Language Bar

Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia

December 5–17, 2018 | Online Conference

Conference Faculty

Julia Carpenter, MA, CCC-SLP, is the clinical practice leader for speech-language pathology and research speech-language pathologist at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. She studied linguistics and Spanish at the University of Michigan before pursuing her master's degree at Northwestern University. Carpenter has worked with inpatient, day rehabilitation, and outpatient levels. In her current role, she works with speech-language pathologists across the organization to implement best practices, facilitates aphasia community groups, works on a variety of aphasia research projects, and treats patients in the Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment’s Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this live chat
  • Research SLP investigating certain technology in aphasia at Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

Suzanne M. Coyle, MA, CCC-SLP, joined the Stroke Comeback Center (SCC) as Member Services Director in 2008. Located in Vienna, Virginia, Stroke Comeback Center is a community-based nonprofit organization providing 40+ weekly communication and exercise classes for stroke and brain trauma survivors. Prior to joining SCC, Coyle was a senior speech-language pathologist at the MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, where she worked primarily with survivors of stroke and brain injury. She has presented on aphasia group treatment, quality of life in people with aphasia, and clinical ethics at the local and national level. She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She served two terms as president of the District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association and recently completed a graduate certificate in nonprofit management from the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Member Services Director at the Stroke Comeback Center (SCC)
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

David Dow is a stroke survivor, nonprofit founder, national speaker, and author. He had a massive stroke in 1995 that required 3 months hospitalization and then speech and language therapy to relearn speaking, reading, and writing. He has appeared on Good Morning America, in People magazine, and, most recently, on The Doctors. Dow is a director of cruises and events for a nonprofit organization.  

Financial Disclosures:

  • Co-author of Healing The Broken Brain: Leading Experts Answer 100 Questions About Stroke Recovery and Brain Attack: My Journey of Recovery From Stroke and Aphasia
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Vice president and director of cruises and events for Aphasia Recovery Connection
  • Member of AphasiaAccess

Carol Dow-Richards is an aphasia caregiver, support group leader, nonprofit founder, national speaker, and author. She has received numerous awards for her advocacy on behalf of families dealing with aphasia. She entered the world of aphasia when her 10-year-old son suffered a massive stroke. Later, she started stroke cruises, and in 2013, she started an online support group on Facebook, Aphasia Recovery Connection.   

Financial Disclosures:

  • Independent contractor for the Stroke and Aphasia Support Group by St. Rose Dominican Hospital
  • Co-author of Guide to Living with Aphasia
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Founding board member and executive director of Aphasia Recovery Connection
  • Member of AphasiaAccess

Lisa Edmonds, PhD, CCC-SLP, is licensed speech-language pathologist and an associate professor and program director in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is also the director of the Aphasia Rehabilitation and Bilingualism Research Lab, where she conducts clinical research studies that evaluate treatments and assessments in persons with aphasia, including Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST), a treatment Edmonds developed and continues to study in various contexts. The work of the lab is fundamentally to promote generalization (improvement beyond what is trained) in people with monolingual and bilingual aphasia within written and spoken modalities across multiple levels of language (single words, sentences, and discourse).   

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate professor and program director in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Teachers College, Columbia University 
  • Grant funding from U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

Teresa Gray, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor at San Francisco State University and director of the Gray Matter Lab. Her research examines the relationship and interaction between cognitive control and language control in bilingual aphasia in order to identify potential overlapping mechanisms. Gray is also interested in the role of attention processes in aphasia and how they can be harnessed in treatment. 

Financial Disclosures:

  • Assistant professor at San Francisco State University and director of the Gray Matter Lab
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

Jacqueline Hinckley, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a clinical researcher and consultant with 30 years of clinical experience. She currently serves as executive director of Voices of Hope for Aphasia, the only community-based nonprofit aphasia program in West Central Florida. She is the author of a book entitled Narrative-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, which focuses on the use of narrative and phenomenological approaches in clinical practice and research. Hinckley is Associate Professor Emeritus at University of South Florida. She is Board Certified in Neurogenic Communication Disorders and serves on the Advisory Board of the National Aphasia Association. She is an affiliate of AphasiaAccess. She is also the author of What Is It Like to Have a Communication Impairment? Simulations for Family, Friends, and Caregivers, and the author or co-author of numerous book chapters and journal articles on subjects relevant to treatment in neurogenic communication disorders.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Executive director of Voices of Hope for Aphasia
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Advisory board member of the National Aphasia Association

Audrey Holland, PhD, CCC-SLP, has had a long career working primarily with adults who have neurogenic speech and language disorders. Her work has centered on clinical research, teaching, and direct clinical management of people with aphasia and dementia.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Project consultant for the Carnegie-Mellon University AphasiaBank project 
  • Consultant on various federal contracts
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

Tami Howe, PhD, CCC-SLP, is currently a member of faculty in the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. She was previously a faculty member in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. Prior to completing doctoral and postdoctoral studies at The University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, Howe worked for several years as a speech-language pathologist with adults with neurogenic communication disorders in acute care, inpatient rehabilitation, outpatient, dayward, and community settings in Canada and New Zealand. Howe's research focuses on how adults with aphasia and their family members live with their communication disorder, with the ultimate goal of finding ways to improve their quality of life.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Assistant professor at the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences at the University of British Columbia
  • Grant funding from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Aphasia Committee for the Stroke Recovery Association of British Columbia

Jaime B. Lee, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at James Madison University, where she teaches coursework in neurogenic communication disorders, aphasia, and cognitive rehabilitation. Lee worked clinically at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and as a research SLP at RIC's Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment, where she was involved in a number of federally funded studies investigating computer-based treatments for aphasia. Her research interests include single-case research methodology, attentional impairment in aphasia, treatment for reading and writing, and social approaches to improve communication and quality of life in aphasia. She is a co-investigator on a DHHS National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) Field Initiated grant "Improving electronic written communication in aphasia."

