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Practical Solutions for Elementary Assessment, Treatment, and Collaboration

September 23–October 12, 2020 | Online Conference

Conference Faculty

"I was most impressed by the speakers and their depth of knowledge and experience. This was an impressive and memorable learning experience."
Past ASHA Professional Development online conference participant

Bonnie Brinton, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Professor Emerita, Communication Disorders, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. Her work focuses on social communication in children with developmental language disorders. Brinton has served as associate professor at the University of Nevada, research scientist at the Schiefelbusch Institute for Lifespan Studies at the University of Kansas, Associate Dean, McKay School of Education at BYU, and Dean of Graduate Studies at BYU. She has worked as a speech-language pathologist in university, school, and hospital settings. Brinton has served as associate editor for the journal Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. In 2016, she and her colleagues received the editor's award from the journal Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools for the outstanding article published in 2015. Brinton is an ASHA Fellow, and in 2019, received Honors of the Association.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Life member of ASHA

Elsa Cárdenas-Hagan, EdD, CALT, CCC-SLP, is a bilingual speech-language pathologist and a Certified Academic Language Therapist. She is the director of Valley Speech Language and Learning Center in Brownsville, Texas, and works with the Texas Institute for Measurement Evaluation and Statistics for the University of Houston. Cárdenas-Hagan is the author of Esperanza (HOPE), a Spanish-language program designed to assist students who struggle with learning to read. Her research interests include the development of early reading assessments for Spanish-speaking students and the development of reading interventions for bilingual students. She was the co-principal investigator of a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Institute for Education Science that examined the oracy and literacy development in English and Spanish of Spanish-speaking children. She serves as the Vice President of the International Dyslexia Association and has authored curricular programs, book chapters, and journal articles related to oracy and literacy development for English language learners.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Past Vice-Chairperson of the International Dyslexia Association when the term Structured Literacy was developed and defined
  • Volunteer member of the International Dyslexia Association 

Bridget Allen Chapman, MA, CCC-SLP,  is a licensed and certified speech-language pathologist. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University and serves as coordinator of The Flaum Fluency Program. She received her BS from West Virginia University and her MA from the University of Pittsburgh. Chapman has experience working with pediatric clients in outpatient clinics, schools, and home-based settings. She currently teaches and provides supervision to graduate clinicians in the OSU Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic. Her focus of interest is working with children and adults who stutter. She is involved in SSPEAK-The Annie Glenn Chapter of the National Stuttering Association at Ohio State and FRIENDS-The National Association of Young People Who Stutter.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Salary from The Ohio State University
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • SLP Clinical Education Convention Coordinator for FRIENDS: The National Association for Young People Who Stutter  

Laura S. DeThorne, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Chair and Professor of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences at Western Michigan University. Her scholarship focuses on supporting communication competence in the everyday interactions of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, including access to augmentative and alternative communication and integration of first-person perspectives. She has served as an associate editor for the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and has reviewed grants for a variety of national and international agencies. Her work has been funded by NICHD, U.S. Department of Education, and private foundations. DeThorne particularly enjoys faculty and student mentoring.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Coming soon

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Coming soon

Carolyn Dolby, MS, CCC-SLP, specializes in pediatric feeding and swallowing evaluations and interventions as the Dysphagia Support Speech-Language Pathologist for Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District in Houston, Texas. As a clinician, she has served populations across the life span in medical, home, and school settings as well as in private practice. She presents locally and nationally with a focus on providing dynamic school-based dysphagia services.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Employed by Cypress Fairbanks Independent School District
  • Compensated for school district presentations and a graduate course at the University of Houston
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Guest speaker at TSHA (Houston), ASHA (Boston), Region 4 Education Service Center (Houston), and Lone Star College (Tomball) Occupational Therapy Assistant Program 
  • Volunteer dysphagia consultant for schools across Texas 

Kelly Farquharson, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor and director of the Children Literacy and Speech Sound Lab at Florida State University. Her research interests include school-age children with phonological and language disorders; the effect of those disorders on the acquisition of literacy skills; and the cognitive, environmental, and academic factors that contribute to phonological and language disorders. Prior to pursuing a research degree, she was a school-based SLP in Pennsylvania.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Perry Flynn, MEd, CCC-SLP, is an ASHA Fellow, Professor at the University of North Carolina Greensboro in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and the Consultant to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in the area of speech-language pathology. He is an Operation Smile volunteer and a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship Certified Instructor.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Paid by the University of North Carolina Greensboro
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Martin Fujiki, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Professor Emeritus, Department of Communication Disorders, Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. His work focuses on the social and emotional competence of children with developmental language disorders. He received his bachelor of science degree at the University of Idaho and his master's and doctorate degrees from the University of Utah. He has served on ASHA's Ad Hoc Committee for Language in Context. He has also served as an associate editor for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, and Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Fujiki is an ASHA Fellow and in 2015 received the Honors of the Association. In 2016, Fujiki and colleagues received the editor's award from Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools for the outstanding article published during the previous year. In addition to his university experience, Fujiki has worked as a school speech-language pathologist in two school districts.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Life member of ASHA

