Conference Faculty Audiology 2017: Cutting-Edge Perspectives in Service Delivery for Older Adults

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2017 Audiology - RegistrationSamira Anderson, PhD, CCC-A, is an assistant professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the University of Maryland. After practicing as a clinical audiologist for 26 years, she decided to pursue a doctorate in auditory neuroscience at Northwestern University to better understand the hearing difficulties experienced by her patients. She obtained her PhD in December 2012 and joined the faculty at the University of Maryland in 2013. Anderson's research focuses on the effects of development, aging, and hearing loss on central auditory processing and neuroplasticity using electrophysiology as her primary assessment tool. 

Financial Disclosures:

  • Assistant professor at the University of Maryland
  • Grant funding from the American Hearing Research Foundation, Hearing Health Foundation, National Institutes of Health: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and National Institute on Aging
  • Consults for and collaborates with Widex USA 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Editorial board member for the American Journal of Audiology

Demetra Antimisiaris, PharmD, BSGP, FASCP, is an associate professor of medicine at the University of Louisville. She graduated with her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of the Pacific and completed a geriatric clinical pharmacy residency at VA Medical Center-Sepulveda/UCLA. "Dr. Dee" is a Fellow of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) and Board Certified Geriatric Pharmacist (BCGP). Her research interests include multi-stakeholder decision-making regarding medication use and health systems root cause analysis regarding medication. She teaches Med-Pharm for second-year med students and dental students, and provides education for interdisciplinary learners on medication management topics. She leads an endowed program, the U of L Frazier Polypharmacy and Medication Management Program, which is unique among medical schools in the United States, and is dedicated to improving outcomes related to polypharmacy through education, research, and outreach. She also serves on the ASCP education and research committee with focus on development of preceptor resources and serves as an adviser for several organizations regarding medication use education.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate professor of medicine at the University of Louisville and director of the Polypharmacy and Medication Management Program
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation 

Michelle Arnold, AuD, CCC-A, is currently is a clinical instructor at the University of South Florida (USF), located in Tampa, in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and is a candidate for a PhD in aging studies, also at USF. Her primary areas of interest are policy related to hearing loss, hearing aids, and older adults, as well as relationships between hearing loss, aging, and health services utilization in monolingual and bilingual Spanish speakers. Most recently, Arnold has collaborated on research involving the decision-making processes of older adults with chronic health conditions and optimal hearing intervention as a possible factor to mediate the trajectory of dementia. Arnold’s previous work includes research focused on hearing aid digital noise reduction algorithms and acceptable noise level outcomes, audiological rehabilitation treatment plans for blast-injured veterans, tinnitus, and speech understanding in noise screening for adults.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Gerontological Society of America

Kathleen M. Cienkowski, PhD, CCC-A, is an associate professor and program director of audiology at the University of Connecticut. Cienkowski studies the successful management of hearing loss, with an emphasis on aging adults and their use of hearing devices to improve speech understanding. She currently is investigating the benefits of audiological rehabilitation among adults with acquired hearing loss. Her work has been funded by the Department of Education, National Institutes of Health, and Veterans Administration. She has served as the president of the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology, coordinator for ASHA SIG 7 (Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation), and associate editor for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research Hearing Section.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate professor and program director of audiology at the University of Connecticut
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Coordinator for ASHA SIG 7 
  • Member of planning committee for this online conference

Elizabeth Convery, MS, is a senior research audiologist at the National Acoustic Laboratories in Sydney, Australia, and a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland. She has conducted pioneering work into the use of self-fitting hearing aids—amplification devices that can be fitted, fine-tuned, and managed independently by the user, without the need for direct clinician involvement or additional specialized equipment—as a way of empowering individuals with hearing loss to assume a more central role in the direction and management of their ongoing care. As part of her doctoral work at the University of Queensland, Convery is currently investigating the application of a chronic health condition framework to audiological practice, with a focus on client self-management and self-fitting hearing aids. Convery has been a qualified audiologist since 2000 and maintains an active interest in "on-the-ground" service delivery through voluntary outreach work in remote Aboriginal communities in northern Australia and developing countries in the South Pacific.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Senior research audiologist at the Australian Hearing National Acoustics Laboratories
  • Member and received grant funding from the HEARing Cooperative Research Centre
  • Speaker for the American Auditory Society 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Research materials from SoundWorld Solutions
  • Collaborated with Sivantos Germany on research
  • Member of the Audiological Society of Australia
  • Doctoral student at the University of Queensland 

