (67%). Additionally, 55% of teens reported having no rules limiting tech usage in their homes (although parents disagree: more than two-thirds of parents report implementing at least general guidelines on their children's use of technology).The polling also indicates that teens and parents have come to depend on using these devices to solve boredom, get time to themselves, and even communicate with one another rather than talking face to face. For example, more than half of teens (52%) reported often or sometimes using texting or instant messaging to communicate with parents when inside the home.ASHA experts are urging parents and teens to adopt a new "Digital Diet" to help moderate tech use in favor of more conversation and human interaction. Tips include creating a family technology plan, keeping a log, or sponsoring tech-free nights and events. "We encourage parents to consult the Digital Diet we have developed for guidance making safer tech usage a reality at home," Handelsman says. "The steps involved are simple and easy, but they can make a big difference preserving and protecting communication health."Handelsman notes that the Digital Diet can help build on another bright spot from the polling: 93% of teens whose parents have set tech usage rules at home considered rules fair. Similarly, 96% of parents who have set usage rules said that they were successful.ASHA encourages the public to visit www.asha.org/ProFind to find a certified audiologist and speech-language pathologist in their local area if they have communication health concerns.Detailed polling results are available at www.asha.org/bhsm. View a multimedia version of this press release. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM8/29/2016 2:23:58 PM5/4/2016 11:50:33 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherExperts Concerned Tech Habits May Threaten Speech Language and Hearing8589942122A10330False08/29/2016 02:23:58 PM5/4/2016 11:50:33 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Experts-Concerned-Tech-Habits-May-Threaten-Speech-Language-and-Hearing/8589974401ContentGail Richard Statement on OTC Hearing Aid Act/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Gail-Richard-Statement-on-OTC-Hearing-Aid-Act/Congress is holding a hearing about the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 (H.R. 1652), a bill that would provide public access to over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. Statement by Gail Richard, President, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association On the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 (H.R. 1652)RockvilleMD2017-05-02"Today, Congress is scheduled to hold a hearing that will cover the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 (H.R. 1652), a bill making its way through the U.S. House of Representatives that would provide public access to over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids.As drafted, the measure is meant for persons with 'perceived mild to moderate hearing loss.' However, the only aids that should be made available over-the-counter should be those that are useful to persons with mild hearing loss. To do otherwise would put the public at risk. Greater degrees of hearing loss are serious medical conditions with broader health implications. As such, they demand individualized treatment and counseling by an audiologist. Yet, under H.R. 1652, people who experience a hearing loss other than mild could take the misguided step of trying to seek relief via OTC solutions. Some could unwittingly damage their hearing further by over-amplifying; others could do the opposite—under-amplify and grow frustrated by the failure to experience relief, resulting in the conclusion that their situation is hopeless and give up seeking additional professional help. If H.R. 1652 becomes law as it is drafted, the public's hearing health will have been significantly compromised. No data exists that supports making OTC hearing aids widely accessible. A much safer, more responsible path for lawmakers would be to restrict the gain and output of OTC hearing aids, thus making them useful only for persons with mild hearing loss. It would also be in the public's best interest if Congress required the Food and Drug Administration to track the safety and user satisfaction issues that arise. That way they could better assess the implications of a do-it-yourself model for hearing health care."For a comprehensive analysis of H.R.1652, see http://www.asha.org/uploadedFiles/ASHA-Statement-OTC-Hearing-Aids.pdf [PDF].  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/2/2017 11:08:52 AM5/2/2017 11:08:51 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonGail Richard Statement on OTC Hearing Aid Act8589942931A10330False05/2/2017 11:08:52 AM5/2/2017 11:08:51 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Gail-Richard-Statement-on-OTC-Hearing-Aid-Act/8589946809ContentHouse Passes Bill That Would Enhance Medicare Beneficiaries Access to Speech-Generating Devices/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/House-Passes-Bill-That-Would-Enhance-Medicare-Beneficiaries-Access-to-Speech-Generating-Devices/Late this afternoon, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Steve Gleason Act of 2015, a measure that allows for the immediate purchase and transfer of ownership for speech-generating devices (SGDs) to the Medicare beneficiary and removes SGDs from Medicare capped-rental requirements. House Passes Bill That Would Enhance Medicare Beneficiaries' Access to Speech-Generating DevicesASHA Coordinated Advocacy That Helped Bring Measure To A House Vote Bill Is Now Set To Become LawRockvilleMD2015-07-15Late this afternoon, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Steve Gleason Act of 2015, a measure that allows for the immediate purchase and transfer of ownership for speech-generating devices (SGDs) to the Medicare beneficiary and removes SGDs from Medicare capped-rental requirements. Introduced by U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), the bill ensures coverage of eye-tracking technology that allows individuals with extremely limited voluntary muscle control to effectively use SGDs to communicate their personal and health care needs.SGDs currently fall under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service (CMS) capped-rental requirements, an arrangement that adversely impacts patients who use them during extended hospital stays or in skilled nursing facilities. CMS has maintained that the capped-rental issue must be addressed through legislation.Speech-generating devices are highly customized electronic augmentative and alternative communication systems that are used to supplement or replace speech. The Steve Gleason Act will ensure that Medicare beneficiaries who utilize these devices to communicate can retain their customized devices when requiring inpatient care.The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) advocated strongly for the legislation, working closely with lawmakers and allied organizations alike. At one point, ASHA coordinated the development of a letter calling for the bill’s passage that garnered signatories from more than 40 key groups."We wholeheartedly support the Steve Gleason Act and are proud and pleased to be working together with legislators like U.S. Rep McMorris Rodgers and Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) and allied organizations to have it become law," ASHA President Judith Page PhD, CCC-SLP, observed. "Communication is a human right and this legislation will help make that right a reality for many Medicare beneficiaries."This past April, the Senate passed the Steve Gleason Act, championed by Sen. David Vitter (R-LA). Now that the measure has passed the House, it will go to President Obama for signature into law. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM7/16/2015 11:53:42 AM7/16/2015 11:53:40 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonHouse Passes Bill That Would Enhance Medicare Beneficiaries Access to Speech-Generating Devices8589935339A10330False07/16/2015 11:53:42 AM7/16/2015 11:53:40 AMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/House-Passes-Bill-That-Would-Enhance-Medicare-Beneficiaries-Access-to-Speech-Generating-Devices/8589968185ContentJaynee Handelsman Takes Office as 2016 ASHA President/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Jaynee-Handelsman-Takes-Office-as-2016-ASHA-President/Jaynee A. Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A, director of pediatric audiology in the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery in the University of Michigan Health System, began her term as president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) on January 1.Jaynee A. Handelsman Takes Office as 2016 President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)RockvilleMD2016-01-06Jaynee A. Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A, director of pediatric audiology in the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery in the University of Michigan Health System, began her term as president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) on January 1. Dr. Handelsman’s primary clinical, teaching, and research areas of focus include the assessment and management of patients with dizziness and balance disorders as well as the impact of potentially ototoxic medications on auditory and vestibular system function. She is also involved in the identification and management of hearing loss and vestibular function loss in infants and young children as well as in professional ethics and conflicts of interest. “I am honored to serve as the 2016 president of ASHA and look forward to a productive year advancing the professional interests of our member audiologists and speech-language pathologists,” said Dr. Handelsman. “With dramatic changes occurring in both health care and education, the skills and expertise of our 182,000 members and affiliates are more valuable than ever. Among my priorities are promoting greater recognition of the essential role of the professions—and encouraging all members to tap into their leadership potential as these changes occur.” Dr. Handelsman is an ASHA Fellow. A longtime ASHA volunteer, her previous roles in the association include serving as the audiology co-chair for the 2014 ASHA Convention, serving on the Board of Directors as the vice president for professional practice in audiology (2010–2012), and being a member of the Board of Ethics, the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (chair in 2009), and the Professional Services Board.Additionally, Dr. Handelsman served as a site visitor for the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, was a member of the Preferred Practice Patterns for Audiology Workgroup, and was an Audiology Subject Matter Expert (SME) Panel member. She was a Steering Committee member for Special Interest Group 6, Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, and is currently a member of the Scientific and Professional Education Board. Dr. Handelsman received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and her master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Kansas. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM9/27/2016 12:40:58 PM1/6/2016 2:04:49 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherJaynee Handelsman Takes Office as 2016 ASHA President8589942122A10330False09/27/2016 12:40:58 PM1/6/2016 02:04:49 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Jaynee-Handelsman-Takes-Office-as-2016-ASHA-President/8589944873ContentJudith Page Begins Term as 2015 ASHA President/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Judith-Page-Begins-Term-as-2015-ASHA-President/Judith Page's term as 2015 ASHA president begins.Judith Page Begins Term as 2015 ASHA PresidentRockvilleMD2015-01-05 Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, associate professor in the Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky, assumed office as the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA) 2015 President on January 1. Dr. Page served as program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky for 17 years and as chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences for 10 years.Prior to joining the university, Dr. Page provided evaluations and intervention in a public school setting, where she specialized in services to children with developmental disabilities. Her focus areas include research methods, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and language intervention strategies for individuals with complex communication needs. "I am honored to hold the position of ASHA president," says Dr. Page. "During my term I plan to continue ASHA's efforts to help speech-language pathologists and audiologists successfully influence or respond to the tremendous changes we are seeing in both health care and education—changes that impact how we care for individuals with communication disorders."An influential and active member of the ASHA community, Dr. Page has been a member of both the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (chair, 2009) and the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (chair, 2012–2013) as an ASHA fellow. She has also held multiple leadership posts in the Kentucky Speech-Language-Hearing Association, including president, newsletter editor, Honors Committee chair, and director of governmental affairs. Dr. Page also served as chair of the Kentucky Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and recording secretary for the Council of State Association Presidents.In addition to holding these leadership posts, Dr. Page has published on a variety of topics, including AAC, story grammar, children with developmental disabilities, treatment paradigms, and interprofessional education.Dr. Page succeeds Elizabeth S. McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2014 ASHA President, who will continue to serve on the Board of Directors as a member and immediate past president.Dr. Page holds a master's degree from the University of Illinois and a PhD from Purdue University. