American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Neurodegenerative Disorders: Maximizing Patient Outcomes

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Rebecca Axline, LCSW, MSSW, is a supervisory clinical social worker at the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute. Rebecca has over 30 years of clinical social work experience in a variety of settings, including medical centers, active duty military bases, VA centers, employee assistance, hospice care, and school districts. She has management experience in the areas of psychiatric care, employee assistance, and customer service.

Since 2006, she has been helping develop an outpatient social work program at Houston Methodist Neurological Institute. She continues to provide program development and clinical intervention with a primary focus of helping patients and family members cope with the stress of diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders and illnesses. She specializes in MDA/ALS and has worked at the Nantz National Alzheimer Center. Additionally, Rebecca provides teaching and mentorship to graduate social work students and clinical supervision guidance to LMSW social workers. She has been a speaker at informal and formal presentations to community groups, support groups, and continuing education attendees.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Laura J. Ball, MS, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor of communication sciences and disorders at MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Ball has over 30 years of speech-language pathology experience, with neurodegenerative clinical experience in MDA and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association-supported amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinics, neurobehavioral disorders, acute care, skilled nursing, and home health. Her research interests include augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and motor speech disorders. She has authored numerous publications on AAC, ALS, and motor speech disorders across the lifespan. She is currently involved in research examining brain-computer interfaces for AAC access, AAC implementation in acute care, and caregiver attitudes toward and training for AAC for adults.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Dr. Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer, MA, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California, Davis (UCD). She is also a member of the UCD Center for Neuroscience and Neuroscience Graduate Group faculty. She received her MA and PhD degrees from the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of Iowa and completed postdoctoral work in the area of neurolaryngology with Dr. Christy Ludlow at the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Barkmeier-Kraemer was previously on the faculty in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Arizona (1997–2011) where she served as the local chapter NSSLHA faculty advisor for nearly 10 years, receiving the NSSLHA’s Advisor of the Year award in 2006. She is a past member of the Steering Committee and past Coordinator for SIG 3, Voice and Voice Disorders, co-chaired the ASHA Annual Research Symposium on Neural Regeneration in 2009, and recently served as ASHA’s representative to AAO-HNS for Guidelines on Improving Voice Outcomes after Thyroid Surgery. She was awarded ASHA Fellow in 2011. Her primary research and clinical interests relate to neural controls of the larynx for respiration, voicing, and swallowing.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Deanna Britton, PhD, CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, is an SLP in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and lecturer in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle. She is board certified in neurogenic communication disorders in adults by the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS). She recently co-authored a book in the Clinical Dysphagia Series (edited by John Rosenbek and Harrison Jones) with Robert Miller, PhD, titled Dysphagia in Neuromuscular Diseases, and another book with Kathryn M. Yorkston, PhD, Robert M. Miller, PhD, and Edythe Strand, PhD, titled Management of Speech and Swallowing Disorders in Degenerative Diseases (Third Edition).

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation, ASHA
  • Royalty, Plural Publishing, Inc
  • Royalty, Pro-Ed, Inc.
  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Allyson Dykstra, PhD, SLP(C), is an assistant professor in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada. She graduated from Queen's University with an honors bachelor of science degree in psychology. She earned her MSc in communication sciences and disorders (speech-language pathology) and her PhD from Western University. Dr. Dykstra teaches graduate level courses on the ICF conceptual framework, counseling, and resonance disorders. Her research interests focus on examining the relationships among speech intelligibility and communicative participation in individuals with motor speech disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease and oromandibular dystonia. She has authored and co-authored book chapters and research publications on oromandibular dystonia and hypokinetic dysarthria in Parkinson’s disease, and she has published research on the application of the ICF to speech intelligibility in dysarthria.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Jessica E. Huber, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor at Purdue University in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department. Her research emphasis is on the effects of aging and motor disorders on speech production, particularly speech breathing. Her current research focus is on the effects of Parkinson’s disease on vocal loudness, intonation, and cognition.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Grant funds, National Institutes of Health
  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Irene A. Malaty, MD, is an assistant professor at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. She is the director of the National Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence at UF where she also helped create community programs for movement disorder patients, such as Art in Motion and Dance for Life. She also runs a multidisciplinary tic and Tourette syndrome clinic treating patients of all ages. In addition to these areas of primary focus, she treats all types of movement disorders in her practice. Her interests are in non-motor symptoms and movement disorders. She participates in a number of clinical trials and enjoys educating students and trainees in neurology and several other overlapping disciplines. She has lectured on Parkinson’s disease, Tourette syndrome, dystonia, and botulinum toxin locally and internationally. She was voted Clinical Teacher of the Year for 2012–2013 by the neurology residents and received the Exemplary Teacher Award for 2011–2012 and 2012–2013. She has served on the executive board of her state neurological society (the Florida Society of Neurology) for several years and is currently an officer. She has been involved in international outreach.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Research funding, National Parkinson Foundation
  • Research funding, Tourette Syndrome Association
  • Research funding, Merz Pharmaceuticals
  • Research funding, Teva
  • Research funding, Apokyn
  • Research funding, Acadia
  • Research funding, Abbott
  • Research Funding, MH
  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Michelle McDonagh is a registered dietitian for the Froedtert Health system in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She is an outpatient dietitian practicing in the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Center, the Cystic Fibrosis Center, and the General Internal Medicine clinics. She earned a bachelor's of science degree in human nutrition from the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland. She holds a post-baccalaureate certificate in dietetics from Mount Mary College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Dr. Jay Rosenbek, PhD, CCC-SLP, BC-NCD, is a professor for the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Florida, Gainesville. His clinical specialties include neurologic abnormalities of language, speech, and swallowing. He is board certified in the area of neurogenic communication disorders. His research has concentrated on developing behavioral treatments and measures for determining their effectiveness. He is presently investigating treatments for deficits in emotional communication and for swallowing disorders following neurologic disease. He is coordinator for the graduate introductory course on rehabilitation science and for the rehabilitation science doctorate in the department. He is an ASHA Fellow and received both the Honors of ASHA and the Kleffner Career Clinical Award for 25 years of outstanding clinical service.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

Lisa Satterfield, MS, CCC-A, is ASHA’s director of health care regulatory advocacy and the organization’s liaison to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. In her current role, she monitors health care policy and regulations, coordinates strategies for improving coverage and payment, and assists members in the implementation of Medicare regulations for speech-language pathology and audiology services. Prior to joining ASHA, Lisa was the staff audiology consultant for the California Medi-Cal (Medicaid) program and California Children’s Services. Lisa has audiology clinical experience that includes infant, pediatric, and adult diagnostic services in the university clinic, private practice, and hospital health care settings.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker is ASHA staff.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Lobbying activities, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Dr. Michelle S. Troche, PhD, CCC-SLP, is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences in the College of Public Health and Health Professions with the University of Florida Health Science Center. The goal of Dr. Troche’s line of research is to develop treatment paradigms to improve upper airway dysfunction in persons with neurodegenerative disease. Her current research interests include (1) expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) for dysphagia/dystussia, (2) defining cough disorders in Parkinson’s disease (PD), (3) effects of cognition on airway protective mechanisms in PD, and (4) defining the effects of deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS) on airway protective mechanisms.

Dr. Troche remains active in clinical practice with the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration where she evaluates and treats speech-language- voice and swallowing disorders in persons with movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, dystonia). She also participates in monthly education to newly diagnosed patients with Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Speaker received financial compensation from ASHA for the contents of this presentation.

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • None

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