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Audiology 2015: Quality Outcomes for Cochlear Implants

Conference Faculty

Audiology - Register Now!Katie R. Brennan, MD, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist in the Center for Childhood Deafness at Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. Brennan has experience assessing speech, language, and auditory skills in children with hearing loss from birth to age 21. She provides individual listening sessions for families whose children have a range of degrees of hearing loss and use a variety of communication modes, with the goal of maximizing their ability to learn through listening. Brennan is Hanen-certified and has a special interest in coaching caregivers to be primary language facilitators. She works as an auditory consultant providing training and coaching for school agencies nationally to support students with hearing loss. Brennan also is an instructor at the Universities of Nebraska at Lincoln and Omaha in the Deaf Education and Communication Disorders departments.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation, which is being paid to Boys Town National Research Hospital
  • Speech-language pathologist/auditory consultant at Boys Town National Research Hospital

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Craig Buchman, MD, FACS, is a professor, vice chairman for clinical affairs, and the otology/neurotology/skull base surgery division chief in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He completed his residency at the University of Pittsburgh and his fellowship at the House Ear Clinic in Los Angeles. He co-chaired the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Meeting in Charlotte (2007), is the chair of the William House Cochlear Implant Study Group and the Implantable Devices Committee of the AAO-HNS, a founding board member of the American Cochlear Implant Alliance (ACIA) and its current chairman of the board, and a member of the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH). He has published extensively in the field and serves as the associate editor for JAMA-Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery and an editorial board member for Otology & Neurotology. His investigative interests are broad in the field of hearing loss and rehabilitation, and his ongoing research centers on the utility of auditory evoked cortical responses in the pediatric population and the use of auditory brainstem implantation in children with cochlear nerve disorders.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology/HNS at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
  • Serves on the advisory board of Cochlear Corp and Advanced Bionics
  • Received grant funding from NIH/NIDCD

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Ferenc Bunta, PhD, is an associate professor in communication sciences and disorders at the University of Houston in Texas. His research focuses on cross-linguistic and bilingual phonological acquisition in children and adults with typical speech, language, and hearing as well as children with hearing loss.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Associate professor at the University of Houston
  • Received grant funding from NIH/NIDCD

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Performs research and service for the Center for Hearing & Speech

Catherine Cronin Carotta, EdD, CCC-SLP, is the associate director of the Center for Childhood Deafness at Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. She is a speech-language pathologist with many years of experience in the assessment and education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing using sign and spoken language modalities. Carotta has worked in public and private school settings, hospitals, and university-based clinical programs. With a doctorate in leadership education, she works to create learning organizations using current leadership models. She has created a teacher renewal model entitled The Work of Your Life and has authored the work, Sustaining the Spirit to Teach, Lead, Serve. She is actively involved in providing consultation to organizations regarding leadership, renewal, and services for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation, which is being paid to Boys Town National Research Hospital
  • Associate director of clinical services at Boys Town National Research Hospital

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Michael W. Douglas, MA, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and a certified auditory-verbal therapist. He received his BA in speech-language pathology in 1994 and an MA in 1996 from the University of North Texas. He received his certification in auditory-verbal therapy in 2002. Since then, he has focused his career on teaching children with hearing loss to listen and speak in various settings including early childhood programs, schools, hospitals, private practice, and cochlear implant centers. Douglas served as the director of the speech clinic and director of intervention services at the Center for Hearing and Speech in Houston, Texas, from 2005–2012 and was an adjunct instructor at the University of Houston from 2010–2012. He has contributed to several peer-reviewed publications on bilingual issues for children with hearing loss. Currently, he mentors aspiring certified AVTs, lectures worldwide, and is the principal of the Mama Lere Hearing School in the Bill Wilkerson Center at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Employed by the Mama Lere Hearing School at Vanderbilt University
  • Speaker/writer for MED-EL

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Virginia Driscoll, MA, is a research specialist for the music perception team as part of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Center. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in music therapy focusing on music perception and rehabilitation for individuals who have hearing loss and cochlear implants. For more than 10 years, Driscoll has collaborated with speech-language pathologists and audiologists in providing music therapy for children who have hearing loss and speech-language delays. She has presented her research internationally.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Research specialist at the University of Iowa

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Camille Dunn, PhD, CCC-A, is a research scientist who received her bachelor's, master's, and doctorate degrees from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. During her doctoral program, Dunn focused on temporal processing changes in the aging auditory system. Currently, she works as the director of the Cochlear Implant Center for the Adult and Pediatric Cochlear Implant Programs at the University of Iowa, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, and is a principal investigator on an NIH-funded grant studying hybrid cochlear implants.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Director of cochlear implants at the University of Iowa

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Jill B. Firszt, PhD, CCC-A, is a professor in the department of otolaryngology and director of the Cochlear Implant Program at Washington University School of Medicine. She is also an adjunct professor in the Program in audiology and communication sciences at Central Institute for the Deaf at Washington University. She earned her BS in speech and hearing science, MA in educational audiology, and PhD in speech and hearing science from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Firszt has been working with cochlear implant adult and pediatric patients in clinical and research studies since 1985. Her research lab is currently focused on studies of asymmetry in hearing, including cochlear implant recipients who receive a second implant, as well as adults and children with unilateral hearing loss. She is the recipient of a 5-year R01 grant from the NIH/NIDCD. Her previous research has been supported by the NIH, the Deafness Research Foundation, and the American Hearing Research Foundation. Firszt has numerous publications in the areas of speech recognition, electrophysiology, and imaging measures in individuals with substantial hearing loss.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Professor and director of the cochlear implant program at the Washington University School of Medicine
  • Received honorarium and research funds from Advanced Bionics, where she is a board member
  • Received honorarium and research funds from Cochlear Corporation, where she is a board member