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/5/2015 7:00:00 AM1/5/2015 7:00:11 AM12/29/2014 11:39:18 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonJudith Page Begins Term as 2015 ASHA President1/5/2015 07:00:00 AM8589935339A10330False01/5/2015 07:00:11 AM12/29/2014 11:39:18 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Judith-Page-Begins-Term-as-2015-ASHA-President/8589976353ContentLatest Research and Clinical Approaches to be Presented at ASHA 2017 Convention/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Latest-Research-and-Clinical-Approaches-to-be-Presented-at-ASHA-2017-Convention/Thousands of the nation's audiologists and speech-language pathologists will convene in Los Angeles November 9–11, 2017, to explore cutting-edge research, technologies, and treatment advances and techniques in the discipline of communication sciences and disorders at ASHA's annual convention.Latest Research and Clinical Approaches in Autism, Bilingualism, Cochlear Implants, Concussion, Screen Technology and Communication Development, and More To Be Presented at ASHA 2017 ConventionLargest Annual Gathering of Nation's Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Will Occur in Los Angeles November 9–11, 2017RockvilleMD2017-11-06As communication disorders remain among the most common conditions that Americans young and old experience, thousands of the nation's audiologists and speech-language pathologists will convene in Los Angeles November 9–11, 2017, to explore cutting-edge research, technologies, and treatment advances and techniques in the discipline of communication sciences and disorders at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).Among the areas of attention are the expanding candidate pool for cochlear implants, the effects of screen-based technology on communication and social development in children, the efficacy of a controversial treatment practice for nonverbal individuals with autism, new evidence surrounding cognitive advantages of bilingual people, and much more. Below are a few of the sessions that will occur at the 3-day conference:The Effects of Electronic Versus Print Books on the Language Outcomes of Early Readers—As tablets and other screen-based technology become increasingly popular among young children, this systematic review aims to answer the question, "Among emerging readers, does the use of electronic or print books yield stronger language outcomes?" Although no significant overall differences were found, studies that looked at specific areas of language often favored either print or electronic books. Print book reading was shown to have a greater benefit for word recognition and overall comprehension, whereas e-book reading had a greater benefit for letter knowledge and phonological awareness. The authors concluded that both mediums should be used with children learning to read. They also suggest that parents, educators, and clinicians use these results when considering the point of the reading session or an area of weakness—for example, if a child needs to work on comprehension, a print book may be the better choice.Rapid Prompting Method: Does This New Emperor Have Any Clothes?—Rapid Prompting Method (RPM) is a practice that involves a facilitator holding and moving a letter board while an individual with autism moves their own hand to spell out words. It is intended to give nonverbal individuals the ability to communicate. This first systematic review of RPM was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the technique for communication skills, communication-related cognitive skills, and other areas. This is timely work, as RPM is becoming increasingly popular. Although the developer of RPM claims that the method results in extraordinary improvements in speech, language, and other communication abilities for people with autism, a review of multiple literature databases did not yield any studies that qualified for inclusion in this systematic review. The authors conclude there is no compelling or even suggestive empirical evidence that RPM delivers on claims of communication or educational benefits. They further state that RPM bears many similarities to Facilitated Communication (FC), a long discredited and harmful treatment practice that violates human rights and that has led to many wrongful allegations of sexual abuse. The lack of evidence of any clinical benefit, combined with FC similarities, leads the authors to recommend against its use. They note that parents, family members, and teachers should seek evidence-based treatment methods, which include existing high- and low-tech assistive devices for people who are nonverbal that do not require a facilitator. The authors also state that, as part of their code of ethics, clinicians must follow evidence-based practices.A Glimpse Into the Vocal Demands of the Voiceover Artist—The landscape for voiceover artists is changing rapidly due to many factors. These include extensive vocal demands in the gaming world and recent complaints to the SAG-AFTRA union to make medical and wellness vocal care an area of attention for members. Two highly regarded voice actors will join speech-language pathologist Edie Hapner to discuss the extent of vocal demands across jobs in commercial, gaming, or audiobooks; the vocal hazards inherent in the job; and clinical advice for protecting one's voice while working in this industry and for treating voiceover professionals. Spectrum Shield: ASD Safety With Law Enforcement—Today, the first wave of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who received years of speech, behavioral, and occupational therapy are graduating high school and entering adulthood. Many are attending college, driving, and becoming independent. Some challenges may follow, including in interactions with law enforcement. There have been a number of high-profile news stories of problematic encounters. Given the unique social and linguistic needs of individuals with ASD, this seminar will present a training program designed to ensure the safety of people with autism when dealing with law enforcement in their communities. The focus is on teaching the verbal and nonverbal aspects of communication needed to keep one safe followed by simulated police encounters such as traffic stops and pat downs. Speech-language pathologist and presenter Pamela Wiley created this program with actress Holly Robinson Peete and former NFL quarterback Rodney Peete as part of their HollyRod Foundation.Telepractice Versus Face-to-Face Service Delivery Models Using a Phonemic Awareness Intervention With Head Start Preschoolers—Telepractice is a treatment model where services are delivered at a distance using technology. Its use is still not common, despite significant need in some rural and other areas of the United States where shortages of speech-language pathologists exist. This study investigated whether telepractice is effective as compared to face-to-face treatment in a sample of Head Start preschoolers for phonemic awareness intervention. Phonemic awareness is the ability to manipulate language into individual sounds, count syllables, and recognize rhyming words—and is critical for literacy and academic success. The study showed that the sample of Head Start preschoolers, a historically underserved population, benefited from phonemic awareness intervention provided via telepractice. According to the authors, parents should know that speech-language therapy provided via telepractice is effective. They may consider (a) asking their school principals to consider this as a solution in areas where there are shortages of speech-language pathologists or (b) seeking out telepractice clinicians on their own. The Effects of Screen Technology Exposure on Executive Functioning and Social Skills of Children—This study investigated the effects of screen exposure on the executive functioning and social skills of children ages 9–11. Executive functioning is a key skill that allows children to perform and successfully complete tasks, which includes the ability to pay attention, manage emotions, multitask, and organize and plan. Although past studies have looked at the relationship between social skills and use of screen technology, this study is unique in that it also looks at executive function. The authors found that screen technology negatively impacts both social performance and executive function. Based on their results, they recommend that parents limit the use of screen technology in children—particularly at times when children should be observing and participating in social interactions, such as family gatherings and at dinner. Impact of Subconcussive Hits on Symptoms, Cognition, and Balance in Collegiate Football Players—This study examines the cumulative effects of repetitive, subconcussive impacts on collegiate football players. The researchers describe the number of impacts sustained by 15 NCAA Division 1 football players during a 15-session spring practice. The study also looks at both acute (24-hour, 28-hour, 1-week) and short-term (pre- and post-season) effects of subconcussive impacts on a variety of domains, including symptoms, cognition, balance, and reaction time. This is the first comprehensive attempt to look at acute and short-term effects across domains among the same player set. The researchers found that exposure to subconcussive head impacts across the course of a spring practice season was related to acute and short-term changes in the number and severity of reported symptoms (e.g., headache, fatigue, and drowsiness) as well as to short-term changes in cognition. The evidence provided support for a full season study. If findings are consistent in the full season study, it will call for new efforts to better protect student athletes by minimizing exposure to head impacts—for example, through modification of drills. Bilingualism and Cognition: Duration of Active L2 Use Impacts Cognitive Performance—This session presents original research examining cognitive processing in monolingual and bilingual French- and English-speaking adults ages 18–80, specifically investigating the Bilingual Cognitive Advantage (BCA) hypothesis. This hypothesis holds that bilingual people have certain cognitive advantages over monolingual people. The study found that there are cognitive processing differences that result from being bilingual. In the analysis of the data, longer active use of a second language was found to mitigate age-related cognitive declines among bilinguals. The findings contribute to the debate surrounding the BCA hypothesis and provide objective data supporting new insights on how the bilingual language experience affects cognitive processing. Future research is needed to further explore the neuroprotective implications of being bilingual.Grand Rounds: Cochlear Implants—No Longer Just for the Profoundly Deaf—Advances in electrode arrays and surgical procedures have led to the increased likelihood of hearing preservation with cochlear implants. This has led to expansion of candidacy for traditional patients, greater consideration of patients for hybrid/electroacoustic devices, and greater consideration of off-label use of devices, such as patients with single-sided deafness. This session will explore state-of-the art test procedures and factors that are considered when determining cochlear implant candidacy for children and adults.Note for media: If you are interested in attending any of these sessions, or interviewing any authors, please contact Francine Pierson at 301-296-8715 or fpierson@asha.org. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM11/7/2017 11:20:57 AM11/6/2017 12:51:24 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonLatest Research and Clinical Approaches to be Presented at ASHA 2017 Convention8589942931A10330False011/7/2017 11:20:57 AM11/6/2017 12:51:24 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Latest-Research-and-Clinical-Approaches-to-be-Presented-at-ASHA-2017-Convention/8589972465ContentLatest Research, Treatment Options and Controversies in Communication Disorders To Be Explored at 2016 ASHA Convention/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Latest-Research,-Treatment-Options-and-Controversies-in-Communication-Disorders-To-Be-Explored-at-2016-ASHA-Convention/A rich mix of leading topics in communication will all be explored at the 2016 ASHA Convention.Latest Research, Treatment Options and Controversies in Communication Disorders To Be Explored at 2016 ASHA Convention Technology and Communication Development, Vocal Fry, Affordable Hearing Loss Treatment, and More on the Agenda for Philadelphia MeetingRockvilleMD2016-11-14A rich mix of leading topics in communication—including the potential effects of popular technology use on young children's development; listeners' perceptions of people who speak using vocal fry; the impact of a stutter on a person's employment status and compensation; the viability of using less expensive personal sound amplification products (PSAPs) in place of hearing aids; and more—will all be explored at the 2016 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention, November 17–19, 2016, in PhiladelphiaThe premier annual event for audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students, this year's conference will bring together more than 14,000 attendees under the theme, "Everyday leadership. Leadership every day." The extensive program will feature 6,000 authors contributing their expertise across 24 topic areas.Among the new features are a series of old-fashioned debates on topics that have generated controversy in the professions, including whether a child-directed approach or a clinician-directed approach is better for teaching children with autism to speak; whether clinicians are overmodifying diets in dysphagia patients to manage risk of aspiration and if such decisions are then putting patients at risk for other complications; and the opposing cases for earlier versus later intervention for stuttering. In what is likely to be a lively discussion, panelists will explore different views on the use of PSAPs for affordable treatment of age-related hearing loss, including the evidence comparing outcomes from PSAPs versus those from hearing aids.Other sessions of interest include the following:Toddlers & Technology: Taming the Monster—This workshop will review the recent data on the prevalence of technology in early childhood and will discuss interactions between technology use and child development. The presenters will discuss the controversies regarding limiting screen time and the current status of expert recommendations regarding appropriate use of technology. Experts will discuss effective strategies to encourage healthy social interactions and facilitate language development for all children, including those with disabilities.Who Framed Babytalk? Seven-Month-Old Infants Benefit From Maternal Repetition—The importance of talking to young children to encourage their language development is well-established, but understanding of specific mechanisms continues to grow. In this study, researchers found that it is constructive for mothers to use repetition in speaking to young children, reusing not only words but also phrases with infants in conversation. This maternal repetition appears to benefit children when they are in the beginning (versus later) stages of learning language. The study yields important information for parents and caregivers about how they can contribute to language enrichment in children as young as 7 months of age. Stuttering & Labor Market Outcomes: Quantifying the Impact & Accounting for Causes—In the first quantitative study of adult labor market outcomes in the United States for people who stutter, researchers found (a) that those who stutter are more likely to be unemployed than those who do not stutter and (b) that a statistically significant pay gap exists for males. Individuals who stutter are also more likely to have received public assistance. Although some differences may be attributed to education level, the authors propose that workplace discrimination and self-stigma are also contributors to lower wages earned by people who stutter. Authors used longitudinal data of more than 5,000 individuals to look at several nuanced labor market outcomes in reaching their conclusions.The Influence of Uptalk & Vocal Fry on Perceptions of the Speaker—Much has been made of the vocal qualities of uptalk and especially vocal fry in young women's voices, but this research uniquely quantifies and compares listener perceptions of uptalk and vocal fry in both male and female voices. The authors found that voices with uptalk and vocal fry were linked to perceptions of lower confidence and lower intelligence and were also considered to be more annoying than a normal voice. This was true in the cases of both male and female listeners. This may have employment and other consequences, and long-term use of vocal fry may also be an unhealthy vocal behavior, authors note.  