Language Bar

Spoken and Written Language in Adolescents: Fresh Solutions

February 21–March 5, 2018 | Online Conference

Conference Faculty

Barbara J. Ehren, EdD, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, is a professor at the University of Central Florida and director of a doctoral program that focuses on language and literacy for learners who struggle. Prior to this position, she was a research scientist with the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning (KUCRL), where her emphasis was on strategic reading for adolescents, collaboration among professionals in schools, and school-wide literacy initiatives in secondary schools, including Response-to-Intervention/Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (RTI/MTSS). Her experience includes many years in public schools as an SLP, teacher, and district administrator. She serves on numerous committees and editorial boards, including the ASHA Advisory Board on School Issues. She has been awarded ASHA Fellow and Honors of the Association. She has a special interest in helping school systems build more effective literacy programs for diverse learners at the school level. A recurrent theme of her work is shared responsibility for literacy acquisition. She is a frequent consultant to states, school districts, and professional associations and has authored many publications related to language, literacy, and collaborative school practice.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Michael Faggella-Luby, PhD, is currently the director of the Alice Neeley Special Education Research & Service (ANSERS) Institute and an associate professor of special education in the College of Education at Texas Christian University (TCU). His research includes the design, observation, and analysis of evidence-based practices to improve reading comprehension and content area learning for students with learning disabilities. He has written publications related to cognitive learning strategies, response-to-intervention (RtI)/scientifically research-based instruction (SRBI), self-determination, literacy, post-secondary education for students with disabilities, and urban school reform. Faggella-Luby received the 2006 Outstanding Researcher Award from the Council for Learning Disabilities and the 2007 Annual Dissertation Award from CEC's Division of Learning Disabilities for his dissertation study, "Embedded Learning Strategy Instruction: Story-Structure Pedagogy in Secondary Classes for Diverse Learners." Faggella-Luby is a former high school administrator and teacher of both English and chemistry.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Zhihui Fang, PhD, is a professor of education in the School of Teaching and Learning at the University of Florida. He is author of more than 100 publications that include books, book chapters, and refereed journal articles, as well as more than 200 refereed, invited, keynote, and featured presentations at national and international venues. He has served as column editor, editorial board member, or guest reviewer for more than 20 national and international journals. His areas of expertise include language and literacy education, functional linguistics, and teacher education. Fang's recent research focuses on the language demands of disciplinary reading and writing. He is particularly interested in exploring the use of evidence-based language and literacy practices to support disciplinary learning and socialization. His research and outreach efforts have been funded by federal and state departments of education, professional organizations, and private foundations.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Linda Freeman, MS, CCC-SLP, is a clinical educator at James Madison University. Prior to starting at JMU, she was a school-based SLP who served preschool through post-high school students. She spent 8 years at the middle/high school level, much of which was spent focusing on adolescent language and literacy within the Content Literacy Continuum. Freeman is also a certified SIM professional developer in learning strategies.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Diane Gillam, MEd, is a research project manager with the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning and a Strategic Instruction Model Professional Developer Leader. She has spent her career working with students with disabilities and students who struggle with literacy. Through multiple projects extending over the past decade, she has worked with state agencies as well as local educational agencies to provide support to educators as they adopt and adapt instructional practices to benefit all learners, but especially students with disabilities in language and literacy.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Sam Goldstein, PhD, ABPdN, is an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He is clinical director of the Neurology Learning and Behavior Center. Goldstein has authored more than 50 books as well as more than 30 book chapters and 30 research articles. He has also co-authored eight psychological tests. He currently serves as Editor in Chief of the Journal of Attention Disorders and sits on the editorial boards of six peer reviewed journals.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Kim Murza, PhD, CCC-SLP, received her doctorate in Communication Sciences and Disorders from the University of Central Florida, where she specialized in language and literacy with a focus on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado, teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in language and literacy, evidence-based practice, and phonetics. Murza has worked privately and in the public school system as a speech-language pathologist with children and adolescents in preschool through high school, and more recently with adults with autism spectrum disorder. She is currently the University of Northern Colorado Scottish Rite Program Director and a member of the Colorado Department of Education Speech-Language Advisory Committee. Murza has participated in numerous research projects and co-authored peer-reviewed journal articles and presentations. She has been an invited author and presenter for several topics, including autism spectrum disorder and adolescent language and literacy. Her main research area is pragmatic language intervention and vocational support for individuals with high-functioning forms of autism spectrum disorder. Additional research interests include systematic review and meta-analysis, strategic learning, inference generation, disciplinary literacy, and the delivery of high-quality professional development.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Employee of University of Northern Colorado
  • Will receive royalties from MedBridge for four online courses, some on the topic of ASD, once they are launched
  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Colorado Department of Education Speech-Language Advisory Committee
  • Mmember of the ASHA School Issues Advisory Board

