March 25, 2008 Features

Resources Available on Brain Injury Rehabilitation

Materials Prepared by Joint Committee of SLPs, Neuropsychologists

see also

Speech-language pathology and neuropsychology are two of the professions involved in the assessment and treatment of children and adults with cognitive-communication and language disorders resulting from congenital or acquired brain impairment.

Since its insemination, the committee has produced several documents to assist professionals engaged in brain injury rehabilitation. Policy documents are accessible at ASHA Practice Policy and include:

  • 1990 position statement on the value of interdisciplinary practice
  • 1995 (updated in 2008) guidelines for interdisciplinary brain injury teams
  • 2003 report examining commonalities and variations in education standards for both professions

Also available are two peer-reviewed articles:

  • a 2002 article in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation on cognitive rehabilitation
  • a 2007 article in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology on theoretical and clinical contributions to the assessment of memory

Anastasia Raymer, chair of the ASHA/American Psychology Association Joint Committee on Interprofessional Relations, is a professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Speech Pathology, and Special Education at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Contact her at sraymer@odu.edu.

Diane Paul, director of clinical issues in SLP, can be reached at dpaul@asha.org.

cite as: Raymer, A.  & Paul, D. (2008, March 25). Resources Available on Brain Injury Rehabilitation : Materials Prepared by Joint Committee of SLPs, Neuropsychologists. The ASHA Leader.

Resources

Presentations

Raymer, A., Sander, A., Wertheimer, J., & Paul, D. (2006). Collaboration in rehabilitation: Neuropsychologists and speech-language pathologists. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 87(10), e11.

Raymer, A., Sander, A., Paul, D., Brown, S., Chomout, D., & Zingeser, L. (2005, November). Collaboration in rehabilitation: Neuropsychologists and speech-language pathologists. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Diego, CA.

Sander, A., Nakase-Richardson, R., Constantinidou, F., & Paul, D. (2005, November). Memory assessment on an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team. Short course presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Diego, CA.

Sander, A., Raymer, A., Wertheimer, J., Paul, D., & Brown, S. (2006). Perceived roles of neuropsychologists and speech-language pathologists in rehabilitation. Clinical Neuropsychologist, 20(3), 583.
(Winner of the Division 40 Blue Ribbon award for outstanding research.)

Publications

Joint Committee on Interprofessional Relations Between the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA). (1990). Interdisciplinary approaches to brain damage [Position Statement]. Available from http://www.asha.org/policy/PS1990-00093/.

Joint Committee on Interprofessional Relations Between the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA). (2008). Structure and function of an interdisciplinary team for persons with acquired brain injury [Guidelines]. Available from http://www.asha.org/policy/GL2007-00288/.

Paul-Brown, D., & Ricker, J. (2003). Evaluating and treating communication and cognitive disorders: Approaches to referral and collaboration for speech-language pathology and clinical neuropsychology [Technical Report]. Available from http://www.asha.org/policy/TR2003-00137/.

Sander, A., Nakase-Richardson, R., Constantinidou, F., Wertheimer, J., & Paul, D. (2007, November). Memory assessment on an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team: A theoretically based framework. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 16, 316-330.

Ylvisaker, M., Hanks, R., & Johnson-Greene, D. (2002). Perspectives on rehabilitation of individuals with cognitive impairment after brain injury: Rationale for reconsideration of theoretical paradigms. Journal of Head Trauma and Rehabilitation, 17(3), 191-209.

Ylvisaker, M., Hanks, R., & Johnson-Greene, D. (2003). Rehabilitation of children and adults with cognitive-communication disorders after brain injury [Technical Report]. Available from http://www.asha.org/policy/TR2003-00146/. 



  

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