American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Bilingual Service Provider Database Registration Form

ASHA's Office of Multicultural Affairs maintains a list of bilingual service providers, including speech-language pathologists and audiologists, who identify themselves as having these skills based on the definition below. Our listing is used to maintain data on members who are bilingual and to serve as a referral source. Please read the definition below to see if you qualify as a bilingual speech-language pathologist or audiologist. If you qualify, complete this form with your preferred contact information.

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Characteristics of a Bilingual Service Provider

Audiologists or SLPs who present themselves as bilingual for the purposes of providing clinical services must be able to speak their primary language and to speak (or sign) at least one other language with native or near-native proficiency in lexicon (vocabulary), semantics (meaning), phonology (pronunciation), morphology/syntax (grammar), and pragmatics (uses) during clinical management. In addition to linguistic proficiency, the audiologist or SLP must have the specific knowledge and skill sets necessary for the services to be delivered.

Bilingual audiologists must be able to independently provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment/rehabilitative services for auditory, vestibular, and related impairments using the client's/patient's language and preferred mode of communication. They must also have the linguistic proficiency to

  • select and interpret culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment materials, tools, and methods;
  • instruct and assess the client/patient in direct clinical techniques using behavioral, physiologic, and developmental measures;
  • administer and interpret standardized self-report measures of communication difficulties and of psychosocial and behavioral adjustment to auditory dysfunction.

Bilingual SLPs must be able to independently provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services for speech, language, cognitive, voice, and swallowing disorders using the client's/patient's language and preferred mode of communication. They must also have the linguistic proficiency to

  • describe the process of normal speech and language acquisition—for both bilingual and monolingual speakers of that language, including how those processes are manifested in oral and written language (or manually coded languages when applicable);
  • select, administer, and interpret formal and informal assessment procedures to distinguish between communication differences and communication disorders;
  • apply intervention strategies for treatment of communication disorders in the language or mode of communication most appropriate for the needs of the individual.

Contact Information

First Name:*

Last Name:*

Account Number:*

Mailing Address:*

City:*

State:*

Zip Code:*

Phone Number:*

E-mail:*

Listing Information

Certification:*

   

In addition to English, I have native or near native proficiency in the following languages.*

I allow ASHA to release my contact information for professional referrals.*

   

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