Nickola Wolf Nelson, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-C, is Professor Emerita in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences and former director of the Interdisciplinary Health Sciences PhD program at Western Michigan University. She conducts research and publishes books and articles in language-literacy development and disorders and is first author of the Test of Integrated Language and Literacy Skills (TILLS; 2016), editor of Topics in Language Disorders, an ASHA Fellow, and recipient of the Kleffner Clinical Career Award of the ASHFoundation and Honors of ASHA.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Royalties from Brookes Publishing for Test of Integrated Language and Literacy Skills (TILLS) and Student Language Scale (SLS)              

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation 

Marilyn A. Nippold, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor of Communication Disorders and Sciences at the University of Oregon, where she teaches and conducts research in language development, language disorders, and stuttering. An ASHA Fellow, she has published 8 books and more than 125 journal articles and book chapters. Nippold has received ASHA Honors and two Editor's Awards from ASHA.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Kristine Noel, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and educational consultant who has worked as a coordinator of special education and as a clinician in public schools, clinics, hospitals, Head Start programs, and juvenile justice settings. She has collaborated extensively with teachers, learning communities, administrators, and related service staff to increase students’ academic achievment and behavioral competence, and to create safe, caring, and positive learning envorinments. Her professional and research interests include language, literacy, and behavior intervention with high-risk adolescents. Currently she is the Hawaii Director with EBS Healthcare and lives in Pupukea, Hawaii.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Employee of EBS Healthcare
  • May receive royalties from Cognitive Press for Social Problem Solving
  • Co-author of Conversations Framework: A Program for Adolescents and Young Adults
  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Rauno Parrila, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Educational Studies at Macquarie University in Australia. He is a former editor of Scientific Studies of Reading and Developmental Disabilities Bulletin and serves on the editorial board of several international journals. His current research focuses on how psychological, behavioral, and environmental factors interact in producing both typical and atypical reading development. His first main line of inquiry focuses on what we can learn from the success stories among poor readers: adults with reading disabilities who are completing post-secondary education. The factors his group is currently examining include learning and linguistic skills, motivation and personality dispositions, and the use of different environmental and technical support systems, both informal and formal. The second main line of inquiry focuses on the universality of reading acquisition theories and investigates how different characteristics of language, orthography, and home environment interact with cognitive skills in reading acquisition process. The long-term goal of this work is to develop a more comprehensive theoretical model of reading acquisition and difficulties across writing systems that can guide differentiation in instruction, service development for struggling readers, and assessment practices for students at all levels of education.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Garvin P. Romane, PhD, CCC-SLP, received his doctorate in language, literacy, and learning from Fordham University. He is an adjunct professor of speech-language pathology at Touro College in Brooklyn and a supervisor of speech-language pathologists and audiologists for the Brentwood Union Free School District in Brentwood, New York. His research interests include cultural and linguistic diversity in students, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and iPads, and the use of technology to stimulate language skills.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Linda I. Rosa-Lugo, EdD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Florida. She has worked in a variety of settings, providing direct services to Spanish- and English-speaking infants, school-aged children, deaf and hard of hearing students, and geriatric patients with communication disorders, as well as supervising student clinicians. She is the Principal Investigator of a USDOE/OSEP collaborative grant with USF and has been the PI and the Coordinator of two additional USDOE, OSEP Personnel Preparation Grants that prepared SLPs to provide services to English learners with communication disorders, the latter in developing listening and spoken language in children with hearing loss who come from linguistically diverse homes. Her research interests include language and literacy development in Hispanic youngsters who are deaf/hard of hearing, and first and second language acquisition in English learners. Rosa-Lugo is author of articles and chapters, and is completing her second book. Her contributions to the profession has earned her many awards, most notably the ASHA Fellow Award and the ASHA Certificate in Multicultural Contributions.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Cheryl Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, is currently Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Rush University Medial Center. At Rush, she taught courses in child speech and language disorders and conducted child language assessments in the Speech Language, and Hearing Clinic. Scott’s research and publications center on the performance of children and adolescents with language impairment on tasks that require complex language. Her most recent research is a treatment efficacy study targeting complex sentences for older students with language impairments, funded by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Scott is interested in connections between listening, talking, reading, and writing and how these connections can be exploited in treatment. She is an ASHA Fellow and a 2015 recipient of ASHA Honors.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Grant support from National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation Clinical Research Grant
  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Gloria Soto, PhD, completed her doctorate in special education with a concentration in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in 1994 at Purdue University. She has been on the SFSU faculty since 1995. Her areas of interests include language development and intervention through AAC, provision of AAC services in school settings, professional attitudes toward the use of AAC, and the provision of AAC services to children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Among Soto’s numerous publications are two books, Practically Speaking: Language, Literacy, and Academic Development for Students with AAC Needs, co-edited with Carole Zangari, and AAC in the Schools: Best Practices for Interventions, coauthored with Nancy Robinson.

Financial Disclosures:

  • This research was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health
  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Susan Trumbo, MS, is a retired SLP, having provided services for the last 9 years of her career in secondary schools implementing a tiered approach to serving the needs of students. She continues to mentor SLPs in her division and is an independent consultant providing professional development in the Strategic Instruction Model Learning Strategies.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

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