American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

EBP Compendium: Summary of Systematic Review

Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences; American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Department of Veterans Affairs
Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations: Caregiver-Administered Active Cognitive Stimulation for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease

Zientz, J., Rackley, A., et al. (2007).
Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 15(3), xxvii-xxxiv

Indicators of Review Quality:

The review addresses a clearly focused question Yes
Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided No
Search strategy is described in sufficient detail for replication Yes
Included studies are assessed for study quality Yes
Quality assessments are reproducible Yes

Description: This is a review of quantitative studies pertaining to indirect interventions for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review is part of a series of reports from the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Science specific to the assessment and management of individuals with dementia.

Question(s) Addressed:

  1. What is the purpose and content of caregiver-administered active cognitive stimulation?
  2. Who are the participants who received this intervention?
  3. What are the outcomes of the intervention?
  4. What are the key methodological concerns?
  5. What are the clinically applicable trends across these studies?

Population: Individuals with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Intervention/Assessment: Indirect caregiver intervention. Active cognitive stimulation programs consisting of activities for memory and conversation skills.

Number of Studies Included: 3

Years Included: 1960 - 2002

Findings:

Conclusions:

  • Treatment
    • Cognitive-Communication
      • Restorative Treatments
        • Cognitive Stimulation - The authors of the review found active cognitive stimulation therapies to be beneficial in maintaining cognitive and behavioral function.
  • Service Delivery
    • Provider
      • Caregiver-Administered Treatment
        • Results from 3 studies support the training of caregivers to provide cognitive stimulation therapy for individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. However, methodological weakness of studies was noted.
        • The authors of the review found active cognitive stimulation therapies to be beneficial in maintaining cognitive and behavioral function.
        • Further research is warranted to determine the long term benefits of caregiver-administered treatment.

Keywords: Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Cognitive Stimulation

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Added to Compendium: January 2012

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