American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Hearing Conservation for Children

Programs for Kids

Educator Resource Guide
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland State University, and University of Northern Colorado
The Guide—part of the Dangerous Decibels program—is a K–8 curriculum supplement with hands-on science activities about the anatomy and physiology of hearing, the physics of sound, and health-related behaviors for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.

How Your Brain Understands What Your Ear Hears
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
This NIDCD curriculum supplement is for Grades 7–8. Lessons are designed to help students (a) understand the interrelationship of hearing, language, and human communication and (b) develop the healthy hearing habits necessary to avoid noise-induced hearing loss.

Student and Teacher Activities
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
NIDCD offers classroom activities about hearing for Grades 3–6. The activities are designed to

  • help build students' awareness of the importance of hearing conservation and the problem of noise-induced hearing loss,
  • introduce and reinforce scientific understanding of hearing and the science of sound,
  • provide opportunities for children to influence the awareness and understanding of others.

It's a Noisy Planet: Protect Their Hearing
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
This NIDCD campaign was created to help parents of 8- to 12-year-olds teach their children how to avoid hearing loss from overexposure to loud noise. The campaign features a website that advises parents about

  • the causes and prevention of noise-induced hearing loss,
  • how to recognize when a child's hearing is at risk,
  • ways to reduce noise exposure.

The site contains games, posters, and interactive information about noise and hearing loss tailored specifically for tweens.

Listen To Your Buds
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
The "Buds"—two cartoon characters that look like earbuds—were designed to appeal to young children. These icons represent ASHA's ongoing campaign to raise consumer awareness about the potential risk of hearing loss from personal audio technology. The Buds appear on free bookmarks, banners, and screensavers that feature The Rules of Thumb: simple safety guidelines for children age 6 and older.

Hearing Resources for Kids!
National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA)
NHCA is an excellent resource, with activities and materials, information on protecting children's hearing, and children's hearing conservation programs, including Crank It Down.

Questions and Answers: Information About Your Hearing
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
NIDCD offers this interactive quiz with factoids about hearing and hearing loss.

Wise Ears!
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and diverse national organizations
This hearing health education campaign focuses on prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.

ASHA Website Information

Prevention Profile: Audiologist Prevention Activities Get the Word Out

Journal and Online Articles

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