American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

EBP Compendium: Summary of Systematic Review


Rehabilitation for Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review of Available Evidence

Gage, H., & Storey, L. (2004).
Clinical Rehabilitation, 18(5), 463-482.

Indicators of Review Quality:

The review addresses a clearly focused question No
Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided Yes
Search strategy is described in sufficient detail for replication Yes
Included studies are assessed for study quality Yes
Quality assessments are reproducible No

Description: This is a review of randomized controlled trials and observational studies investigating the effectiveness of non-pharmacological rehabilitation interventions in adults with Parkinson's disease. Ten of the 44 included studies pertain to speech and language treatment, five of which targeted dysarthria treatments.

Question(s) Addressed:

Question not specifically stated.

Population: Community-living adults with Parkinson’s Disease

Intervention/Assessment: Non-pharmalogical rehabilitation including speech and language therapy.

Number of Studies Included: 44 studies of which 10 trials related to speech and language therapy

Years Included: 1980 - 2002

Findings:

Conclusions:

  • Treatment
    • Speech
      • General Findings
        • “Positive changes have been reported in many areas of difficulty encountered by people with Parkinson’s disease, including increases in vocal intensity, reductions in monotony, improvements in voice quality, improvement in articulation and intelligibility, greater fluency in conversation, and better use of facial expression” (p. 465).
        • While the authors suggest that a number of treatments were helpful, “there is little evidence to suggest which approaches are superior” (p. 476).
    • Swallowing
      • General Findings
        • “Beneficial effects of interventions for dysphagia have been demonstrated both by subjective reporting and use of technologies” (p. 465).
        • While the authors suggest that a number of treatments were helpful, “there is little evidence to suggest which approaches are superior” (p. 476).

Keywords: Parkinson's Disease

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Added to Compendium: March 2012

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