Verbal & Nonverbal Outcomes of Toddlers With Early Language Delays, Global Developmental Delays & ASD—Building on previous research conducted by the First Words Project—which seeks to improve screening tools and early detection of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other communication disorders—this study aimed to characterize early social communication skills of children with and without ASD, as well as children with ASD and co-occurring global developmental delays and/or language delays (both common in those with ASD). The study found notable similarities and differences in the early social communication milestones, such as expression of emotions, use of eye gaze, gestures, and language comprehension, among the six groups included in the study. This collection of skills can be observed and measured months before words emerge and was found to be a strong predictor of later language skills and nonverbal cognitive ability. By improving understanding of social communication milestones in these groups, earlier detection and more targeted interventions may be possible during the toddler years, when the plasticity of the young brain maximizes impact. Auditory/Vestibular/TBI Micro-Series: Effects of TBI on Auditory Processing, Vestibular Function, and Tinnitus—There has been heightened awareness of the auditory and vestibular side effects of concussion (which can include auditory processing, tinnitus, and vestibular dysfunction) based on current military conflicts as well as increased media attention on sports-related concussions. However, research is still needed (a) to understand the relationships and prevalence of these conditions in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and (b) to employ better management strategies for these patients. This session will present new data and offer treatment recommendations for this population.Note: Any media interested in attending an ASHA session or speaking to researchers may contact Francine Pierson at fpierson@asha.org or 301-613-7303.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM11/14/2016 6:12:52 PM11/14/2016 6:12:52 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonLatest Research, Treatment Options and Controversies in Communication Disorders To Be Explored at 2016 ASHA Convention8589942122A10330False011/14/2016 06:12:52 PM11/14/2016 06:12:52 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Latest-Research,-Treatment-Options-and-Controversies-in-Communication-Disorders-To-Be-Explored-at-2016-ASHA-Convention/8589945251ContentLegislation to Increase Medicare Beneficiaries Access to Audiology Services/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Legislation-to-Increase-Medicare-Beneficiaries-Access-to-Audiology-Services/The Medicare Audiology Services Enhancement Act of 2015 (HR 1116) would provide Medicare beneficiaries greater access to audiology services and would increase opportunities for audiologists to treat their patients. ASHA Applauds Proposed Legislation to Increase Medicare Beneficiaries' Access to Audiology ServicesMedicare Audiology Services Enhancement Act of 2015 Introduced by Representative Bilirakis RockvilleMD2015-02-27The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) lauds the introduction of the Medicare Audiology Services Enhancement Act of 2015 (HR 1116) this week. The bill would provide Medicare beneficiaries greater access to audiology services and would increase opportunities for audiologists to treat their patients.Introduced February 26 by U.S. Representative Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) and co-sponsored by Representative G.K. Butterfield (D-NC), the proposed legislation would give Medicare beneficiaries access to audiologists for both diagnostic and treatment services similar to those already available from other practitioners. The bill aligns audiologists with the managed-care direction of healthcare and, at the same time, has a negligible impact on costs to the healthcare system. This is critical for its ability to pass within the current regulatory and legislative environment."This bill would grant Medicare patients coverage for the full range of professional services provided by audiologists," said ASHA President Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP. "ASHA has been tirelessly working to expand access to audiology services available under Medicare, and we applaud Congressman Bilirakis for his leadership."HR 1116 would allow audiologists to bill for hearing and balance assessment services, auditory treatment services (including auditory processing and auditory rehabilitation treatment), vestibular treatment and intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. Also, the proposed legislation would provide Medicare coverage of comprehensive audiology services in coordination with current billing and reimbursement standards, consistent with other non-physician services covered by Medicare.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/View all ASHA press releases at www.asha.org/about/news.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM3/2/2015 11:05:54 AM3/2/2015 11:05:53 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonLegislation to Increase Medicare Beneficiaries Access to Audiology Services8589935339A10330False03/2/2015 11:05:54 AM3/2/2015 11:05:53 AMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Legislation-to-Increase-Medicare-Beneficiaries-Access-to-Audiology-Services/8589942005ContentListen To Your Buds Campaign at 2014 CES/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Listen-To-Your-Buds-Campaign-at-2014-CES/ASHA's Listen To Your Buds safe listening campaign is again participating in the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas."Listen To Your Buds" Urges Consumer Electronics Show Attendees to Adopt Safe Listening Habits to Prevent Childhood Hearing LossRockvilleMD2014-01-06Amid the fever-pitch buzz surrounding the newest, most innovative technologies on display at the 2014 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, the award-winning Listen To Your Buds campaign of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is spreading an important health message that all parents and kids need to hear. As iPads, Kindle Fires, and other tablets; smart phones; and similar technologies become near-ubiquitous, toddlers to teens are at risk for untimely, irreversible hearing loss.Noise-induced hearing loss is completely preventable. Unfortunately, hearing loss is growing more common in younger and younger segments of America's population. At the same time, personal audio technology use in on the rise—in even the smallest of children. Consider the following:75% of kids ages 8 and under have access to a smart mobile device at home, up from 52% in 2011. Almost 40% of children under 2 have used a mobile device, up from 10% 2 years ago.One in six adolescents has high-frequency hearing loss, which is typically noise related and preventable.Despite this, more than 96% of parents believe their child is either not at risk or only slightly at risk of developing hearing problems from excessive noise. Almost 70% have not spoken with their child about noise exposure, mainly because of perceived low risk.Since 2006, the Listen To Your Buds campaign has educated the public about the risk of hearing loss in children from unsafe use of personal audio technology, particularly ear buds or headphones. The Buds have spread their message at the Consumer Electronics Show since 2008. Consumer Electronics Association is a partner in the campaign.The Buds want all kids to enjoy their technology, but to do so safely. It couldn't be easier with these simple steps:Keep the Volume Down. A good guide is half volume.Limit Listening Time. Give your hearing "quiet breaks."Talk to Your Kids. Discuss and model safe listening habits.In addition to practicing preventative safe listening habits, parents need to learn the early signs of hearing loss in kids. These are not always easy to spot, and many parents are not looking for them. Early detection of hearing loss in children is critical, as hearing problems that are left untreated can result in academic, social, and other difficulties. For more information about early signs and treatment options, visit ASHA's new early detection initiative, Identify the Signs, at http://identifythesigns.org/. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 166,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/8/2014 10:08:57 AM1/6/2014 6:41:57 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonListen To Your Buds Campaign at 2014 CES8589935226A10330False01/8/2014 10:08:57 AM1/6/2014 06:41:57 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Listen-To-Your-Buds-Campaign-at-2014-CES/8589944255ContentLSVT Global Becomes Newest ASHA Corporate Partner/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/LSVT-Global-Becomes-Newest-ASHA-Corporate-Partner/ LSVT Global Becomes Newest ASHA Corporate Partner Relationship Will Boost Member Access to Evidence Based Resources Rockville MD 2014-08-25 The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) announced today that LSVT Global, Inc. , which specializes in treatments for the speech communicationLSVT Global Becomes Newest ASHA Corporate PartnerRelationship Will Boost Member Access to Evidence Based ResourcesRockvilleMD2014-08-25The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) announced today that LSVT Global, Inc., which specializes in treatments for the speech communication and physical and occupational therapy needs of persons with Parkinson disease and other conditions, has become an ASHA Corporate Partner. “We are pleased to welcome LSVT Global to our Corporate Partnership program,” ASHA President Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, said. Association members will be able to benefit almost immediately from this new relationship through LSVT Global’s sponsorship of an ASHA online conference, Neurodegenerative Disorders: Maximizing Patient Outcomes, scheduled for September. “In addition to the online conference scheduled for September, through this new Partnership, we look forward to new educational opportunities and products becoming more accessible to ASHA members,” President McCrea said. “LSVT Global has a long-standing association with ASHA, and we are proud to join the ranks of its Corporate Partners,” said LSVT Vice President and Co-Founder David H. McFarland. “We look forward to working with its members to provide them with evidence-based clinical training and products that can enhance and inform their very important work.” About LSVT Global LSVT Global, Inc. offers evidence-based and effective treatments that meet the speech communication (LSVT LOUD®) and physical/occupational therapy (LSVT BIG®) needs of persons with Parkinson disease and other conditions, including stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and Down syndrome. Its innovative technology (LSVT Companion®) facilitates the clinical impact of these treatment protocols, which thousands of clinicians worldwide are trained and certified to deliver. The mission of LSVT Global is to provide unlimited access to proven treatments for all who can benefit. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM8/25/2014 10:03:51 AM8/25/2014 10:03:49 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMSaraMischoLSVT Global Becomes Newest ASHA Corporate Partner8589935226A10330False08/25/2014 10:03:51 AM8/25/2014 10:03:49 AMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/LSVT-Global-Becomes-Newest-ASHA-Corporate-Partner/8589942828ContentMay Is Better Hearing and Speech Month/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/May-Is-Better-Hearing-and-Speech-Month/During May 2014 Better Hearing and Speech Month ASHA will provide new public education resources about communication disorders.May Is Better Hearing and Speech Month: ASHA to Launch New Public Education Resources About Communication Disorders and Benefits of Early InterventionRockvilleMD2014-05-01During May Is Better Hearing and Speech Month (BHSM), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) will release new resources from the Identify the Signs campaign to educate the public about the early signs of communication disorders and how early detection can help. View a multimedia version of this press release.This year's BHSM theme is "Communication Disorders Are Treatable," and the awareness effort will highlight four topics, including newborn hearing screening and follow-up, noise-induced hearing loss in children, communication issues related to autism, and language and literacy. Among the new resources from the Identify the Signs campaign:An online panel of experts from ASHA, Easter Seals, and the Department of Education will discuss communication disorders and their treatment via Google+ Hangout on May 6 from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. EDT. RSVP for the live event. A Twitter party hosted by parenting blogger Michele McGraw (@scrappinmichele) on May 20 from noon to 1:00 p.m. EDT. ASHA experts will be on hand to discuss early detection of speech and hearing disorders in children. No registration is required; those interested in joining can follow the hashtag #BHSMChat at that time. A new infographic illustrating the prevalence and cost of communication disorders, which can be viewed at http://identifythesigns.org/the-facts/. Four topical podcasts related to the weekly BHSM themes, which can be accessed at http://podcast.asha.org/. Week 1: Newborn Hearing Screening—Patti Martin, PhD, CCC-A, director of audiology and speech pathology, Arkansas Children's HospitalWeek 2: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children—Jessica Rossi-Katz, PhD, CCC-A, associate professor of speech, language, hearing sciences, Metropolitan State University of DenverWeek 3: Autism Diagnosis and Treatment—Patricia Prelock, PhD, CCC-SLP, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of VermontWeek 4: Building Language and Literacy Skills During the Summer—Lyndsey Zurawski, MS, CCC-SLP, speech-language pathologist, Palm Beach County, Florida school districtASHA encourages the public to sign the Universal Declaration of Communication Rights to help bring attention to people with communication disorders and the professional care that can help them.For further information about the early warning signs of communication disorders and where to go for help, visit IdentifyTheSigns.org.  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists, speech, language, and hearing scientists, audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel, and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/2/2014 11:19:43 AM5/1/2014 6:41:02 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonMay Is Better Hearing and Speech Month8589935226A10330False05/2/2014 11:19:43 AM5/1/2014 06:41:02 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/May-Is-Better-Hearing-and-Speech-Month/8589945754ContentMay Is Better Hearing and Speech Month/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/May-Is-Better-Hearing-and-Speech-Month/ASHA will introduce a multifaceted public education effort about communication and technology during May's Better Hearing and Speech Month.May Is Better Hearing & Speech Month: ASHA to Lead Extensive Consumer Outreach Effort Focused on Technology and CommunicationTraditional/Digital Tools Will Educate Public About Importance of Human Communication in the Tech Age and Early Identification of Speech/Language and Hearing DisordersRockvilleMD2015-04-28During May Is Better Hearing & Speech Month (BHSM), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) will engage in a multifaceted public education effort on the importance of human communication and safe listening, as personal technology, such as smartphones and tablets, become increasingly popular among children.Through a variety of outreach tactics and resources, ASHA will also raise awareness about communication disorders and the critical need for early treatment by certified speech-language pathologists and audiologists.Activities planned for this May include:Listen To Your Buds Concert—ASHA's award-winning Buds campaign will bring a fun and interactive Safe Listening Concert to the FBR Branch of the Boys & Girls Clubs in the nation's Capital. Children will learn how to enjoy personal audio technology safely and protect their hearing for a lifetime—a critical message, given a new warning from the World Health Organization that 1.1 billion young people are at risk for noise-induced hearing loss from leisure activities, such as misuse of personal audio technology. The event will feature musician and Parents Choice award-winner Billy Jonas.National Survey of Parents on Child Tech Use & Media Outreach—Results of a new ASHA-commissioned survey of U.S. parents of children ages 0–8 about their kids' use of technology and concerns about its impact on communication development, academics, behavior, and other areas will be released. A national media tour announcing the findings is scheduled for May 8. This will be supported by ongoing media outreach planned for the entire month of May—including digital news outlets, national and local op-ed placement efforts, and participation of ASHA member spokespeople in local TV and radio interviews around the country. Speaking Up for Communication Social Campaign—A grassroots digital campaign will offer ASHA members an easy and effective way to become BHSM ambassadors. Through Speaking Up for Communication, ASHA members can sign up to receive various digital resources to easily share with their social networks. The resources will help inform the public in easy and accessible ways.New Identify the Signs Materials—New resources associated with ASHA's Identify the Signs public education campaign will be released—including a new video and other digital assets. Launched in September 2013, the award-winning campaign educates the public about the early signs of communication disorders and the tremendous value of early intervention. The bilingual, award-winning campaign has already achieved more than 347 million audience impressions. Twitter Party—A Twitter Party hosted by parenting blogger and author of Raising Digital Families For Dummies Amy Lupold Bair (@ResourcefulMom) will connect ASHA experts with a large network of parents. Planned for May 19 at noon EDT, it will serve as an opportunity to educate parents about communication disorders, as well as share tips about safe listening and maximizing opportunities for communication in the age of technology. To participate, follow the hashtag #BHSMchat during the party hour and watch @Resourcefulmom for conversational questions.Share Your Stories Initiative—BHSM will mark the launch of a new Share Your Stories initiative for ASHA members. This effort seeks to highlight the special connections between ASHA professionals and patients that improve the quality of life of many every day. ASHA members with a story to share should e-mail a 1- to 3-paragraph summary, along with a daytime contact information, to pr@asha.org. The most inspiring stories about treating communication disorders that are received will be featured online, pitched to media, and honored at ASHA's Convention.Additional ASHA Member Resources—In addition to social media assets, various member resources, such as a 2015 BHSM poster, coloring page, and bookmark—as well as press release and media advisory templates—are available to help members recognize and publicize BHSM in their communities. These are available at www.asha.org/bhsm.More information about all of these activities will be available at www.asha.org/bhsm. Questions may be directed to bhsm@asha.org. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM4/28/2015 1:45:10 PM4/28/2015 10:45:54 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonMay Is Better Hearing and Speech Month8589935339A10330False04/28/2015 01:45:10 PM4/28/2015 10:45:54 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/May-Is-Better-Hearing-and-Speech-Month/8589945551ContentMedicare SGR Bill Leaves Beneficiary Access Issue Behind/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Medicare-SGR-Bill-Leaves-Beneficiary-Access-Issue-Behind/With more than one million Medicare beneficiaries at risk for being denied necessary outpatient therapy services, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) are asking Congress to include a permanent repeal of the therapy cap in new legislation introduced last week to fix the flawed sustainable growth rate (SGR).Medicare SGR Bill Leaves Beneficiary Access Issue BehindPermanent Repeal of Therapy Cap Excluded in New Legislation Addressing Flawed Provider Reimbursement Under Medicare: More than One Million Medicare Beneficiaries at RiskRockvilleMD2015-03-24With more than one million Medicare beneficiaries at risk for being denied necessary outpatient therapy services, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) are asking Congress to include a permanent repeal of the therapy cap in new legislation introduced last week to fix the flawed sustainable growth rate (SGR). SGR is the calculation used for reimbursement of providers for outpatient Medicare services.The Medicare therapy cap and SGR were created when Congress passed the Balanced Budget Act in 1997. The current proposal to repeal the SGR only includes a two-year patch for the therapy cap—a risky approach for Medicare beneficiaries. Without being attached to a larger Medicare reform bill, there is no guarantee Congress will take up the therapy cap issue in two years."We need a full repeal of the existing caps on physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services. These annual financial caps limit services often needed after a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or spinal cord injury, or to effectively manage conditions such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and arthritis. Arbitrary caps on these vital Medicare outpatient therapy services are simply unacceptable," said Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), a member of the Finance Health Care Subcommittee. "Permanent repeal of these therapy caps should be addressed as part of any legislative proposal to repeal and replace SGR.""I am concerned that the current, arbitrary caps could prevent Medicare beneficiaries recovering from diseases or conditions that require extensive therapy from receiving the services they need," said Senator Susan M. Collins (R-ME), chairman of the Senate Aging Committee. "It is vital that we ensure patients aren't denied access to care because of arbitrary caps under Medicare as part of the SGR package." Permanent repeal of the Medicare therapy cap in SGR legislation has already been negotiated and supported by both parties. Approved in the Senate's version of permanent SGR legislation in the last Congress, the alternative policy would create a more targeted approach to treatment outliers—and would focus on therapy outcomes in reimbursement decisions. This is consistent with the revised approach to SGR, which is tied to quality outcomes as opposed to the traditional fee-for-service model."It is vital that Congress advances a permanent solution to the therapy cap issue so that Medicare beneficiaries have access to necessary treatment they require and deserve," said ASHA 2015 President Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP. "We have delayed decisive action for far too long. By addressing the therapy cap in current legislation, we can eliminate uncertainty and act in the best interests of patients and providers.""If Congress fails to include a permanent solution for the therapy cap in this bill, it will have purposely missed the only significant opportunity in almost 20 years to fix this critical patient issue," said APTA President Paul Rockar, Jr, PT, DPT, MS. "A bipartisan solution has been negotiated. These policies were created together. They should be fixed together." "Providing certainty in payment through SGR reform without also permanently addressing the therapy cap issue undermines access to care for Medicare beneficiaries seeking much-needed therapies to maintain their quality of life," said Virginia Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA, AOTA president. "Any effort to disassociate these two policies will, undoubtedly, compromise Congress' ability to tackle the policy comprehensively in the future."About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.orgAbout the American Physical Therapy AssociationThe American Physical Therapy Association represents more than 90,000 physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy nationwide. Learn more about the types of conditions physical therapists can treat, and find a physical therapist in your area, by visiting www.MoveForwardPT.com. Follow Move Forward PT on Twitter and Facebook.Founded in 1917, the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) represents the professional interests and concerns of more than 185,000 occupational therapists, assistants, and students nationwide. The Association educates the public and advances the profession of occupational therapy by providing resources, setting professional and educational standards, and serving as an advocate to improve health care. Based in Bethesda, Md., AOTA's major programs and activities are directed toward promoting the professional development of its members and assuring consumer access to quality services so patients can maximize their individual potential. For more information, go to www.aota.org.