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Treasurer of American Cochlear Implant Alliance (ACIA)

Kate E. Gfeller, PhD, is the Russell and Florence Day Professor of Liberal Arts and Science at the University of Iowa, where she holds a joint appointment in the School of Music and Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She directs graduate studies in music therapy and is principal investigator of the music perception project for the Iowa Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Center (Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics), funded by NIH, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, and DOD. She is internationally known for her research regarding music perception of cochlear implant recipients, and she has developed innovative approaches to aural rehabilitation for adults and children who use assistive hearing devices.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Russell and Florence Day Professor of Liberal Arts and Science at the University of Iowa

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

René H. Gifford, PhD, CCC-A, is an associate professor at Vanderbilt University and director of the Cochlear Implant Program and the Cochlear Implant Research Laboratory. Her research has been funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders for more than 10 years and focuses on a combination of electric and acoustic hearing including basic auditory function and speech perception.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Associate professor of hearing and speech sciences, director of the cochlear implant program, and associate director of implantable hearing technologies at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center
  • Consultant and member of the audiology advisory board for Advanced Bionics, Cochlear Americas, and MED-EL

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Derek M. Houston, PhD, joined the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in July 2015. He received his doctorate in psychology from Johns Hopkins University in 2000. His graduate training research focused on how normal hearing, typically developing infants segment words from fluent speech and recognize words across different talkers. After graduating, he moved to Indiana University School of Medicine and constructed the world's first laboratory to investigate the speech perception and language skills of deaf infants who receive cochlear implants. Since then, his work has investigated the effects of early auditory deprivation and subsequent cochlear implantation on speech discrimination, attention to speech, sensitivity to language-specific properties of speech, word learning, and general cognitive skills in deaf infants and toddlers. His research in Columbus, Ohio, represents a collaborative effort between Ohio State University and Nationwide Children's Hospital. His work is currently funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Associate professor at The Ohio State University

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Michelle L. Hughes, PhD, CCC-A, received her master's in audiology in 1995 and doctorate in hearing science in 2003 from the University of Iowa. She is currently the coordinator of the Cochlear Implant Program and director of the Cochlear Implant Research Laboratory at Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. She serves as an adjunct associate professor for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in addition to an adjunct appointment at Nova Southeastern University for the United Kingdom distance AuD program. Hughes holds two R01 grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to study physiology as a potential predictor of perception in cochlear implants and to advance the use of telepractice for cochlear implant service delivery. Her areas of expertise include evoked potentials and psychophysical measures in cochlear implants. Hughes is a licensed audiologist and a member of ASHA, the American Auditory Society, and the Acoustical Society of America. She is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Audiology.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Director of the Cochlear Implant Research Lab at Boys Town National Research Hospital
  • Received grant funding from NIH/NIDCD

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial interests to disclose

Lisa M. Satterfield, MS, CCC-A, is ASHA's liaison to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and advocates with federal officials for audiology and speech-language pathology services. She is an expert in health care regulations, policies, and coding. Prior to joining ASHA, Satterfield was a consultant for California Medi-Cal (Medicaid) and managed the California Children's Services cochlear implant program. While there she expanded the benefit for children to include bilateral cochlear implants and assisted cochlear implant providers with appropriate coding and billing. Satterfield is an ASHA-certified audiologist, having practiced adult and pediatric audiology in hospitals, private practice, and university clinics.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Director of Health Care Regulatory Advocacy at ASHA

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Lobbies on behalf of ASHA with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

Jeffrey L. Simmons, MA, CCC-A, is a clinical audiologist at Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska, where he has practiced since receiving his master's degree from the University of Northern Colorado in 1996. He currently serves as the coordinator of the Cochlear Implant Clinic in the Lied Learning and Technology Center for Childhood Deafness and Vision Disorders.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Cochlear implant clinic coordinator at Boys Town National Research Hospital

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the coordinating committee for ASHA Special Interest Group 9

Linda J. Spencer, PhD, CCC-SLP, is the program director and an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at New Mexico State University. Previously, she was an assistant professor for 3 years at the State University of NY in Geneseo. She also was an investigator at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Children's Cochlear Implant Project, where she was an assistant research scientist and a research assistant for more than a decade. Her interests include examining the speech-language and literacy development of children with hearing loss and also those who use cochlear implants. She earned her bachelor's and doctorate degrees in speech and hearing science at the University of Iowa. Her current line of research involves examining the relationship of phonology, language skills, and reading abilities in children with normal hearing and in children with hearing loss. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Ear and Hearing; Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research; Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education; Laryngoscope; and the American Journal of Audiology.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Program director and assistant professor at New Mexico State University
  • Received grant funding from NIH

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • ASHA member

Holly F. Teagle, AuD, CCC-A, has worked for 30 years in audiology, focusing on the use of cochlear implant technology to benefit adults and children with severe to profound hearing loss. The opportunity to collaborate with other clinicians and researchers in this dynamic field has been most gratifying and the experience of participating in various research protocols and processes has enhanced the delivery of her clinical work. Teaching at the graduate level has afforded her the opportunity to gain perspective on the history and development of the field and share the depth of her clinical expertise.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Received financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation
  • Associate professor and director of Carolina Children's Communicative Disorders Program at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the audiology advisory board of Cochlear Americas

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