Debra Dobbs, PhD, is an associate professor at the School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa campus. She received her PhD in sociology from the University of Kansas (2002) and was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2002–2004). Her main areas of research expertise are end-of-life care for older adults who live in community, residential, and nursing home settings. Dobbs currently is conducting an intervention study implementing a palliative care education program in assisted living in Florida in collaboration with area hospice organizations. She also has conducted research about quality of care at the end of life and hospice utilization in assisted living. Dobbs serves as a member of Florida’s Physician’s Order for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) Task Force and is a Fellow for the Gerontological Society of America. She also serves on the executive committee for the University of South Florida’s Center for Hospice, Palliative and End-of-Life Studies.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Physician's Order for Life Sustaining Treatment Task Force

Ann Clock Eddins, PhD, MBA, CCC-A, FAAA, is an associate professor and associate chair in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa. She holds degrees from Northwestern University, University of California at Santa Barbara, University at Buffalo, and the University of Rochester. She is co-director of the Auditory & Speech Sciences Laboratory and a core member of the Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research at USF. Her research and clinical interests are aimed at understanding the neural correlates of auditory perception in normal hearing adults and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing, with a particular focus on neural plasticity with aging, tinnitus, and rehabilitative intervention. She also has expertise in small business development, health care economics, and clinical management decision-making.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Florida and associate chair of the Auditory and Speech Sciences Laboratory
  • Research funding from the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Aging (NIA) and National Science Foundation (NSF) 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Howard W. Francis, MD, MBA, FACS, is a professor and chief of the Division of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences in the Department of Surgery at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. As a neurotologist, Francis' clinical interests span the full scope of this sub-specialty, including the management of conditions of the ear, skull base, and associated nervous system. His research interests include the determination of best practices of acoustic neuroma treatment, the examination of functional outcomes of cochlear implantation in young children and older adults, and the study of best practices in surgical education. After completing his high school education in Jamaica and his bachelor's degree at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Francis earned his medical degree from the Harvard-MIT division of Health, Science and Technology at Harvard Medical School and then completed his internship, residency, and fellowship training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. After 19 years on the faculty at Johns Hopkins, during which he served as residency program director, director of the Johns Hopkins Listening Center, and vice director of the department, he was appointed chief of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences at Duke in March 2017.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Chief of the Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences Division at Duke University Medical Center
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Surgical advisory board for Advance Bionics Corporation, Cochlear Corporation, and MedEl Corporation 

Chad Gladden, AuD, CCC-A, is the audiology telehealth coordinator for the VA Audiology and Speech Pathology National Program Office. Prior to this position, he was the acting service chief and supervisor, for audiology and speech pathology, and the telehealth program manager at the William S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. He is a national spokesperson for the advancement of teleaudiology and serves on numerous national and regional committees dealing with teleaudiology initiatives within the VA. Gladden has authored articles and presented nationally on ways to get started in teleaudiology and has served as a master preceptor to beginning teleaudiology practitioners. He has a strong commitment to advancing telehealth and preparing staff for involvement in this important service.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Audiology telehealth coordinator for the Audiology and Speech Pathology National Program Office at the Department of Veterans Affairs 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Julie A. Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, is a clinical research audiologist and the director the Cleveland Clinic Vestibular Disorders Laboratories. She earned her PhD from the University of Cincinnati in 2006 and completed a post-doctoral training fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in 2009. Her research program is focused on clinical decision analysis pertaining to patients across the life span with vestibular disorders, with a distinct line of research relating to risk of falling assessment and prevention.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Clinical research audiologist and the director the Cleveland Clinic Vestibular Disorders Laboratories 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Board of directors of the American Balance Society
  • Member of ASHA's National Advisory Committee 

Gyl Kasewurm, AuD, has owned and operated Professional Hearing Services (PHS) in Saint Joseph, Michigan, in for more than 30 years. The practice is known as a benchmark for the patient experience across the country. Kasewurm's motto then and now continues to be "work hard, push ahead, and never look back!" Kasewurm has earned many awards and honors, including a Distinguished Achievement Award from the American Academy of Audiology, but she is most proud of the Leadership Award that was bestowed upon her by her local Chamber of Commerce. Kasewurm is a well-known author and sought-after speaker and prides herself on her advice on taking a practice "from fine to fabulous."