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM3/24/2015 3:41:53 PM3/24/2015 3:41:48 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonMedicare SGR Bill Leaves Beneficiary Access Issue Behind8589935339A10330False03/24/2015 03:41:53 PM3/24/2015 03:41:48 PMUndefined/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Medicare-SGR-Bill-Leaves-Beneficiary-Access-Issue-Behind/8589947108ContentNew ASHA Campaign Focuses on Certificate of Clinical Competence/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/New-ASHA-Campaign-Focuses-on-Certificate-of-Clinical-Competence/ASHA introduces a new campaign focused on the Certificate of Clinical Competence.New American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Campaign Focuses on ASHA Certificate of Clinical CompetenceRigorous Standards of Credential Spotlighted Campaign Ads Feature ASHA-Certified MembersRockvilleMD2015-09-15The 60-year-old Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is the focus of a new ASHA campaign (www.ashacertified.org).The national effort features ads with ASHA-certified members from various work settings and locales. The ads have already begun appearing in professional outlets—the opening promotion of what is envisioned as a multiyear effort. Other campaign tactics include direct mail and social media outreach, as well as an ongoing exhibit program.The campaign is aimed at those who refer to, hire, supervise, and evaluate the more than 150,000 ASHA member audiologists and speech-language pathologists who are ASHA certified. People in these positions have a bearing on the public's access to "our members with the CCCs," according to ASHA 2015 President Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP."With the aging of the population and a rise in communication-related disability in the young, the public need for quality care for communication disorders is only increasing," Dr. Page says. She notes that quality is built into the CCC credential. "It reflects the holder's commitment to meeting and maintaining the highest professional standards."To hold the CCC, audiologists and speech-language pathologists must have at least a doctoral or master's degree, respectively, from an accredited academic program, pass a national exam, and engage in 30 contact hours of continuing education every 3 years."We are proud of the care ASHA-certified members provide every day—care that makes a positive difference in the quality of people's lives," Dr. Page adds. "ASHA is committed to promoting quality care through its new campaign."About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM9/15/2015 6:29:02 PM9/15/2015 1:25:14 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonNew ASHA Campaign Focuses on Certificate of Clinical Competence8589935339A10330False09/15/2015 06:29:02 PM9/15/2015 01:25:14 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/New-ASHA-Campaign-Focuses-on-Certificate-of-Clinical-Competence/8589945803ContentNew ASHA Survey of US Parents Significant Percentages Report That Very Young Children Are Using Technology/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/New-ASHA-Survey-of-US-Parents-Significant-Percentages-Report-That-Very-Young-Children-Are-Using-Technology/A new ASHA survey of parents in the U.S. reports the use of technology by very young children.New ASHA Survey of U.S. Parents: Significant Percentages Report That Very Young Children Are Using Technology Usage Is Occurring When Human Interaction Is Key To Developing Strong Communication SkillsRockvilleMD2015-05-08A new survey of U.S. parents commissioned by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) finds significant percentages reporting technology use by very young children and more than half of the parents surveyed have concerns about the potential negative impact of technology use on the ability of the young to communicate.Conducted this past March, the survey [PDF] polled 1,000 parents of children ages 0–8. Its release today occurs during Better Hearing & Speech Month, a national observance that raises awareness of speech, language, and hearing disorders—and spotlights the importance of communication health.Sixty-eight percent of surveyed parents' 2-year-olds use tablets. Meanwhile, 59% use smartphones, and 44% use video game consoles.Such results raise questions about the course of the development of the very young's capacities to communicate, according to Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2015 ASHA president. "The most rapid period of brain development takes place before age 3," Dr. Page notes. "The primary way young children learn is through verbal communication that technology simply cannot duplicate."She adds: "Indeed, despite advances in technology, it remains critical that children have sufficient opportunities to develop their vocabulary and communication skills by listening, talking, reading, and interacting with their parents and others, for which there is no substitute."Survey respondents say technology holds positive promise. However, majorities express concern about how its misuse can harm communication health.55% have some degree of concern that misuse of technology may be harming their children's hearing; with respect to speech and language skills, the figure is 52%.52% say they are concerned that technology negatively impacts the quality of their conversations with their children; 54% say they are concerned that they have fewer conversations with their children than they would like because of technology.Parents recognize the potential hazard of personal audio devices to their children's hearing; 72% agree that loud noise from technology may lead to hearing loss in their children.Although it is encouraging that a vast majority of surveyed parents report putting limits on their children's technology use, the efficacy of those steps is questionable given other survey results. For example, 24% of 2-year olds use technology at the dinner table—a prime time for the kind of interaction that fosters strong communication development. By age 8, that percentage nearly doubles (45%). Also, by age 6, 44% of kids would rather play a game on a technology device than read a book or be read to. By age 8, a majority would prefer that technology is present when spending time with a family member or friend. In addition, more than half of parents surveyed say they use technology to keep kids ages 0–3 entertained; nearly 50% of parents of children age 8 report they often rely on technology to prevent behavior problems and tantrums. ASHA President Page encourages parents to set and enforce meaningful and healthy limits early and understand that usage rules need to be adapted as children get older and acquire new interests in technology. Noting that the majority of polled parents report that their kids use technology devices on car trips, Page says the coming summer season presents unique opportunities to engage kids. "If a long vacation drive is in store, parents may want to use the time to converse with their children. Such opportunities seem to be getting harder to come by in this busy world. It is important to take advantage of every chance to build strong communication skills."Parents can learn more at http://IdentifyTheSigns.org. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/5/8/2015 6:00:00 AM5/8/2015 6:00:10 AM5/7/2015 12:17:37 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonNew ASHA Survey of US Parents Significant Percentages Report That Very Young Children Are Using Technology5/8/2015 06:00:00 AM8589935339A10330False05/8/2015 06:00:10 AM5/7/2015 12:17:37 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/New-ASHA-Survey-of-US-Parents-Significant-Percentages-Report-That-Very-Young-Children-Are-Using-Technology/8589946863ContentNew Department of Education Guidance Issued to Ensure Access to SLP Services for Children With Autism/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/New-Department-of-Education-Guidance-Issued-to-Ensure-Access-to-SLP-Services-for-Children-With-Autism/The Department of Education has issued new guidance to ensure access to SLP services for children with autism.New Department of Education Guidance Issued to Ensure Access to Speech-Language Pathology Services for Children With AutismASHA Advocated Strongly for Department of Education ActionRockvilleMD2015-07-21In response to reports that a growing number of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may not be receiving needed speech and language services, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) has issued a new guidance to school systems nationwide recognizing the importance of speech-language pathology services and the necessary role of a speech-language pathologist in both evaluation and treatment of children with ASD.In particular, ED's Office of Special Education Programs noted concern that speech-language pathologists and other appropriate professionals are not being included in evaluation and eligibility determinations under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B, which ensures the availability of free appropriate public education to all eligible children with disabilities, or in meetings to develop the individualized education plan (IEP) or individualized family service plan (IFSP) as required under IDEA, Parts B and C, respectively. Part C ensures that eligible infants and toddlers with a disability have access to early intervention services that are designed to meet their developmental needs.In its guidance, ED states that some IDEA programs may be including applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapists exclusively without including, or considering input from, speech-language pathologists and other professionals who provide different types of therapies that may be appropriate for children with ASD. ED clarifies that ABA therapy is just one methodology used to address the needs of children with ASD—and reminds states and local programs to ensure that decisions regarding services are based on the unique needs of each child."We very much appreciate this guidance and believe that it will serve to ensure that children receive the appropriate treatment they deserve based on their individual needs," said Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2015 president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. "The specialized education, training and experience of speech-language pathologists make them a key part of the team that evaluates and treats a child with autism spectrum disorder." About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM7/21/2015 12:32:30 PM7/21/2015 11:42:26 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonNew Department of Education Guidance Issued to Ensure Access to SLP Services for Children With Autism8589935339A10330False07/21/2015 12:32:30 PM7/21/2015 11:42:26 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/New-Department-of-Education-Guidance-Issued-to-Ensure-Access-to-SLP-Services-for-Children-With-Autism/8589944243ContentNew Pediatrics Study Reveals Dramatic Increase in Speech Problems in Children Over Past Decade/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/New-Pediatrics-Study-Reveals-Dramatic-Increase-in-Speech-Problems-in-Children-Over-Past-Decade/A new study published this week in the journal Pediatrics reported a 63% increase in disability associated with speech problems from 2001–02 to 2010–11 among U.S. children, along with a more than 15% increase in disability associated with hearing problems.New Pediatrics Study Reveals Dramatic Increase in Speech Problems in Children Over Past DecadeHearing Problems Also on the Rise; Early Intervention Critical to Child Development, Academic and Social Success, Says ASHARockvilleMD2014-08-21A new study published this week in the journal Pediatrics reported a 63% increase in disability associated with speech problems from 2001–02 to 2010–11 among U.S. children, along with a more than 15% increase in disability associated with hearing problems. The data underscore the importance of early intervention for rising numbers of children who are experiencing communication disorders, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).On a broader level, the new study, Changing Trends of Childhood Disability, 2001–2011, showed that the percentage of children with disabilities rose 16% between 2001 and 2011. While childhood disability due to physical conditions has declined, a significant increase in disabilities due to neurodevelopmental or mental health problems was reported. Children in poverty experienced the highest rates of disability, but children from wealthier families experienced the largest increase (28%). The data was based on parent reports of disability, gathered from the government-conducted National Health Interview Survey.Authors of the study note the causes of the increases in neurodevelopmental or mental health problems are likely based on multiple factors, including biologic, familial, social and cultural factors. They additionally state that the increase in neurodevelopmental or mental health conditions was especially high among young children, a finding that may be attributed to increased awareness as well as the need for a specific diagnosis to receive services such as early intervention. Furthermore, they point out that although causes of autism are not identifiable in the data, it is likely that the increasing prevalence of autism may explain some of the rise in neurodevelopmental or mental health problems. "While the reasons behind the marked increase in speech and hearing problems may not be fully clear, the data argue for continued improved awareness among parents and the larger public about these disorders as well as speedy intervention at their earliest warning signs," said Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA 2014 president. "Unlike many other conditions, early intervention often has the potential to prevent or reverse a communication disorder—or at least dramatically reduce the negative consequences it has on children's academic and social success as well as their overall development. This is why ASHA urges parents to educate themselves about the signs and seek an assessment from a speech-language pathologist or audiologist if they have any concern at all."In late 2013, ASHA launched the Identify the Signs campaign, which uses public service announcements and a variety of other approaches to inform parents about these disorders. By visiting the website, parents can learn the early signs, find help, and share this critical information with their friends and families. "Through this campaign, we want to encourage parents to avoid the 'wait and see' approach that is all too common with speech and hearing disorders," continued McCrea. "The earlier we reach a child, the more successful, the less expensive, and the shorter the course of treatment. By delaying an assessment and/or treatment to see if a child outgrows a potential disorder, parents may be missing a key window of opportunity. The new study released this week further reaffirms the need for public awareness about these disorders so all children can be best positioned to meet their full potential."For more information, visit http://IdentifytheSigns.org.1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM9/3/2014 1:54:18 PM8/21/2014 12:37:14 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonNew Pediatrics Study Reveals Dramatic Increase in Speech Problems in Children Over Past Decade8589935226A10330False09/3/2014 01:54:18 PM8/21/2014 12:37:14 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/New-Pediatrics-Study-Reveals-Dramatic-Increase-in-Speech-Problems-in-Children-Over-Past-Decade/8589944737ContentOrlando Buds Media Advisory/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Orlando-Buds-Media-Advisory/ASHA's Listen To Your Buds safe listening campaign goes into six Orlando elementary schools next week.MEDIA ADVISORY: Award-Winning Listen to Your Buds Campaign Brings Safe Listening Concerts to Orlando SchoolsElementary Students to Learn How to Protect their Hearing for a Lifetime From Renowned MusiciansRockvilleMD2014-11-14With hearing loss dramatically rising among children and adolescents, as shown in a recent Pediatrics study, Orlando school children will learn how to protect their hearing through a series of fun, interactive, and educational concerts headlined by celebrated musicians Oran Etkin and Billy Jonas. The "safe listening" concerts, which will occur at six elementary schools this week, are part of the national Listen to Your Buds campaign. This will be the first time that the Buds campaign, developed by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), will visit Orlando.Listen To Your Buds is a public education effort aimed at preventing noise-induced hearing loss by helping teach young children how to use personal audio technology safely. It advocates practicing simple safe listening habits such as turning down the volume and taking listening breaks when using personal audio technology so children can avoid the devastating, lifelong effects that can accompany hearing loss. Untreated hearing loss can impact a child developmentally, academically, and socially. Recent research has shown that 1 in 5 kids ages 12–19 is now suffering from hearing loss, up 31% since the late 1980s/early 1990s. The World Health Organization (WHO), which is leading a global initiative to inform policymakers and educate the public about the risk of hearing loss from leisure activities, recognized Listen to Your Buds campaign as an effective outreach tool to support the initiative. What: Series of family-friendly concerts with hearing health messageWhen/Where: Various morning and afternoon concert times November 17, 18, and 19, 2014, at six elementary schools.Contact: If you are a member of the media and would like to attend a concert, please contact ASHA's Joseph Cerquone at jcerquone@asha.org or (703) 973-7744.