Laura T. Glastetter-Stone, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a school-based SLP who has served schools in Central Kentucky for more than 20 years and in Scott County School System in Georgetown, Kentucky, for more than 15 years. She recently earned her PhD from the University of Kentucky, with a research emphasis on service delivery models for SLPs in schools. She is currently the Vice President of Schools-elect for the Kentucky Speech and Hearing Association. In 2018, Glastetter-Stone answered a question about service delivery models that was published in The Informed SLP, and this led to her first invited presentation for ASHA. She also has other research interests, including literacy and AAC use in schools. She has taught as an adjunct professor at Eastern Kentucky University and will teach online for Murray State University in the fall of 2020. 

Financial Disclosures:

  • Employed by Scott County Schools 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • ASHA member
  • KSHA Vice President of Schools-Elect for the Kentucky Hearing Association Convention
  • Dissertation completed at University of Kentucky, with emphasis on service delivery models

Marie Ireland, MEd, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, is a nationally board certified speech-language pathologist with advanced expertise in child language who serves as the Virginia Department of Education's specialist for speech-language pathology. She is ASHA's Vice President of SLP Practice and has served on numerous committees for ASHA. She served on the State Education Agencies Communication Disabilities Council (SEACDC) board for 14 years.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Employed by Virginia Department of Education, which allowed her to present this as part of her job
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation and for participation on ASHA Board of Directors

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of ASHA Board of Directors
  • Member of SEACDC

Nichole Mulvey, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Eastern Illinois University. She worked as a school-based speech-language pathologist for 10 years before joining the faculty at EIU and continues to provide services as an early intervention therapist. She teaches graduate courses in early childhood and school-age language disorders and supervises graduate student clinicians, focusing on remediation of speech and language deficits in childhood and adolescent cases. She is also the coordinator for ASHA SIG 1 (Language Learning and Education). Mulvey's research interests include early language and social development, language sampling, narrative and literacy abilities, and curriculum and instruction for language-based skills.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Employed by Eastern Illinois University 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Coordinator for ASHA SIG 1 (Language Learning and Education)

Casey Oliver, MS, CCC-SLP, is a singer, choir director, voice teacher, and speech-language pathologist who specializes in the care and training of the singing voice. She has undergraduate degrees in music and speech-language pathology, as well as a graduate degree in speech-language pathology, from the University of Nevada, Reno. She is a member of ASHA, the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS), and the National Association of Pastoral Musicians (NPM). Early in her career, she worked as a school-based speech-language pathologist and has had the opportunity to consult on a variety of voice and craniofacial disorder cases in multiple school districts. Her experience working as a school-based SLP and serving as a consultant on voice disorder cases has given her the gift of perspective and a passion for helping fellow SLPs confidently serve voice students on their caseloads. After an extended maternity leave, she is once again operating her own private SLP consulting practice and voice studio. Additionally, she currently serves as music director and cantor at Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic Church in Carmichael, California.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Associate member of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) 
  • Member of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians
  • Music director at Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic Church in Carmichael, California
"Each presenter was very experienced and knowledgeable about the specific topic and provided information of practical value in the real treatment world."
Past ASHA Professional Development online conference participant

Katelyn F. Slone, MS, CCC-SLP, is a school-based speech-language pathologist in Kentucky. Slone is passionate about using collaborative models in the school setting with a focus on vocabulary and AAC. She has presented at ASHA Convention in the area of peer support models and AAC. Her area of treatment focuses on multiple and severe disabilities. She is pursuing a PhD at the University of Kentucky with a research focus of AAC.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation 

Shelley L. Velleman, PhD, CCC-SLP, has a linguistics doctorate with a specialization in child phonology and a master's degree in speech-language pathology. She has been teaching Communication Sciences and Disorders since 1984. She also held full-time clinical positions in pediatric speech-language pathology for 6 years. Velleman is currently Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Vermont. Her teaching, research, and clinical work focus on typical and atypical speech development. With respect to typical speech development, she has researched prelinguistic vocalizations, early words, and the early speech development of children learning a variety of languages and dialects. With respect to atypical speech development, she specializes in pediatric motor speech disorders, especially childhood apraxia of speech. She studies the speech of children with neurodevelopmental syndromes such as Williams syndrome, 7q11.23 Duplication syndrome, and autism spectrum disorder. She has authored many articles and book chapters and three books on these topics. She has presented peer-reviewed papers at scientific conferences and invited clinical workshops around the United States and around the world. Velleman is an ASHA Fellow and a Fellow of the National Academies of Practice. She has been a member of the Apraxia-Kids Professional Advisory Council since 2000.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Grant funding from Apraxia-Kids
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation 

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Apraxia-Kids Professional Advisory Council

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