Financial Disclosures:

  • Owner of Professional Hearing Services (PHS), Ltd.
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Gitte Keidser, PhD, is a senior research scientist with the National Acoustic Laboratories in Sydney, Australia, where she manages the Rehabilitation Devices Section. Her current work investigates the real-life impact of hearing loss and hearing devices when taking auditory profile, linguistic knowledge, and cognitive ability into account. Her previous research and many publications have focused on hearing aid users' preference for different amplification characteristics in different listening conditions, the effects of advanced signal processing strategies on user performance, and trainable and self-fitting devices. Keidser is a member of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology, an associate editor of the International Journal of Audiology, and on the editorial board of several other journals.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Senior research scientist at the Australian Hearing National Acoustics Laboratories
  • Member and received grant funding from the HEARing Cooperative Research Centre
  • Past speaker for Phonak 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Collaborates with SoundWorld Solutions and Sivantos on research

Nicole Marrone, PhD, CCC-A, holds the James S. and Dyan Pignatelli/UniSource Clinical Chair in Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults at The University of Arizona and is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Her research investigates hearing loss and rehabilitation in adults, with a focus on reducing hearing health care disparities and maximizing communication for individuals and their families. Marrone’s research is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health, and she serves as the associate coordinator for ASHA’s SIG 7 (Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation).

Financial Disclosures:

  • Assistant professor at University of Arizona
  • Research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Associate coordinator for ASHA's Special Interest Group 7

Craig W. Newman, PhD, CCC-A, is a vice chair and the section head of Allied Hearing, Speech, and Balance Services in the Head and Neck Institute of the Cleveland Clinic. Newman serves as the co-director of the Audiology Research Lab and Tinnitus Management Clinic. He also holds the rank of professor in the Department of Surgery in the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. His current clinical interests include tinnitus management and hearing technology. Along with Dr. Sharon Sandridge he has presented and published in the areas of hearing, dizziness, and tinnitus outcome measurement, hearing and tinnitus device technology, and precepting. He serves as associate editor (rehabilitation) for the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology and is a reviewer for a number of scholarly journals. Newman is an ASHA Fellow and was awarded the Jerger Career Award for Research in Audiology by the American Academy of Audiology.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Section head of Allied Hearing, Speech, and Balance Services at the Cleveland Clinic
  • Topic co-chair for assessment and intervention: pediatrics for the 2016 ASHA Convention and an invited short course presenter at the 2015 ASHA Convention
  • Research funding from Oticon 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Carrie Nieman, MD, MPH, is a post-doctoral research fellow in the Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health with Dr. Frank Lin, and an otolaryngology chief resident at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Nieman is also the co-founder of Access HEARS, a social enterprise committed to affordable, accessible hearing care. As a clinician, researcher, and social entrepreneur, her focus is on understanding and addressing disparities in hearing health care among older Americans. Her work translates research in gerontology, social design, intervention development, community-based participatory research, and a human factors approach to design to advance research in hearing care disparities and bring innovation to underserved communities.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Post-doctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health.
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Jill E. Preminger, PhD, CCC-A, is a professor and director of the Program in Audiology at the University of Louisville School of Medicine and chief of the Division of Communicative Disorders in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery & Communicative Disorders. Preminger's research interests are in adult rehabilitative audiology using both quantitative and qualitative methods. She is interested in understanding the audiologic rehabilitative process (including the uptake and use of hearing aids) from the point of view of adults with hearing loss, their spouses, and their adult children. Currently, she is developing an internet-based self-management program with the intent to improve the uptake of audiology services in adults with unaddressed hearing impairment.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Professor and director of the Program in Audiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine
  • Chief of the Division of Communicative Disorders in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery & Communicative Disorders
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Member of the Phonak Patient and Family Centered Care Expert Circle 
  • Coordinating committeee of ASHA Special Interest Group 7 (Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation) 

Victoria Sanchez, AuD, PhD, CCC-A, F-AAA, earned a bachelor's degree in interdisciplinary studies from the University of California - Santa Barbara. She earned her AuD and PhD from the University of South Florida (USF). Currently, Sanchez is a research assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at USF, where she teaches, performs clinical services, and leads several research studies. She is an investigator in the Auditory Rehabilitation & Clinical Trials Laboratory, and her research areas of interest are speech perception, auditory cognitive neuroscience, auditory rehabilitation, evidence-based practice, and the effects of various disorders and interventions on the auditory and vestibular systems. Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Sanchez was a clinical and research audiologist at the Bay Pines Veteran Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. 