Financial Disclosures:

  • Assistant professor at James Madison University
  • Former researcher at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

Tim Nanof, MSW, is ASHA's director of health care policy & advocacy. He is a coach of six health care advocacy staff at ASHA, addressing all aspects of health care regulatory policy and reimbursement. He is also the staff ex-officio of the Health Care Economics Committee. Nanof has been with ASHA for roughly 5 years, and before that he served as the director of federal affairs addressing legislative health and special education policy issues for the American Occupational Therapy Association. He is a graduate of the University of Maine and George Mason University in Virginia.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Director of Health Care Policy & Advocacy at ASHA

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Ex-officio of the ASHA Health Care Economics Committee

Marjorie L. Nicholas, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor and current interim chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. She is a founder of the Aphasia Center at the Institute, which provides services to people from the community with aphasia and other neurogenic communication disorders. Prior to joining the Institute in 2001, she worked at the Boston VA Medical Center for 15 years, learning from her mentor Nancy Helm-Estabrooks and many others in the Harold Goodglass Aphasia Research Center. She regularly teaches courses on aphasia and neurodegenerative disorders and participates in research investigating language and nonverbal cognition in people with aphasia.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Professor and interim chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at MGH Institute of Health Professions
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Academy of Aphasia, the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences, and ASHA

Janet P. Patterson, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Chief of the Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology Service at the VA Northern California Health Care System. She also teaches graduate courses in aphasia and related neurogenic language disorders, as well as motor speech disorders, in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at California State University, East Bay, where she was formerly a faculty member, director of the Aphasia Treatment Program, and department chair. She has worked in public school, home health, university, and hospital clinical environments. Her career has been devoted to understanding aphasia as a disorder and its assessment and treatment, and she has participated in scholarly review and treatment research projects focused on aphasia. Patterson is an ASHA Fellow, and member and former coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Group 2, Neurogenic Communication Disorders.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Chief of Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology Service at the VA Northern California Health Care System and a regular lecturer at California State University
  • Grant funding from VA RR&D
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the executive board and writing group at the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences
  • Member of ASHA Special Interest Group 2, Neurogenic Communication Disorders

John Schultz, MD, came to understand more about aphasia as David Dow's partner. He has attended numerous aphasia events and has interacted with more than 100 people with aphasia. He volunteers as a speaker and medical team volunteer for Aphasia Cruises, where he interacts with passengers and listens to their stories, and works to help patients self-advocate in the medical setting.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Anesthesiologist at Whiteville Hospital
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Volunteer and speaker for Aphasia Recovery Connection
  • Medical team volunteer and speaker for Aphasia Cruises

Peter Turkeltaub, MD, PhD, is an associate professor of neurology and rehabilitation medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center and director of the Aphasia Clinic at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital. He received an MD and PhD in neuroscience from Georgetown University and completed a residency in neurology and fellowship in cognitive behavioral neurology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on post-stroke aphasia and aims to expand our understanding of how the brain performs language and cognitive functions, how these brain systems change in the face of injury or dysfunction, and how we can improve recovery. His research has been funded by the NIH, The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the American Brain Foundation, and the International Dyslexia Association. He was awarded the 2017 Norman Geschwind Prize in Behavioral Neurology from the American Academy of Neurology for his contributions to aphasia research.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate professor at Georgetown University and MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital
  • Grant funding from NIH and the Doris Duke Foundation
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Board member of the National Aphasia Association

Sarah E. Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor and program director for the Adult Language and Cognition Clinic in the Speech-Language Pathology Department at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Wallace also directs the Communication and Cognition Lab.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate professor and program director for the Adult Language and Cognition Clinic in the Speech-Language Pathology Department at Duquesne University
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Coordinator for ASHA SIG 2, Neurogenic Communication Disorders
  • Volunteer with ANCDS

Darlene S. Williamson, MA, CCC-SLP, is the founder and executive director of the Stroke Comeback Center, in Vienna, Virginia. She has more than 35 years of experience working with people with aphasia. She is adjunct faculty at The George Washington University, with a primary research interest in apraxia. She holds degrees from Purdue University and the University of Illinois. Williamson is a member of ASHA, SHAV, and the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences, and is serving as president of the National Aphasia Association. She has won several local and regional awards for her efforts on behalf of individual with aphasia and is dedicated to advocacy, advancement, and quality of life for survivors.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Executive director at Stroke Comeback 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • President of the National Aphasia Association

Heather Harris Wright, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders and associate dean for research for the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University. Her research focus includes assessment and treatment of persons with aphasia and identifying the influence of cognitive function on language processing in aphasia and across the adult life span. Her previously funded research by NIH involved investigating the interaction among cognitive operations and linguistic components of discourse processing in cognitively healthy adults across the life span. Wright is the North American editor for Aphasiology and co-editor of Seminars in Speech and Language. She has presented her work at numerous national and international conferences and has been published in several journals, including Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Aphasiology, and Brain and Language.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Professor and associate dean for research at East Carolina University
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to disclose

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