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 173,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/ 11/14/2014 7:05:00 AM11/14/2014 7:05:03 AM11/13/2014 7:07:52 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonOrlando Buds Media Advisory11/14/2014 07:05:00 AM8589935226A10330False011/14/2014 07:05:03 AM11/13/2014 07:07:52 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2014/Orlando-Buds-Media-Advisory/8589973914ContentOver-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Over-the-Counter-Hearing-Aid-Act/The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has concerns regarding the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act, which was introduced in the U.S. Senate this week by Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA), and Representatives Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and Joseph Kennedy (D-MA).Statement by Gail Richard, President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, on the Introduction of the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid ActRockvilleMD2017-03-21"The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has concerns regarding the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act, which was introduced in the U.S. Senate this week by Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA), and Representatives Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and Joseph Kennedy (D-MA). ASHA supports greater access to hearing health care services, but believes the bill goes too far in expanding "direct to consumer" hearing aids to individuals with moderate hearing loss.  "We are encouraged by the willingness of the Senators and Representatives to work with ASHA to include measures that will advance safe and effective hearing health for many Americans.  "These measures include specific Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids that (1) establish or adopt output limits that are appropriate for the devices, (2) designate labeling requirements that cover how consumers may report adverse events using the devices, and (3) specify conditions or contraindications for which use is not advised.  "As the legislative process continues, ASHA looks forward to working with the Congressional offices involved on the aspects of this bill that are cause for concern. Those include the absence of any language specifying that OTC devices are for mild hearing loss only, the need for protections in the bill that ensure that children with hearing issues are not the users of OTCs, and the requirement for the FDA to collect data on adverse events and contraindications.  "ASHA remains committed to working closely with legislators on measures that provide the public with appropriate, effective, and safe hearing health care."      About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM3/21/2017 4:24:23 PM3/21/2017 4:17:56 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherOver-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act8589942931A10330False03/21/2017 04:24:23 PM3/21/2017 04:17:56 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Over-the-Counter-Hearing-Aid-Act/8589971785ContentOver-the-Counter Hearing Devices Could Make Hearing Worse/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Over-the-Counter-Hearing-Devices-Could-Make-Hearing-Worse/A recommendation by the National Academy of Sciences about over-the-counter hearing devices is off the mark.COMMENTARY: Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices Could Make Hearing WorseA recommendation by the National Academy of Sciences is off the markRockvilleMD2016-09-28By Jaynee Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A2016 President, American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationHearing music play, a baby cry, or the doorbell ring is something that many of us take for granted. But for the estimated 30 million Americans who suffer from hearing loss—many of them seniors on fixed budgets—access to the hearing devices they need to hear every day sounds poses a real challenge. The stakes are high: More than just a sensory issue affecting the ears, hearing loss is a serious medical condition that, if left untreated, can lead to depression, anxiety, and emotional instability. Increasing the affordability and accessibility of hearing help for older Americans is incredibly important. But misguided calls—by both the Obama Administration and the National Academy of Sciences—for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop a new class of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing devices would be an enormous step in the wrong direction, opening the door to the misuse of hearing devices and making treating hearing loss more difficult.According to a National Academy June report, there's no evidence that the existing FDA requirement for adults to have a medical evaluation or to sign an evaluation waiver to purchase a hearing device provides any clinically meaningful benefit. But treating a hearing problem isn't like searching for a pair of reading glasses at the drug store or treating a run-of-the-mill headache with pain medication. A trained professional is required to conduct a hearing test or audiogram and determine the exact cause of hearing loss—and whether or not hearing aids are the solution.The Obama Administration and the National Academy of Sciences are trying to push the FDA in the wrong direction by calling on them to loosen regulations on hearing aids to encourage the proliferation of lower-cost options. Policymakers and regulators must stress the need to maintain current policies, which recognize the vital role of health professionals in getting people the hearing help they need. Even if people have greater access to hearing devices, we can't expect them to know how to use them correctly without professional guidance.For example, once a patient and I decide that they need a hearing aid, I help them adapt to the device itself, which can be tricky. Many patients and policymakers mistakenly believe that simply amplifying sound will make things better for patients. But if patients don't know the magnitude of their hearing loss, they don't know if they're over-amplifying or under-amplifying. Too much amplification can damage their ear even more, and too little won't help them much in their daily lives. Audiologists like me help patients adjust to exactly the right volume.Beyond the issue of adult patients self-diagnosing, there would be nothing to stop parents from going to the drug-store and purchasing the OTC devices for their children, and that could have catastrophic results. Too much or too little amplification for children with hearing loss can cause developmental issues in the brain and even increase hearing loss.The bottom line is that a product doesn't miraculously fix hearing problems. And although the Obama Administration's proposal might seem more convenient for older Americans with hearing loss, convenience could come at the expense of undiagnosed medical conditions that are affecting patients' hearing.Rather than focusing on OTC hearing devices, the Obama Administration and the FDA must build policy around whole-person health care that takes into consideration the patient's lifestyle and isn't just about their ears. A better plan to address access and affordability is to educate the public about the serious need to take care of hearing health and to seek professional help when they notice the signs of hearing loss in themselves or those they love.The NAS is on the right track when it calls for Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance coverage of professional services for hearing health care, as well as greater access to hearing health and hearing aid programming information. These are recommendations that my organization, the American Speech-Hearing-Language Association, supports. The FDA's manufacturing standards for hearing aids aren't restrictive. They're simply in the best interest of patients. Policymakers and regulators can best advocate for hearing health by keeping health care professionals part of the process. Because if Americans don't have a proper hearing aid or don't know how to use it, not only are they missing out on conversations with their loved ones, but how are they going to hear the ambulance down the street or the smoke alarm going off at home?9/28/2016 12:05:00 AM9/28/2016 12:05:03 AM9/27/2016 8:35:19 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonOver-the-Counter Hearing Devices Could Make Hearing Worse9/28/2016 12:05:00 AM8589942122A10330False09/28/2016 12:05:03 AM9/27/2016 08:35:19 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Over-the-Counter-Hearing-Devices-Could-Make-Hearing-Worse/8589976929ContentPast CES Attendees Have Expressed Concern About Popular Technology Overuse, Survey Shows/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/Past-CES-Attendees-Have-Expressed-Concern-About-Popular-Technology-Overuse,-Survey-Shows/Survey results of a group of 2017 CES attendees reveal that 87% believe children are spending too much time with technology, and 74% feel today’s popular technology is negatively impacting conversation and social interaction.Past CES Attendees Have Expressed Concern About Popular Technology Overuse, Survey ShowsTech Devices Negatively Impacting Conversation and Social Interaction, Children Spending Too Much Time Using Them, According to Survey of 2017 AttendeesRockvilleMD2018-01-08As the newest technology innovations and gadgets are unveiled this week at CES 2018, survey results of a group of 2017 attendees released today by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) reveal that 87% believe children are spending too much time with technology, and 74% feel today’s popular technology is negatively impacting conversation and social interaction.Additionally, 82% of those CES 2017 attendees surveyed [PDF] by ASHA said the industry is not doing enough to educate the public about responsible usage, and 80% think the potential impact of technology should be considered as part of a product’s or app’s development process. The data represent results of a survey completed at CES 2017 by 218 attendees. Respondents included executives and staff involved in product development, product design, marketing and sales, information technology, health care, education, and other areas of the industry.With the unprecedented technological advancement that has taken place have come individual and societal benefits. Increasingly, however, reports indicate growing interest in more moderate use of popular technology. What is so striking about the results of ASHA’s poll is that some working in the technology industry appear to feel the same way.Polling [PDF] of more than 500 ASHA members—audiologists and speech-language pathologists—in 2016 revealed specific concerns about the impact of technology overload on communication. Audiologists indicted their chief concern was that repeated misuse of personal tech at loud volumes could damage children’s hearing. Meanwhile, speech-language pathologists said their primary concern was that excessive device use is replacing conversation and human interaction. If left unaddressed, 68 percent of the communication experts polled said they foresee widespread tech overuse as a communication "time bomb" that could irreparably damage the communication skills of future generations. This "time bomb" encompasses speech and language development, which is dependent on adequate time for verbal exchange such as listening, talking, reading, and interacting with parents—interactions that technology cannot duplicate—and hearing loss, which impedes communication as well as academic, social, and vocational success.Yet, in this same poll, experts said the solutions do not need to be draconian: 70% said their number one piece of advice is to set reasonable parameters and model safe usage, and less than 2% advocated for tightly restricting children’s tech use. In response to this polling, ASHA has launched a new Healthy Communication and Popular Technology Initiative and is actively seeking collaborating organizations, both inside and outside the tech industry. There is strong precedent for this type of collaboration. Consumer Technology Association CEO Gary Shapiro teamed with ASHA to offer some "Digital Diet" advice in the past. Others, inside and outside the technology industry, have spoken on the issue as well. They include Jony Ive, chief design officer for Apple, and Tristan Harris, a former product manager at Google who now speaks out against the danger of what he terms "tech addiction."For tips on finding healthy balance, view ASHA’s updated Digital Diet. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/11/2018 7:03:22 AM1/8/2018 12:53:41 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonPast CES Attendees Have Expressed Concern About Popular Technology Overuse, Survey Shows8589943539A10330False01/11/2018 07:03:22 AM1/8/2018 12:53:41 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2018/Past-CES-Attendees-Have-Expressed-Concern-About-Popular-Technology-Overuse,-Survey-Shows/8589964460ContentPodcast: Limited Coverage for Voice Disorders Treatment/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Podcast--Limited-Coverage-for-Voice-Disorders-Treatment/A new ASHA podcast addresses the issue of limited medical coverage for voice disorders treatment.New ASHA Podcast: Limited Health Care Coverage for Treatment of Voice DisordersUntreated Conditions Can Lead To More Expensive Surgeries Podcast Includes Patient Account of the Impact of a Common Disorder and Limited Coverage RockvilleMD2015-11-05A new podcast by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) addresses the limited health plan coverage for voice disorders—a widespread and significant health problem.Estimates of prevalence range from 3% to 7% of the general U. S. population. Untreated, voice disorders cost billions in lost productivity. For occupations like teaching, where voice use is heavy, the cost is almost $3 billion annually. Effective treatment is available. Yet, some of the largest insurers don't cover common conditions like muscle tension dysphonia. Why is that? Where does that leave people who have voice disorders? Do they have any options, and if so, what are they?ASHA's podcast asks these and other questions of Janet McCarty, who works in the area of private health plan reimbursement for ASHA; Dr. Denis Lafreniere, an ear, nose, and throat specialist; and, Starr Cookman, an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist. Dr. Lafreniere and Ms. Cookman have spent decades diagnosing and treating people who have voice disorders.Also, Kurt Cote, who has been diagnosed with muscle tension dysphonia, shares the experiences that he has had both living with the condition and trying to access care for it. ASHA offers a service known as ASHA ProFind www.asha.org/profind where listeners can locate ASHA-certified audiologists or speech-language pathologists in their local areas who treat communication disorders. About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM11/5/2015 4:37:00 PM11/5/2015 9:28:50 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonPodcast: Limited Coverage for Voice Disorders Treatment8589935339A10330False011/5/2015 04:37:00 PM11/5/2015 09:28:50 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Podcast--Limited-Coverage-for-Voice-Disorders-Treatment/8589972739ContentProfessional Counseling and Access Go Together When It Comes to Hearing Aids/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Professional-Counseling-and-Access-Go-Together-When-It-Comes-to-Hearing-Aids/ASHA's position on hearing aids reasserted after FDA statement released.ASHA: Professional Counseling and Access Go Together When It Comes to Hearing AidsPosition Reasserted in Wake of FDA AnnouncementRockvilleMD2016-12-09The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) today underscored the need for counseling and aural rehabilitation—provided by audiologists—to remain a critical part of public access to hearing aid technology. ASHA emphasized the point as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced this week that, starting immediately, it would no longer enforce the requirement that individuals over 18 years of age receive a medical evaluation or sign a waiver prior to purchasing most hearing aids. FDA continues to require medical evaluation for children prior to being fitted with a hearing aid. ASHA believes that consumers cannot and should not diagnose their own hearing loss. Patients should be strongly advised to seek a comprehensive audiologic evaluation from an audiologist or physician prior to utilizing any type of amplification device or other treatment for hearing loss—especially if the patient exhibits any of the warning signs of ear disease (e.g., tinnitus, dizziness, drainage, sudden hearing loss, asymmetry, foreign body in the ear, cerumen impaction, and/or congenital or traumatic deformity of the ear). The purpose of an audiologic evaluation is to determineonset and time course of the hearing loss;degree, type, and configuration of the hearing loss; possible etiology of the hearing loss; functional limitations imposed by the loss, particularly with regard to communication; andneed for additional medical or audiologic services, including the development of a treatment plan that may involve the fitting of hearing aids. "Hearing loss is a chronic health condition that affects many body and brain systems and whose treatment requires consideration of the whole person," said ASHA 2016 President Jaynee A. Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A. "While ASHA strongly supports greater access to technology, a common misconception is that a hearing aid alone is enough to overcome a hearing disability. Treatment for hearing loss is more complex and requires a comprehensive assessment of a patient’s needs as well as professional counseling and aural rehabilitation provided by audiologists to ensure successful adaptation to hearing technology."  ASHA has previously requested in written comments and testimony to FDA that the agency take a more comprehensive look at hearing health care—including the audiologist’s role in addressing a hearing disability—rather than solely focusing on amplification devices. ASHA also urged FDA to make recommendations that consider evidence-based hearing health care practices to improve affordable access to audiology services in addition to devices. ASHA has previously commented to FDA, in both a public presentation at the FDA and through formal comments, against changes to the current regulatory framework and stated that the FDA should take the following actions: Clarify and finalize guidance to make clear distinctions between personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), that are consumer electronic devices intended to amplify sound, and hearing devices, marketed for mild-to-moderate hearing loss, and strictly enforce compliance of hearing aid regulations.Require warning labels on PSAPs, devices, and aids regarding "red flags" for conditions that require medical treatment. Recommendations should also be included for individuals to seek the services of a hearing health care professional for their hearing health care needs.Work with the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and other appropriate health research organizations, to develop pilot programs and/or demonstration projects to evaluate new delivery models. The data and findings from these studies should be made available to the public.   About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM12/13/2016 12:50:16 PM12/12/2016 1:07:16 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonProfessional Counseling and Access Go Together When It Comes to Hearing Aids8589942122A10330False012/13/2016 12:50:16 PM12/12/2016 01:07:16 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/Professional-Counseling-and-Access-Go-Together-When-It-Comes-to-Hearing-Aids/8589974561ContentPublic Places Are Too Noisy/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Public-Places-Are-Too-Noisy/A new national survey of U.S. adults released today indicates that a significant percentage of Americans are concerned that exposure to loud noise in leisure settings has harmed or will harm their hearing, and they say that it is also reducing their enjoyment of those settings.From Millennials to Baby Boomers, U.S. Adults Say Public Places Are Too NoisyAcross Generations, Noisy Public Places Have People Fearing Hearing Loss More, Enjoying Leisure Activities LessRockvilleMD2017-05-03 A new national survey [PDF] of U.S. adults released today indicates that a significant percentage of Americans are concerned that exposure to loud noise in leisure settings has harmed or will harm their hearing, and they say that it is also reducing their enjoyment of those settings.Commissioned by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) for May Is Better Hearing & Speech Month,the survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults ages 18 and older shows surprisingly consistent results across age groups.In total, 41% of all adults polled are concerned that past exposure to loud leisure settings may have harmed their hearing—and more than half (51%) worry that future exposure could be harmful. Additionally, more than one third said loud noise has reduced their enjoyment of out-of-home activities.Bars, clubs, and concerts emerged as the "top noisiest" places in the ASHA polling. Restaurants and movie theaters also placed among the highest ranked locations where poll respondents said that noise has bothered them or kept them from visiting those establishments.Two-thirds of respondents polled felt that society has become noisier. Nearly half said they tend to prefer quiet or even very quiet out-of-home activities. And more than a quarter had decided not to return to a venue because they found it noisy. Somewhat surprisingly, the youngest generation polled, 18- to 29-year-olds, reported the highest level of dissatisfaction with the noise levels in public places."The good news to emerge from our polling is that hearing health was highly valued across all the age groups surveyed," said Gail Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA 2017 president. "More than 80% of all respondents said that their hearing status is extremely or very important, including almost three-quarters of 18- to 29-year-olds. This suggests a strong foundational appreciation of what could be lost to noise without sufficient protection. We urge both the public and those in charge of public venues to take steps to protect hearing health in their establishments."Individual Steps at Protection, But More Can Be TakenA majority of poll respondents (72%) reported taking at least one step to limit their exposure to noise. Among the more common actions were moving away from noise sources, choosing off-peak times to visit establishments, and bringing earplugs.There are additional steps that the public can take to protect themselves, Richard notes. These steps include asking for noise to be turned down, downloading a smartphone sound-level app to monitor noise, and researching the noise levels at destination venues ahead of time (many online business and restaurant review websites provide information on noise level).Message to Venues: Noise Is Neither Fun Nor Good for BusinessPoll results suggested that venues bear some responsibility for managing noise levels, including turning down the volume of music and loudspeakers and making design changes to lower ambient noise. Respondents also were largely in favor of increased education for consumers and business owners, and they supported requiring venues to make earplugs available, offer "hearing protection zones," and display noise-level monitors with clear "safe/unsafe" indicators."Our polling appears to discredit the notion that the public wants high noise levels to be part of their leisure activities," said Richard. "This should be a wake-up call to those who believe that noise equates with fun environments. In reality, it may very well alienate customers and may not be the best choice from a business standpoint."About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM6/5/2017 5:48:09 PM5/18/2017 10:06:53 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonPublic Places Are Too Noisy8589942931A10330False06/5/2017 05:48:09 PM5/18/2017 10:06:53 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Public-Places-Are-Too-Noisy/8589972025ContentThe Tech Effect: New ASHA Resources Show How Popular Technology May Be Impacting Todays Children/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/The-Tech-Effect--New-ASHA-Resources-Show-How-Popular-Technology-May-Be-Impacting-Todays-Children/New ASHA resources show how popular technology may be impacting children.The Tech Effect: New ASHA Resources Show How Popular Technology May Be Impacting Today’s Children, Offer Practical Tips for ParentsDigital Resources Released in Conjunction With 2016 AAP Conference in San FranciscoRockvilleMD2016-10-20With nearly all teens and a majority of toddlers now using tablets, smartphones, and other popular technology devices, the potential impact on children's development and overall health is a hot topic at this weekend's 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) conference. Against this backdrop, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is issuing some new digital resources to educate parents about specific areas of concern related to children's communication skills—and to provide practical advice for managing popular technology use in their households.The following resources may be linked, embedded, or reprinted as text with attribution to ASHA:The Tech Effect: How Too Much Device Time May Be Taking a Toll on Today's ChildrenResearch Roundup: Kids and Technology: Video spotlights recent research about technology's impact on language development, attention span, school performance, and hearing problems.Sounding Off: Video explores what communication experts, teachers, parents, and teens think about technology's hold on today's kids.The Digital Diet: 5 Tips to Maintaining Healthy Balance: Easy ways that families can reduce popular tech time in favor of communication and interaction.For more information on communication development, visit http://IdentifytheSigns.org.