Financial Disclosures:

  • Research assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Florida and director of the Auditory Rehabilitation & Clinical Trials Laboratory (ARCT Lab)
  • Rresearch funding and financial support for consulting services from Autifony Therapeutics
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Sharon A. Sandridge, PhD, CCC-A, is the director of clinical services, co-director of the Audiology Research Laboratory, and co-director of the Tinnitus Management Clinic in the Head & Neck Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. She received her BA and MA from the University of Akron and her PhD from the University of Florida. Her primary clinical and research interests are in the areas of amplification; hearing loss prevention; treatment of tinnitus; and electrophysiology, including neurodiagnostics, intraoperative monitoring, and identification of children with hearing loss. She and her colleague, Dr. Craig Newman, have completed a number of funded-research projects and have authored a number of articles in the areas of hearing and tinnitus device technology, outcome measurement development/standardization, and electrophysiology. Currently, they are evaluating the differential benefits of hearing aids and combination (hearing aids and sound generators) devices in patients with hearing loss and tinnitus.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Director of clinical services, co-director of the Audiology Research Laboratory, and co-director of the Tinnitus Management Clinic in the Head & Neck Institute at the Cleveland Clinic
  • ASHA Convention topic co-chair in 2016 and 2017 and  ASHA Convention co-chair for 2018
  • Complementary registration to the 2015 ASHA Convention as an invited short course speaker
  • Research funding from Oticon
  • Financial compensation from Audiology Online for past presentations  
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Lisa Satterfield, MS, CCC-A, is ASHA’s director of health care regulatory advocacy. She is the liaison to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), and she advocates on behalf of audiologists and speech-language pathologists with CMS staff regarding policy and payment. Her primary topic areas of expertise include the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), functional outcome reporting requirements for therapy services, manual medical review, and Medicare audits. Prior to joining ASHA staff, Satterfield was employed by the state of California Department of Health Care Services as an internal audiology consultant and worked on policy analysis, case management, and contract implementation for hearing aids, telehealth, cochlear implants, and California Children’s Services. She received her degree from the University of Southern Mississippi in 1994 and worked clinically in hospital, private practice, and university clinic settings until 2006.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Associate director of the National Center for Evidence-Based Practice (NCEP) at ASHA 

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Pamela Souza, PhD, CCC-A, directs an active laboratory whose members study aspects of aging, cognition, and speech perception. Her research interests include use of signal-processing amplification that affects acoustic speech cues, how those changes interact with listener age and cognitive status, and how research findings in this area can direct clinical practice. Recent collaborative research includes how age and working memory influence response to hearing aid signal processing; consequences of loss of spectral (pitch) selectivity; and how traumatic brain injury affects speech and sound perception. Souza is an ASHA Fellow and serves on the Psychoacoustic and Perception Technical Committee of the ASA. Her work is supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. She is also a practicing clinical audiologist who has worked with patients ranging from pediatric to geriatric populations, including nearly 15 years as a VA audiologist.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Knowles Hearing Center at Northwestern University
  • Grant funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Barbara Weinstein, PhD, CCC-A, is a leader in the field of geriatric audiology. She developed the world's most widely used tools to identify patients with hearing loss, which has been translated into more than 20 different languages and is used globally to document the negative health effects associated with hearing loss and the outcomes associated with hearing aid use, audiologic rehabilitation and counseling, and e-rehabilitation. Weinstein has also researched widely in geriatric audiology around screening and around psychosocial factors associated with hearing loss. She completed one of the first studies on senile dementia and hearing loss and hearing loss and social isolation. Weinstein is an accomplished and award-winning clinician and educator who founded and directed the doctoral program in audiology at the Graduate Center, CUNY in New York City as well as the doctoral programs in public health, nursing sciences, and physical therapy. The author of both editions of Geriatric Audiology, Weinstein has represented the field of audiology on federal panels and has been a leader in audiology professional societies.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Professor and founding executive officer in audiology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • No nonfinancial relationships to the content of this presentation

Jennifer Yeagle, MEd, CCC-A, is a cochlear implant audiologist at the Johns Hopkins Listening Center, where she has worked with cochlear implants for the last 18 years. Her research interests focus on the functional outcomes of cochlear implantation in older adults. She completed her bachelor's degree in speech-language pathology at the University of Central Florida and earned her master's degree in audiology from the University of Virginia. Yeagle completed her audiology clinical fellowship at the University of Virginia Medical Center, where she developed her interest in cochlear implants.

Financial Disclosures:

  • Cochlear implant audiologist at Johns Hopkins Listening Center
  • Audiology Advisory Board for MedEl 
  • Financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures:

  • Adviser for the Hearing Loss Association of America 

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