SIG 6 Perspectives Vol. 16, No. 2, December 2012

Member:
$45.00
Nonmember:
$59.00
SIG 06 Affiliate:
$5.00
Already in cart - Qty:
You have added this item to your cart.

SIG 6 Perspectives Vol. 16, No. 2, December 2012

This issue of Perspectives focuses on current issues concerning music perception and music training on listeners with normal hearing and those with hearing loss. First, we review the role of pitch memory in music perception. Authors present a thorough discussion of general memory, pitch memory, pitch discrimination, and factors affecting pitch memory. Next, we discuss the influence of music training on pre-attentive neural processing for both younger and older adult listeners, presenting data from a pilot study evaluating the potential for long-term effects of early music training on neural function. Additionally, we explore issues of music perception with amplification, and provide specific strategies for hearing aid use and music listening. Finally, we review the music perception of cochlear implant users, including practical aspects of music enjoyment in everyday life for cochlear implant users.

Learning Outcomes
You will be able to:

  • define the factors that affect pitch memory
  • describe three pre-attentive cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs)
  • describe a typical effect of aging on CAEPs P1-N1-P2, MMN and P3a amplitudes and latencies
  • identify clinical strategies to improve a hearing aid for music listening
  • describe practical strategies that cochlear implant recipients can use to enhance their music perception and enjoyment

Take advantage of the $5 dollar pricing when you become a SIG affiliate. Learn how to join a Special Interest Group (SIG) today.

Table of Contents View the Table of Contents [PDF]

Continuing Education

: 0.35 PDHs: 3.5
: 12/7/2012 to 10/12/2015
: Intermediate

Product Information

Item #(s): WEBS062061
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Language: English
Author: A Collaborative Project of ASHA Professional Development and SIG 6, Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics

Already Purchased?