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org10/21/2016 7:00:00 AM10/28/2016 12:40:31 PM10/20/2016 11:53:47 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonThe Tech Effect: New ASHA Resources Show How Popular Technology May Be Impacting Todays Children10/21/2016 07:00:00 AM8589942122A10330False010/28/2016 12:40:31 PM10/20/2016 11:53:47 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2016/The-Tech-Effect--New-ASHA-Resources-Show-How-Popular-Technology-May-Be-Impacting-Todays-Children/8589973660ContentUnprecedented Study of Hearing Aid Outcomes/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Unprecedented-Study-of-Hearing-Aid-Outcomes/The first-ever placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of hearing aid outcomes shows that older adults benefit from hearing aid use.Unprecedented Study of Hearing Aid Outcomes in Older Adults Released TodayResearch Published in American Journal of Audiology Has Implications for Millions of Adults with Hearing LossRockvilleMD2017-03-02The first-ever placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of hearing aid outcomes published today in the American Journal of Audiology shows that older adults benefit from hearing aid use. Led by researchers at Indiana University with funding support (Grant No. R01 DC011771) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the study sought to compare patient outcomes when hearing aids are delivered via an audiology "best practices" model compared with an "over-the-counter" (OTC) model. In the context of this study, the OTC model meant that patients received a high-quality, pre-programmed hearing aid that was not fitted by an audiologist.The methodology is generally considered the highest standard for clinical trials."The research findings provide firm evidence that hearing aids do, in fact, provide significant benefit to older adults," said Larry Humes, PhD, CCC-A, a distinguished professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University Bloomington and the study's lead author. "This is important because, even though millions of Americans have hearing loss, there has been an absence of rigorous clinical research that has demonstrated clear benefits provided by hearing aids to older adults. Consequently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has not been able to support widespread hearing screening for adults over age 50. This study, along with others to follow, will help establish the evidence base needed to foster better hearing health care for many older Americans."The study looked at 154 adults ages 55–79 years with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. All participants received the same high-end digital mini hearing aids fitted in both ears. Subjects were divided into three groups. One (the best practices group) received "best practices" services from audiologists that included professional fitting and counseling; one (the OTC group) received no professional fitting by an audiologist and selected their own pre-programmed hearing aids; and one (the placebo group) received a professional fitting but used a hearing aid that was programmed to provide no acoustical benefit.Researchers found that hearing aids are effective in older adults for both the audiology best practices model and the OTC model. There were no significant differences in outcome between these two service-delivery approaches for five of the six outcome measures, but the OTC group fared somewhat worse when it came to satisfaction with their hearing aids. Fewer OTC participants were also likely to purchase their hearing aids after the trial (55% for the OTC group vs. 81% for the best practices group, with 36% for the placebo group). Following the initial 6-week trial, both the OTC and placebo groups were offered hearing aids under the best practices model. Satisfaction significantly increased for patients in both groups who chose to continue under audiologist care, and more participants opted to purchase their hearing aids after this continued period of care than after the initial trial.In the United States, a large discrepancy exists between the number of people who could benefit from hearing aids and those who actually wear them. Close to 29 million U.S. adults could benefit from using hearing aids, according to NIDCD. Yet, among adults aged 70 and older with hearing loss who could benefit from wearing hearing aids, fewer than one in three (30%) have ever used them. Even fewer adults aged 20–69 (approximately 16%) who could benefit have ever used them.In the study, researchers noted that NIDCD has prioritized identifying research areas that could lead to the improvement of hearing health care for adults with mild-to-moderate hearing loss—in particular, enhancing the accessibility and affordability of hearing health care. This study helps answer a high-priority research question of how current delivery systems can be used or modified to increase accessibility and affordability of hearing health care, according to study authors."More studies are needed to assess the generalization of the results obtained here to other patient populations, other devices, and other models of OTC service delivery," said Humes, adding, "All of the devices used in this study were of high quality as opposed to the simpler, less expensive devices many associate with an OTC model. Also, all patients received a complete audiologic evaluation prior to treatment—another potential difference from some OTC models under consideration. These factors could impact patient outcomes. However, the results of this study should serve as a yardstick for comparing outcomes of future hearing aid studies."The American Journal of Audiology is published by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.  About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org3/2/2017 4:00:00 AM3/1/2017 2:44:20 PM3/1/2017 2:44:19 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonUnprecedented Study of Hearing Aid Outcomes3/2/2017 04:00:00 AM8589942931A10330False03/1/2017 02:44:20 PM3/1/2017 02:44:19 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Unprecedented-Study-of-Hearing-Aid-Outcomes/8589946982ContentWashington Business Journal Names ASHA One of Region’s Healthiest Employers of 2015/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Washington-Business-Journal-Names-ASHA-One-of-Region-s-Healthiest-Employers-of-2015/Recognizing its strong commitment to creating a healthy workplace, the Rockville, Maryland-based American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has been named by the Washington Business Journal as one of Greater Washington's Healthiest Employers of 2015. Washington Business Journal Names ASHA One of Region’s Healthiest Employers of 2015RockvilleMD2015-08-14Recognizing its strong commitment to creating a healthy workplace, the Rockville, Maryland-based American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has been named by the Washington Business Journal as one of Greater Washington's Healthiest Employers of 2015. ASHA was honored in the category of companies with 199–499 employees. The list of healthiest employers is featured in today's issue of the Washington Business Journal. The awards were presented at the fifth annual Healthiest Employer event in Arlington, Virginia, last night."At ASHA, we are committed to helping make a healthy lifestyle achievable for all of our employees, which is why we are so proud to receive this tremendous acknowledgment from the Washington Business Journal," said Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CCC-SLP, CEO of ASHA. "Over the years, we have developed a robust and holistic wellness program that is truly ingrained in our culture. We know that a healthy and happy workforce is also a more engaged, committed, and productive workforce—allowing us to better serve our members."Launched in 1994, ASHA's Wellness Program has evolved over two decades to focus on helping employees build their resilience, both emotional and physical. ASHA provides resources to help staff deal with life's most stressful events—caring for an adult or child with significant health issues, financial stress, and relationship stress. ASHA educates employees about factors that can magnify stress, including sleep difficulties, mental health issues, and substance abuse. The Association helps employees buffer the effects of stress by fostering a strong peer network and providing resources to help people eat well and exercise regularly, among other things.ASHA engages its community of employees through office-wide wellness campaigns and team-based activities that have included healthy eating programs, a heart health initiative, a diabetes education program, and many creative activity-based challenges. At present, ASHA is running a campaign called Spring Into Motion that encourages people to be more active. The Association uses social media to further motivate and involve its staff in these programs. During ASHA's Mediterranean Lifestyle Challenge, employees exchanged healthy recipe ideas, tips, and personal experiences in nearly two dozen blog posts. This augmented other elements of the program, including live culinary demonstrations, to help employees achieve success.The Association makes exercise easy and accessible by hosting 14 fitness classes on-site each week. The variety of offerings, from yoga to dance to kickboxing, available at different times of the day and taught by various instructors, helps meet almost anyone's fitness needs and preferences. ASHA also invites family members to participate in campaigns and fitness classes. All of this is in addition to more traditional wellness efforts, such as on-site flu shots (free to staff and retirees at ASHA).For more information about ASHA's wellness initiative, as well as a listing of job openings, visit www.asha.org/Careers/ASHA-jobs/.About the American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 182,000 audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org/1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM2/10/2016 10:27:17 AM8/14/2015 9:10:18 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherWashington Business Journal Names ASHA One of Region’s Healthiest Employers of 20158589935339A10330False02/10/2016 10:27:17 AM8/14/2015 09:10:18 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2015/Washington-Business-Journal-Names-ASHA-One-of-Region-s-Healthiest-Employers-of-2015/8589975680ContentWider Access to OTC Hearing Aids Becomes Law/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Wider-Access-to-OTC-Hearing-Aids-Becomes-Law/President Donald Trump signed into law today the Food and Drug Administration Reauthorization Act of 2017, legislation that provides for greater public access to over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids.Wider Access to OTC Hearing Aids Becomes LawASHA Committed to Working With FDA on Related RegulationsRockvilleMD2017-08-18President Donald Trump signed into law today the Food and Drug Administration Reauthorization Act of 2017, legislation that provides for greater public access to over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids.  The measure enables adults with perceived mild to moderate hearing loss to access OTC hearing aids without being seen by a certified and licensed audiologist.  “The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is committed to working with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the development of the regulations that will guide the implementation of this new legislation,” ASHA President Gail J. Richard said.  ASHA has expressed concerns about measures like the new reauthorization legislation that give persons with moderate hearing loss access to OTC hearing aids.  “Greater degrees of hearing loss are serious medical conditions with broader health implications,” Richard noted in a recent statement.  “People who experience greater than a mild degree of hearing loss could take the misguided step of trying to seek relief via OTC solutions. A better course of care would involve treatment overseen by a certified and licensed audiologist.”  Richard also said it is in the public’s interest that Congress require the FDA to track the safety and user satisfaction issues that arise with greater access to OTC hearing aids. “That way, they could better assess the implications of a do-it-yourself model for hearing care.”About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM8/18/2017 8:08:24 PM8/18/2017 8:08:24 PM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMWillFisherWider Access to OTC Hearing Aids Becomes Law8589942931A10330False08/18/2017 08:08:24 PM8/18/2017 08:08:24 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/Wider-Access-to-OTC-Hearing-Aids-Becomes-Law/8589973525ContentWorld Hearing Day Spotlights Nearly 38 Million Americans Living With Hearing Loss/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/World-Hearing-Day-Spotlights-Nearly-38-Million-Americans-Living-With-Hearing-Loss/ASHA marks World Hearing Day observance with available educational resources.World Hearing Day Spotlights Nearly 38 Million Americans Living With Hearing LossASHA Offers New Resources Highlighting Availability and Benefits of Treatment to Mark WHO-Designated DayRockvilleMD2017-02-21One of the most prevalent health conditions to affect Americans, hearing loss goes chronically untreated despite the medical, mental health, and financial consequences of inaction. On March 3, World Hearing Day, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) asks the public to take action if they have concerns about their hearing.Effective treatment in the form of hearing aids and other assistive technologies are available for people with hearing loss across the life span, from infants to seniors. However, of the nearly 29 million U.S. adults who could benefit from using hearing aids, only 16% of those ages 20–69—and 30% of people age 70 and older—who could benefit have ever used them, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.The theme for World Hearing Day is "Action for Hearing Loss: Make a Sound Investment." It will highlight the economic impact of untreated hearing loss. World Hearing Day is organized by the World Health Organization (WHO), which this year is reporting that unaddressed hearing loss costs the global economy $750 billion annually. This includes costs to the health care system, societal costs, costs of lost productivity, and costs of additional educational support for children with hearing loss.To mark the WHO observance, ASHA is providing a new series of educational resources via a digital toolkit that offers information about the costs of leaving hearing loss untreated, consumer checklists for preventing and treating hearing loss, and facts about hearing loss. "We encourage anyone who is concerned about their hearing or a loved one’s to take action without further delay," said Gail J. Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP, 2017 ASHA President. "Hearing loss is far more than a nuisance. It can affect almost all aspects of life, often impacting a person's overall enjoyment and quality of life, academic and career status and success, mental health, and aspects of physical health. Ignoring concerns about hearing can come with costs far greater than the price of treatment."Anyone with questions about their hearing should visit a certified audiologist for a full hearing evaluation. A searchable database of certified audiologists nationwide is available at www.asha.org/profind.   About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. www.asha.org1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM5/11/2017 3:55:34 PM2/21/2017 10:05:13 AM12/31/9999 11:59:59 PMKarenGraham-CannonWorld Hearing Day Spotlights Nearly 38 Million Americans Living With Hearing Loss8589942931A10330False05/11/2017 03:55:34 PM2/21/2017 10:05:13 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/thumb_spacer.png/About/news/Press-Releases/2017/World-Hearing-Day-Spotlights-Nearly-38-Million-Americans-Living-With-Hearing-Loss/

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